Posts

Faculty Member Việt Lê in Queer Horizons | Center for Art and Thought

QUEER HORIZONS

Queer Horizons features the work of Asian American and Asian diasporic artists whose work envisions a queer future that unsettles the past, disrupts the present, and imagines new worlds beyond the limits of the horizon.

We take inspiration from José Esteban Muñoz, the late queer studies scholar, and his conception of a “not yet here.” As he explains in Cruising Utopia, the “not yet here” is a phenomenon of queer futurity that “allows us to see and feel beyond the quagmire of the present.”

Within the last ten years in the US, we have celebrated the legal recognition of same-sex marriage, the end of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” and the formal acceptance of gays in the military, and increased visibility of LGBTQ bodies and personalities in popular culture. In our present moment, however, LGBTQ rights, safety, and health care are increasingly under threat. Simultaneously, the current administration frames Asian American communities as “un-American,” the after tremors along old Yellow Peril fault lines. They are foreign, unassimilable, undocumented: Muslim “terrorists,” hordes of H1B visa techie taking over American jobs, or “model minority” students taking up too much space in classrooms.

However, the artists and works in Queer Horizons name a possibility beyond the “model minority”: as queer Asian American artists, they disrupt the model minority narrative defined by heteronormative notions of success. Each artist engages a non-linear temporality moving between pasts, presents, and futures, and each work gestures towards a queer history that we, as Queer Asian Americans, can excavate, (re)create, and (re)produce in our pasts, presents, and futures. For example, Greyson Hong’s Costco photos, Việt Lê’s productions of club scenes/ online performances, and Tina Takemoto’s unconventional short film all tell of an alternative past to inform a queer alternative future. As we think of these experiences at the intersections with undocumented status, foreignness, and Islamophobia, their highly experimental and queer aesthetic in storytelling suggests further radical potential.

It is in this dangerous political climate that the artists in Queer Horizons insist on claiming liminal and hybrid spaces and lives, queer collectivity, and intersectional solidarity. Embracing failure, misbehavior, non-normativity, and defiant joyfulness thus becomes a radical form of resistance. This is the kind of utopian horizon that we call forward. In the spirit of artist Jeffrey Augustine Songco’s video, “Let’s Dance America!”

Queer Horizons appears in conjunction with the publication of Laura Kina and Jan Christian Bernabe’s book, Queering Contemporary Asian American Art (University of Washington Press, 2017).

Curated by Jan Christian Bernabe and Laura Kina

Curatorial Assistant: Mads Le

Contributors: Anida Yoeu Ali, Sita Kuratomi Bhaumik, Kim Anno, Wafaa Bilal, Greyson Hong, Kiam Marcelo Junio, Việt Lê, Maya Mackrandilal, Zavé Martohardjono, Jeffrey Augustine Songco, Tina Takemoto, and Saya Woolfalk.

Contributors’ works are published in staggered waves from late-June to late-July 2017, after which the whole exhibition are archived permanently on CA+T’s website.

Special thanks to the Andy Warhol Foundation and the California Institute of Contemporary Arts for fiscal support.

 

 

latest Nike Sneakers | 【発売情報】 近日発売予定のナイキストア オンライン リストックまとめ – スニーカーウォーズ

Alumna Yukiyo Kawano | Suspended Moment | Los Alamos Performance

On the anniversary of the world’s first atomic test Suspended Moment, a sculpture installation and Butoh dance and poetry performance by Los Alamos native Allison Cobb, Hiroshima native Yukiyo Kawano, with Butoh choreography/dance by Meshi Chavez, soundscape by Lisa DeGrace, and video projections by Stephen A. Miller, will be performed in Los Alamos, NM.

At the center of the performance is a life-sized sculpture of the bomb dropped on Nagasaki in 1945, created by the artist Yukiyo Kawano. Yuki was born and raised in Hiroshima, a third-generation atomic bomb survivor. She creates her sculptures from WWII-era kimonos that belonged to her grandmother, and sews them together with her hair, melding the DNA of generations of atomic bomb survivors.

co-sponsored by
Los Alamos History Museum, Los Alamos/Japan Project, and Los Alamos County Library System. Funded in part by a grant from the New Mexico Intervention Fund of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Additional Funding: Kawano has received a Career Opportunity Grant award from the Oregon Arts Commission.

