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Faculty Member Việt Lê in Queer Horizons | Center for Art and Thought

QUEER HORIZONS

Queer Horizons features the work of Asian American and Asian diasporic artists whose work envisions a queer future that unsettles the past, disrupts the present, and imagines new worlds beyond the limits of the horizon.

We take inspiration from José Esteban Muñoz, the late queer studies scholar, and his conception of a “not yet here.” As he explains in Cruising Utopia, the “not yet here” is a phenomenon of queer futurity that “allows us to see and feel beyond the quagmire of the present.”

Within the last ten years in the US, we have celebrated the legal recognition of same-sex marriage, the end of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” and the formal acceptance of gays in the military, and increased visibility of LGBTQ bodies and personalities in popular culture. In our present moment, however, LGBTQ rights, safety, and health care are increasingly under threat. Simultaneously, the current administration frames Asian American communities as “un-American,” the after tremors along old Yellow Peril fault lines. They are foreign, unassimilable, undocumented: Muslim “terrorists,” hordes of H1B visa techie taking over American jobs, or “model minority” students taking up too much space in classrooms.

However, the artists and works in Queer Horizons name a possibility beyond the “model minority”: as queer Asian American artists, they disrupt the model minority narrative defined by heteronormative notions of success. Each artist engages a non-linear temporality moving between pasts, presents, and futures, and each work gestures towards a queer history that we, as Queer Asian Americans, can excavate, (re)create, and (re)produce in our pasts, presents, and futures. For example, Greyson Hong’s Costco photos, Việt Lê’s productions of club scenes/ online performances, and Tina Takemoto’s unconventional short film all tell of an alternative past to inform a queer alternative future. As we think of these experiences at the intersections with undocumented status, foreignness, and Islamophobia, their highly experimental and queer aesthetic in storytelling suggests further radical potential.

It is in this dangerous political climate that the artists in Queer Horizons insist on claiming liminal and hybrid spaces and lives, queer collectivity, and intersectional solidarity. Embracing failure, misbehavior, non-normativity, and defiant joyfulness thus becomes a radical form of resistance. This is the kind of utopian horizon that we call forward. In the spirit of artist Jeffrey Augustine Songco’s video, “Let’s Dance America!”

Queer Horizons appears in conjunction with the publication of Laura Kina and Jan Christian Bernabe’s book, Queering Contemporary Asian American Art (University of Washington Press, 2017).

Curated by Jan Christian Bernabe and Laura Kina

Curatorial Assistant: Mads Le

Contributors: Anida Yoeu Ali, Sita Kuratomi Bhaumik, Kim Anno, Wafaa Bilal, Greyson Hong, Kiam Marcelo Junio, Việt Lê, Maya Mackrandilal, Zavé Martohardjono, Jeffrey Augustine Songco, Tina Takemoto, and Saya Woolfalk.

Contributors’ works are published in staggered waves from late-June to late-July 2017, after which the whole exhibition are archived permanently on CA+T’s website.

Special thanks to the Andy Warhol Foundation and the California Institute of Contemporary Arts for fiscal support.

 

 

Alumna Yukiyo Kawano | Suspended Moment | Los Alamos Performance

On the anniversary of the world’s first atomic test Suspended Moment, a sculpture installation and Butoh dance and poetry performance by Los Alamos native Allison Cobb, Hiroshima native Yukiyo Kawano, with Butoh choreography/dance by Meshi Chavez, soundscape by Lisa DeGrace, and video projections by Stephen A. Miller, will be performed in Los Alamos, NM.

At the center of the performance is a life-sized sculpture of the bomb dropped on Nagasaki in 1945, created by the artist Yukiyo Kawano. Yuki was born and raised in Hiroshima, a third-generation atomic bomb survivor. She creates her sculptures from WWII-era kimonos that belonged to her grandmother, and sews them together with her hair, melding the DNA of generations of atomic bomb survivors.

co-sponsored by
Los Alamos History Museum, Los Alamos/Japan Project, and Los Alamos County Library System. Funded in part by a grant from the New Mexico Intervention Fund of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Additional Funding: Kawano has received a Career Opportunity Grant award from the Oregon Arts Commission.

The performance takes place from 4-5:30 p.m. at Historic Fuller Lodge, 2132 Central Ave., Los Alamos, NM 87544.