The performance takes place from 4-5:30 p.m. at Historic Fuller Lodge, 2132 Central Ave., Los Alamos, NM 87544.Nike air jordan Sneakers | 【海外近日発売予定】 サウスパーク × アディダス オリジナルス キャンパス 80S “タオリー” (GZ9177) – スニーカーウォーズ

Alumnus Ben C. Vitualla Solo Show @ Gallery Luperca Nashville

365 Days

Ben C. Vitualla

Curated By May Hwen

July 1-31

WeHo Crawl Reception

July 1 | 6-9 PM

East Side Project Space

July 1-31

Gallery Luperca is proud to partner with Sticky Rice Collective and curator May Hwen to present 365 Days: New Works by Ben C. Vitualla. Vitualla is the founder and curator of downtown Nashville’s Arcade-based Blend Studio.

Vitualla’s work in a range of mediums is a processing of and commentary on the socio-political environment.  He says, “The current state of our world and my experiences are topics on which I represent in my practice. Themes of politics, profiling minorities, and poverty are focuses I am interested in conveying in my work. My hope is that it will encourage dialogue and maybe understanding issue the world is facing.”

The show opens during the Wedgewood Houston Art Crawl from 6-9 PM on July 1 and runs through the end of the month. The opening reception, hosted by Sticky Rice Collective, will include food trucks created by Sticky Rice alums parked outside.

For further information, artist biography, and images, please contact the gallery.

Gallery Luperca | East Side Project Space | 507 Hagan St. | Nashville, TN 37203

615-669-1384| [email protected] | www.galleryluperca.com

Gallery hours: W-R 2-8  Sun 4-7  | Every First Saturday 6-9 PM

Sportswear free shipping | Yeezy Boost 350 Trainers

MFA Candidate Corey Pickett @ Central Features Contemporary Art

Corey Pickett: Blank Cartridge

Reception: July 8, 6:00 to 8:00 pm.m
Blank Cartridge is an exhibition of provocative new sculptures by Clovis based-artist Corey Pickett. This series of artworks serves as an appeal for “common-sense” gun laws and the re-evaluation of current gun legislation.

Pickett is concerned with the enormous amount of gun violence that takes place on a daily basis and, as a black man, he has a level of fear that is predicated on the current socio-political climate of America and the nation’s gun laws. The premise of his work is to initiate dialogue among the many perspectives related to gun rights with the hope that a reasonable mediation can be reached. His guns are surrogates for the real thing.

“Initially these objects were in response to gun violence towards African-Americans; however, my work has expanded to gun violence against all humans. My goal is for my practice to be a medium of activism through interdisciplinary methods and community collaborations,” says Pickett. “My practice has extended to the community through neighborhood art camps and community art projects. This community participation along with my reimagined ready-mades is an attempt to bring about cultural sensitivity and cross-cultural awareness. I’m convinced that people are more receptive to new and alternative theories concerning social change when they are comfortable and less threatened.”

ABOUT THE ARTIST
In addition to being a working artist, Pickett is currently Director of The Jaye Rock Cultural Center in Clovis, NM, which he also founded. He received his Master of Education in 2008 and his Bachelor of Fine Arts in 2000 from Eastern New Mexico University. He will receive his MFA in 2017 from the Vermont College of Fine Art, Vermont. He has exhibited his work in cities throughout the US and is a recipient of the International Sculpture Center’s 2017 Outstanding Student Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Award.

Central Features Contemporary Art 

Nike air jordan Sneakers | Nike for Men

Alumna Damali Abrams and Naomi Elena Ramirez and Faculty Co-Chair Dalida MarÍa Benfield in NYC

MIGRATORY TIMES/EMBODIED SPACES: TWO PROVOCATIONS + A WORKSHOP.

Migratory Times/Embodied Spaces will center performance works by Naomi Elena Ramirez (NYC) and the collective Diásporas Críticas (Barcelona/Guayaquíl) as transformative pedagogical interventions that open the space of a collaborative workshop to produce collective articulations of (dis)occupying spaces, disidentifications, (re)embodiment, radiofonization, and sonic translocalization, in migratory times.

This event contributes to Migratory Times, a year long global art, research, and pedagogical initiative that facilitates translocal and transnational decolonial feminist dialogues on displacements and migration through cultural interventions, workshops, and publications. Migratory Times is a project of the Institute of (im)Possible Subjects, a transnational feminist art, media and research collective, and is made possible in part with a Community Arts Fellowship from the Abundance Foundation.

ponga cuerpo donde boca

choreographed and performed by Naomi Elena Ramirez

sound design by Naomi Elena Ramirez sounds: excerpt from “Two Woman” by Anonymous; excerpt of speech by Fred Hampton of the Black Panther Party; excerpt of speech by Angela Davis ‘How Does Change Happen?’; Manu Chao, EZLN…Para Todos Todo

As the fog of imagined democracy dissipates how does one prepare oneself for the necessary sacrifices of activism, dissent, and the push for concrete change? When our bodies are on the line, what can we do to encourage ourselves to fight? I ask this of myself because I think the fight is only going to get uglier. ponga cuerpo donde boca responds to these questions through movement explorations of gestures from protest, moving through fear, finding strength in resilience, and dancing to sustain agency of resistance.

Llamando el mago

Diasporas Críticas

Llamando el mago is a live new media work that explores a “crisis of presentation” in an image saturated public sphere conditioned by techniques of surveillance that order the routes and experiences of transmission between metropolis and colony. Departing from the essay of the same title (“Calling the Magician”) by Aime Cesaire, Llamando el mago traverses censorship and media exoticisation, bureaucracy and coloniality, surveillance and polarisation, towards a meditation on decolonisation as a sophisticated anti-racist program that includes political, aesthetic and epistemic freedom of movement.

Naomi Elena Ramirez is a multidisciplinary artist whose work encompasses visual art, video art, performance art, and contemporary dance. Naomi uses photography and drawing as choreographic method, creating experimental scores from which live performance is made. Naomi has an MFA in Visual Art from Vermont College of Fine Arts and a BA in Dance from the University of California at Berkeley. Her work has been presented by Movement Research at The Judson Church; DoublePlus at Gibney Dance; The Bronx Latin American Art Biennial; Nurture Art Gallery; Wallplay Gallery; The Situation Room, LA; Gallery 107, North Adams, MA; Arte Nuevo InteractivA, Mérida, Mexico; Northwestern University’s Performance Studies Conference In Bodies We Trust; New Voices in Live Performance at The Center for Performance Research; amongst others. She is a recipient of the A.I.R. Gallery Fellowship for 2016/2017. She lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. (b. Hermosillo, Mexico) www.naomielenaramirez.com

Diásporas críticas is an open platform for artistic research. Diásporas críticas research explores and responds to the ways in which nationalisms intervene through micro-process to affect the body and the senses, researching notions of “transmission” and “contagion” in relation to mass media and technology as well as medical discourses and disease. They have received various research and production grants from academic and arts institutions. Throughout 2017 Diasporas criticas are preparing a research project entitled “Contralecturas Tropicales”. They are thinking: climate, cliche, sickness, poetic trope, surrealist dream, melodrama, medical theory, compass, geopolitical sex fantasy, cyclical time and exile.http://cargocollective.com/diasporascriticas

Damali Abrams the Glitter Priestess is a project-based artist born and raised in NYC by Guyanese parents. She constructs spaces and experiences of fantasy and myth, using collage, video installation and performance, that explore Black Utopia through the lenses of Afrofuturism and Afro-Caribbean syncretic religions. She examines folklore and contemporary popular culture, placing them in dialogue with one another to create a site of liberation for the Black imagination, rejecting tragedy as the sole, dominant narrative of the Black experience. Damali earned a BA at NYU, an MFA at Vermont College of Fine Arts, and recently completed the Whitney Museum of American Art Independent Study Program. She has been a fellow at A.I.R. Gallery as well as with apexart in Seoul, South Korea. She has been an artist-in-residence at Fresh Milk (Barbados), Groundation Grenada, Jamaica Center for Arts and Learning, The Center for Book Arts, and LMCC on Governors Island.

damaliabrams.wordpress.com | GlitterPriestess

Dalida María Benfield, Ph.D., is a Latinx (Panamá/U.S.A.) media artist and researcher who produces video, installations, archives, artists’ books, workshops, and other pedagogical and communicative actions, across online and offline platforms and often, collectively. Her current work crosses the spaces of contemporary art, education, and media activism and social justice. She has co-founded numerous autonomous cultural organizations, popular education projects, and research networks. She is currently the co-founder of the transnational feminist platform, The Institute of (Im)Possible Subjects, for art, research, activist culture, and publishing. From 1994 – 2007, she was a member of the artists’ collective Video Machete, which created open access media centers and free workshops as a practice of liberatory pedagogy and media production with youth of color, LGBTQ youth, and recent immigrant youth. She is co-chair of the Visual Arts program at the Vermont College of Fine Arts and founding Program Director at the Center for Arts, Design, and Social Research. dalidamariabenfield.info