Alumnus Ben C. Vitualla Solo Show @ Gallery Luperca Nashville

365 Days

Ben C. Vitualla

Curated By May Hwen

July 1-31

WeHo Crawl Reception

July 1 | 6-9 PM

East Side Project Space

July 1-31

Gallery Luperca is proud to partner with Sticky Rice Collective and curator May Hwen to present 365 Days: New Works by Ben C. Vitualla. Vitualla is the founder and curator of downtown Nashville’s Arcade-based Blend Studio.

Vitualla’s work in a range of mediums is a processing of and commentary on the socio-political environment.  He says, “The current state of our world and my experiences are topics on which I represent in my practice. Themes of politics, profiling minorities, and poverty are focuses I am interested in conveying in my work. My hope is that it will encourage dialogue and maybe understanding issue the world is facing.”

The show opens during the Wedgewood Houston Art Crawl from 6-9 PM on July 1 and runs through the end of the month. The opening reception, hosted by Sticky Rice Collective, will include food trucks created by Sticky Rice alums parked outside.

For further information, artist biography, and images, please contact the gallery.

Gallery Luperca | East Side Project Space | 507 Hagan St. | Nashville, TN 37203

615-669-1384| [email protected] | www.galleryluperca.com

Gallery hours: W-R 2-8  Sun 4-7  | Every First Saturday 6-9 PM

MFA Candidate Corey Pickett @ Central Features Contemporary Art

Corey Pickett: Blank Cartridge

Reception: July 8, 6:00 to 8:00 pm.m
Blank Cartridge is an exhibition of provocative new sculptures by Clovis based-artist Corey Pickett. This series of artworks serves as an appeal for “common-sense” gun laws and the re-evaluation of current gun legislation.

Pickett is concerned with the enormous amount of gun violence that takes place on a daily basis and, as a black man, he has a level of fear that is predicated on the current socio-political climate of America and the nation’s gun laws. The premise of his work is to initiate dialogue among the many perspectives related to gun rights with the hope that a reasonable mediation can be reached. His guns are surrogates for the real thing.

“Initially these objects were in response to gun violence towards African-Americans; however, my work has expanded to gun violence against all humans. My goal is for my practice to be a medium of activism through interdisciplinary methods and community collaborations,” says Pickett. “My practice has extended to the community through neighborhood art camps and community art projects. This community participation along with my reimagined ready-mades is an attempt to bring about cultural sensitivity and cross-cultural awareness. I’m convinced that people are more receptive to new and alternative theories concerning social change when they are comfortable and less threatened.”

ABOUT THE ARTIST
In addition to being a working artist, Pickett is currently Director of The Jaye Rock Cultural Center in Clovis, NM, which he also founded. He received his Master of Education in 2008 and his Bachelor of Fine Arts in 2000 from Eastern New Mexico University. He will receive his MFA in 2017 from the Vermont College of Fine Art, Vermont. He has exhibited his work in cities throughout the US and is a recipient of the International Sculpture Center’s 2017 Outstanding Student Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Award.

Central Features Contemporary Art 

Alumna Damali Abrams and Naomi Elena Ramirez and Faculty Co-Chair Dalida MarÍa Benfield in NYC

MIGRATORY TIMES/EMBODIED SPACES: TWO PROVOCATIONS + A WORKSHOP.

Migratory Times/Embodied Spaces will center performance works by Naomi Elena Ramirez (NYC) and the collective Diásporas Críticas (Barcelona/Guayaquíl) as transformative pedagogical interventions that open the space of a collaborative workshop to produce collective articulations of (dis)occupying spaces, disidentifications, (re)embodiment, radiofonization, and sonic translocalization, in migratory times.

This event contributes to Migratory Times, a year long global art, research, and pedagogical initiative that facilitates translocal and transnational decolonial feminist dialogues on displacements and migration through cultural interventions, workshops, and publications. Migratory Times is a project of the Institute of (im)Possible Subjects, a transnational feminist art, media and research collective, and is made possible in part with a Community Arts Fellowship from the Abundance Foundation.

ponga cuerpo donde boca

choreographed and performed by Naomi Elena Ramirez

sound design by Naomi Elena Ramirez sounds: excerpt from “Two Woman” by Anonymous; excerpt of speech by Fred Hampton of the Black Panther Party; excerpt of speech by Angela Davis ‘How Does Change Happen?’; Manu Chao, EZLN…Para Todos Todo

As the fog of imagined democracy dissipates how does one prepare oneself for the necessary sacrifices of activism, dissent, and the push for concrete change? When our bodies are on the line, what can we do to encourage ourselves to fight? I ask this of myself because I think the fight is only going to get uglier. ponga cuerpo donde boca responds to these questions through movement explorations of gestures from protest, moving through fear, finding strength in resilience, and dancing to sustain agency of resistance.