DATE AND TIME

Sat, June 24, 2017

7:30 PM – 9:30 PM EDT

Add to Calendar

LOCATION

GIBNEY DANCE

280 BROADWAY

STUDIO C

New York, NY 10007

View Map

Sport media | Nike Off-White

Alumna Nikki Juen Protest Performance at Trump Tower | Brick x Brick

Hyperallergic except:

“The performance kicked off not long after noon, when 10 women formed a line and joined hands at the back of a small area that had been designated the stage. They wore jumpsuits printed with black-and-white bricks, on top of which were laid colored panels containing texts such as “Bimbo” and “Grab her by the pussy” — all sexist words and phrases uttered by the US president. The women were part of Brick x Brick, a project begun at the Women’s March to form “human ‘walls’ against misogyny,” and they remained in place under the sweltering sun for the next hour and a half.”

To read full article, click here.spy offers | Nike Air Max 270

Alumnus Michael Ruiz @ San Diego Art Institute

SDAI is pleased to present “Extra-Ordinary Collusion”, an exhibition with twenty-three artist and scientist collaborations, curated by Chi Essary. The opening reception will take place at the San Diego Art Institute, 1439 El Prado, on Saturday, May 20 from 6pm-8pm. The exhibition will run though will run through July 2.

The popular misconception of San Diego as a sleepy beach town ignores the vibrant artist community and undermines the reality of San Diego’s cultural potential. San Diego is not only known as one of the top three biotech capitals in the world, thanks to the presence of research centers like the Salk, Scripps, and the Stanford Consortium, but it is uniquely situated next to the creative hotbed that is Tijuana. Extra-Ordinary Collusion celebrates this rich cultural heritage by fostering innovative exchange between two of San Diego’s great cultural strengths—our thriving scientific and artistic communities.

For this exhibition artists were paired with scientists from the Salk Institute and invited to tour the scientists’ labs and learn about their state-of-the-art research. Using this visit as the impetus for the exhibition, artists created new work based on their conversations and interactions with the scientists. The artists in Extra-Ordinary Collusion come from various disciplines including painting, sculpture, installation, new media, and conceptual art.

Participating artists and scientists are: Cooper Baker (with Jun Wu), Hugo Crosthwaite (with Laura Tan), Einar & Jamex de la Torre (with Amy Rommel), Thomas DeMello (with Carol Marchetto), TML Dunn (with Sreekanth “Shrek” Chalasani), David Fobes (with Tatyana Sharpee), Abbey Hepner (with Mike Avery), Debby & Larry Kline (with Saket Navlakha), Jessica McCambly (with Julie Law), Meegan Nolan (with Manching Ku), Arzu Ozkal (with Janelle Ayres), Philip Petrie (with Ahmet Denli), Irma Sofia Poeter (with Uri Manor), Iana Quesnell (with Corina Antal), Sasha Koozel Reibstein (with Beverly Emerson), Marisol Rendón (with Axel Nimmerjahn), Vincent Robles (with Chen-min Yeh), Michael Ruiz (with Paloma Martinez-Redondo), Ellen Salk (with Tom Albright), Shinpei Takeda (with Tom Albright), Maya VanderSchuit (with Antonio Currias), Vicki Walsh (with Alan Saghatelian), Melissa Walter (with Martin Hetzer) Also on display will be photographs by Josue Castro documenting the scientists in their laboratories.

Please also join us for a series of discussions with some of the artist/scientist teams in Extra-Ordinary Collusion:

Thursday, June 8th, 7pm-9pm ($10, includes appetizers and refreshments) Location: Park 6, 590 Fir Street, San Diego, CA 92101
Vicki Walsh with Alan Saghatelian from the Clayton Foundation Laboratories for Peptide Biology, Einar & Jamex de la Torre with Amy Rommel from the Laboratory of Genetics—Verma, and Abbey Hepner with Mike Avery from John Reynold’s Lab

Wednesday, June 28th, 6pm-8pm ($5, cash bar) Location: San Diego Art Institute, 1439 El Prado, San Diego, CA 92101
Marisol Rendón with Axel Nimmerjahn from the Waitt Advanced Biophotonics Center, David Fobes with Tatyana Sharpee from the Computational Neurobiology Laboratory, and TML Dunn with Sreekanth “Shrek” Chalasani from the Molecular Neurobiology LaboratorySport media | NIKE Chaussures, Sacs, Vetements, Montres, Accessoires, Accessoires-textile, Beaute, Sous-vetements – Livraison Gratuite

Winter 2017 Grads

ADP170131_6099

Holly Britt

ADP170131_6153

Simone Spruce-Torres

ADP170131_6244

Lillie Grace

ADP170201_6263

Vicki Knipp

ADP170201_6343

Lori Victor

ADP170201_6384

Guy Coffin

ADP170201_6405

Jon Chapman

ADP170202_6541

Moksha Sommer

ADP170202_6637

Luann Bice

Best jordan Sneakers | Nike

Residency Public Events | 2017

The MFA in Visual Art program would like to invite the community to join us for presentations with our Visiting Artists, as well as student exhibitions, January 28 through February 3.

Graduating Student Exhibition – VCFA Gallery

  • Tuesday, January 31 – Friday, February 3. Hours: 9am-6pm. Gallery may be closed for critiques and reviews as determined by the program.
  • Opening: Monday, January 30, 8-9:30pm, VCFA Gallery

The daily exhibitions are free and open to the public most days. Please be considerate of critique groups and closures as needed for academic purposes.

New and Returning Student Exhibitions – Alumni Hall

  • Sunday, January 29 – Friday, February 3. Hours: 9am-6pm.
  • Opening: Saturday, January 28, 7-8:30pm, Alumni Hall

Gallery may be closed for critiques and reviews as determined by the program.

Visiting Artists Presentations:

Art, Place and Place-making
  • Sunday, January 29, 10:30am to noon,  College Hall Chapel
  • Artist-in-Residence, Mildred Beltré, will discuss her practice.

Mildred BeltreMildred Beltré, is a Brooklyn-based artist, mother, and popular educator working in print, drawing, and participatory politically engaged practice to explore facets of social change. She is interested in exploring political movements and their associated social relations and structures. Her most recent work involves looking at revolutionary theorizing and posturing through a feminist lens.

Beltré’s selected national exhibitions include: International Print Center New York, NYC; Burlington City Arts, Burlington, VT; Five Myles Gallery, Brooklyn, NY; BRIC, Brooklyn, NY; Smack Mellon, Brooklyn, NY; Freedman Gallery, Albright College, Reading, PA; University of Colorado, Boulder, CO; Art in General, NYC ; and international group shows at Projecto Ace, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Hollar Gallery, Prague, Czech Republic; Brun Leglise Gallery, Paris, France; among others.

Her work is included in the Special Collections of the Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY, and the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN, among others.

She has been awarded residencies at the Lower East Side Printshop, the Vermont Studio Center, and the Santa Fe Art Institute. She has received grants from the New York Foundation for the Arts, the Brooklyn Arts Council,  Brooklyn Foundation, and the Rema Hort Foundation, among others.

Beltré is the co-founder of the Brooklyn Hi-Art! Machine, an ongoing socially engaged collaborative art project in Crown Heights, Brooklyn that addresses gentrification and community building through art-making.

Waiting/Welcome
  • Sunday, January 29, 7pm, College Hall Chapel
  • A poetic meditation/reading/screening performed by MFA in Visual Art faculty, Viet Le and Faith Wilding with slides of images of colonial subjects from National Geographic, rephotographed and titled by faculty member, Michelle Dizon. A discussion with the audience follows.
Brooklyn Hi-Art! Machine: Community and Collaboration
  • Wednesday, February 1, 1-2:30pm, Chapel, College Hall
  • Artist-in-Residence, Mildred Beltré, and her collaborator, Visiting Artist Oasa DuVerney, will discuss their collaborative work.

Mildred and OasaThe Brooklyn Hi-Art! Machine is a socially-engaged project started in 2010 by artists Mildred Beltré and Oasa DuVerney. Dubbing ourselves the “Official Unofficial Artists in Residence” of our block, we set up tents, tables, and art supplies on the street outside our apartment building and invited anyone walking by to stop and make art with us. In this way we co-founded the Brooklyn Hi-Art! Machine (BHAM), a collaborative public art intervention that explores art-making as a community-building tool.