Llamando el mago

Diasporas Críticas

Llamando el mago is a live new media work that explores a “crisis of presentation” in an image saturated public sphere conditioned by techniques of surveillance that order the routes and experiences of transmission between metropolis and colony. Departing from the essay of the same title (“Calling the Magician”) by Aime Cesaire, Llamando el mago traverses censorship and media exoticisation, bureaucracy and coloniality, surveillance and polarisation, towards a meditation on decolonisation as a sophisticated anti-racist program that includes political, aesthetic and epistemic freedom of movement.

Naomi Elena Ramirez is a multidisciplinary artist whose work encompasses visual art, video art, performance art, and contemporary dance. Naomi uses photography and drawing as choreographic method, creating experimental scores from which live performance is made. Naomi has an MFA in Visual Art from Vermont College of Fine Arts and a BA in Dance from the University of California at Berkeley. Her work has been presented by Movement Research at The Judson Church; DoublePlus at Gibney Dance; The Bronx Latin American Art Biennial; Nurture Art Gallery; Wallplay Gallery; The Situation Room, LA; Gallery 107, North Adams, MA; Arte Nuevo InteractivA, Mérida, Mexico; Northwestern University’s Performance Studies Conference In Bodies We Trust; New Voices in Live Performance at The Center for Performance Research; amongst others. She is a recipient of the A.I.R. Gallery Fellowship for 2016/2017. She lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. (b. Hermosillo, Mexico) www.naomielenaramirez.com

Diásporas críticas is an open platform for artistic research. Diásporas críticas research explores and responds to the ways in which nationalisms intervene through micro-process to affect the body and the senses, researching notions of “transmission” and “contagion” in relation to mass media and technology as well as medical discourses and disease. They have received various research and production grants from academic and arts institutions. Throughout 2017 Diasporas criticas are preparing a research project entitled “Contralecturas Tropicales”. They are thinking: climate, cliche, sickness, poetic trope, surrealist dream, melodrama, medical theory, compass, geopolitical sex fantasy, cyclical time and exile.http://cargocollective.com/diasporascriticas

Damali Abrams the Glitter Priestess is a project-based artist born and raised in NYC by Guyanese parents. She constructs spaces and experiences of fantasy and myth, using collage, video installation and performance, that explore Black Utopia through the lenses of Afrofuturism and Afro-Caribbean syncretic religions. She examines folklore and contemporary popular culture, placing them in dialogue with one another to create a site of liberation for the Black imagination, rejecting tragedy as the sole, dominant narrative of the Black experience. Damali earned a BA at NYU, an MFA at Vermont College of Fine Arts, and recently completed the Whitney Museum of American Art Independent Study Program. She has been a fellow at A.I.R. Gallery as well as with apexart in Seoul, South Korea. She has been an artist-in-residence at Fresh Milk (Barbados), Groundation Grenada, Jamaica Center for Arts and Learning, The Center for Book Arts, and LMCC on Governors Island.

damaliabrams.wordpress.com | GlitterPriestess

Dalida María Benfield, Ph.D., is a Latinx (Panamá/U.S.A.) media artist and researcher who produces video, installations, archives, artists’ books, workshops, and other pedagogical and communicative actions, across online and offline platforms and often, collectively. Her current work crosses the spaces of contemporary art, education, and media activism and social justice. She has co-founded numerous autonomous cultural organizations, popular education projects, and research networks. She is currently the co-founder of the transnational feminist platform, The Institute of (Im)Possible Subjects, for art, research, activist culture, and publishing. From 1994 – 2007, she was a member of the artists’ collective Video Machete, which created open access media centers and free workshops as a practice of liberatory pedagogy and media production with youth of color, LGBTQ youth, and recent immigrant youth. She is co-chair of the Visual Arts program at the Vermont College of Fine Arts and founding Program Director at the Center for Arts, Design, and Social Research. dalidamariabenfield.info

DATE AND TIME

Sat, June 24, 2017

7:30 PM – 9:30 PM EDT

Add to Calendar

LOCATION

GIBNEY DANCE

280 BROADWAY

STUDIO C

New York, NY 10007

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Alumna Nikki Juen Protest Performance at Trump Tower | Brick x Brick

Hyperallergic except:

“The performance kicked off not long after noon, when 10 women formed a line and joined hands at the back of a small area that had been designated the stage. They wore jumpsuits printed with black-and-white bricks, on top of which were laid colored panels containing texts such as “Bimbo” and “Grab her by the pussy” — all sexist words and phrases uttered by the US president. The women were part of Brick x Brick, a project begun at the Women’s March to form “human ‘walls’ against misogyny,” and they remained in place under the sweltering sun for the next hour and a half.”