Often when a neighborhood is undergoing rapid change, outdoor space is criminalized for some while being preserved for others. One thing that the BHAM seeks to do in its insistence to be outdoors, and particularly on the street, is about claiming the street as a generative space for people of color. Public and collective projects are a way of combating the social isolation that leads to suspicion amongst neighbors as opposed to cooperation. By engaging our neighbors on the street, we facilitate conversation and trust which is often lost when a community undergoes significant transition and upheaval. Our vision is to facilitate a public space for community members—often silenced by socio-economic circumstances—to get informed, feel empowered, create, and organize to take positive action.

As artists it is important to us to not create work solely for the gallery, but also to use our practice to make artwork with and for our community. By creating weavings and art activities on our sidewalks we provide a visible and participatory space for Crown Heights residents of all ages to see and interact with each other. These workshops serve as a creative outlet for our neighbors and provide an opportunity to engage with each other outside of the daily routine and thus encourage a new kind of interaction, one leading to new social relations based on mutual respect and understanding. The fence weavings provide an opening for that conversation amongst neighbors to begin.

Oasa DuVerney is a Brooklyn-based artist and mother, born in Queens, New York. Selected exhibitions include “The View From Nowhere,” Rush Arts Gallery, NYC (2016); “The Window and the Breaking of the Window,” Studio Museum in Harlem, NYC (2016); The Brooklyn Biennial, BRIC, Brooklyn NY (2016), “Crossing the Line,” Mixed Greens Gallery, NYC (2013); “March On!,” Brooklyn Academy Of Music (2013); “Through A Glass Darkly,” Postmasters Gallery, NYC (2012).

DuVerney was awarded the Rush Philanthropic Foundation Artist Residency (2016), Smack Mellon Studio Artist Residency (2014-2015) the LMCC Workspace program residency (2012-2013), Brooklyn Foundation Grant (2016) a grant from the Brooklyn Arts Council (2011), a grant award from the Citizens Committee For New York City (2010, 2013), and the Aljra Emerge Fellowship by the Aljira Center for Contemporary Art (2007).

Media and Publications include The Independent, UK (2016), PIX 11 News (2016), Hyperallergic (2015, 2016), The Guardian, UK (2015), Palestine News Network (2013), The New York Times (2012, 2011), and The New York Daily News (2010). She received her B.F.A. from the Fashion Institute of Technology and her M.F.A. from Hunter College, CUNY.

Visiting Artists/Scholars during the Visual Art residency:

Damali Abrams, Ujju Aggarwal, Eshrat Erfanian, Nils Karsten, Suzy Spence, Rodrigo Valenzuela, and John Willis.

Sportswear free shipping | Men's Sneakers

Alumnus Matthew Whitney Featured in “Expanded”

August 2012 alumnus Matthew Whitney’s work has been featured in Expanded, a blog focused on contemporary drawing practices.

Excerpt:

“I am interested in the process of movement, and my current work manifests in the everyday practice of walking. My means of contextualizing these everyday practices involves drawing on paper, considered a 2D medium. It’s a form of reverse-embodiment, in which the real encounter becomes charted by the 2D. I write and draw not just by pen and paper, but also by using GPS technology to record my paths through a landscape. In other words, I am able to write text and draw images into the urban grid by the direct action of walking. This integrates yet another space: that of the digital, and in which dimensional realm do we situate the digital? We call it the “virtual”, which can be both 2D and 3D, and also neither, as we encounter it on a screen or projection or hologram. A screen is flat, but pixels have mass, and what we are seeing is representations of binary information – ones and zeroes, which actually occur as electrical pulses. Is electricity flat? As we move, we blur categorizations of 2D and 3D space, for we never fully exist in one, and we never exist anywhere for long. Rather, we pass through spaces, always feeling our way. Movement is thought of as getting from point A to point B – be it in walking, riding the bus, gardening, making things, or even sitting still. The constant of durational time makes non-movement, or being static, an impossibility. A line is sometimes understood as a point moving through space. The extent of that point though can also be thought of as a line, for as you get closer, the point becomes larger, and in a sense can be reconstituted as a line. Thus perhaps a point also cannot be considered static.”

To read full article click here.

To see more of Matthew’s work, click here.Best Authentic Sneakers | Men's Sneakers