To read full article, click here.

Faculty Member Cauleen Smith @ Art Institute of Chicago

Human_3.0 Reading List

Through October 29, 2017
Gallery 124

Museum Hours

Open daily 10:30–5:00
Thursday until 8:00

Newspapers, magazines, and websites frequently offer lists: the 10 best new restaurants, the 50 top places to see in the world, the 100 best movies of all time. Chicago-based artist Cauleen Smith (American, born 1967) has created another kind of list, a new canon of humanistic literacy presented as a series of drawings. Titled Human_3.0 Reading List, the project represents a new dimension of Smith’s work, one that engages with the idea of a collective consciousness through manually drawn renderings of book covers.

In this series of 57 drawings—each produced on 8½ × 12- inch graph paper in watercolor over graphite, occasionally elaborated with acrylic—the artist proposes a selection of books that is both personal, conveyed by the frequent inclusion of fingers or a thumb shown holding up a given book, and idiosyncratic. Harriet Tubman, C. L. R. James, and bell hooks find their place alongside Starfish, Sea Urchins, and Their Kin by Nelson Herwig. Together the drawings ask challenging questions: Have you read these books? Will you read these books? What will they mean to you? What do they mean to us now? Which titles might be missing?

An artist whose primary discipline is film, Smith has incorporated various influences and references in her images—science fiction, the black diaspora, and the lyrical potential of landscape. She first garnered national recognition with her feature-length film Drylongso (1998), which she completed during her graduate training at UCLA’s film school. In 2010, Smith moved to Chicago, where her work has grown increasingly site-specific and engaged in social activism. She created the Solar Flare Arkestral Marching Band Project, which has organized flash-mob appearances of a marching band composed of youth groups from the city’s South Side. This and other recent works have explicitly invoked the legacy of pioneering composer and performer Sun Ra, whose music and elaborate self-defining mythology also propelled the broader artistic movement of Afrofuturism.

Grounded in a sober assessment of race relations and institutional power structures, Human_3.0 Reading List calls its viewers to prepare for social change through self-empowered education. In the final words of the manifesto accompanying the series, Smith exhorts her audience: “Love. Resist. Read on. Right on.”

Sponsors

Support for this exhibition is provided by the Print and Drawing Club of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Cauleen Smith. Wild Seed, from Human_3.0 Reading List, 2015. Promised gift of Helen and Sam Zell.

Co-Chair Dalida María Benfield Collaborates In Barcelona

INTERSECTION | INTERVENTION | INTERPLAY
Gender, Collaboration and Counter-Memory in Migratory Times and Spaces

An afternoon intersecting interventions focused on technologies of collaboration to reimagine gender, history, memory, futures, and communities, with the collective projects Diasporas Críticas, Migratory Times, and the Museum of Random Memory.

Using as a taking off point the decolonial feminist philosopher María Lugones’ phrase “playfulness, world traveling and loving perception,” the public is invited to engage in these art based research projects that explore these actions as forms of reimagining and remaking social relations.

Date

May 31, 2017
15:00 – 19:30 p.m.

Place
Museu del Disseny de Barcelona
Floor -1 – Room B

Conducted by
The Museum of Random Memory/futuremaking.space
Diasporas Críticas and Migratory Times
the Institute of (im)Possible Subjects

 

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PROGRAMME

15:00 – 16:30The Museum of Random Memory
Conducted by MoRM: Museum of Random Memory/futuremaking.space

“Do you have something you would like to remember? Something you think should be forgotten? We would like you to contribute to our temporary permanent collection.”

What is a memory?
What is it good for?
How do we remember?
How do we forget?

These are a few of the questions that are asked by the participants and creators of the Museum of Random Memory, an ongoing practice-based research project. The project and the work of the project (the creation of the archive and the museum itself) represent a deliberate attempt to directly engage difficult questions of ownership, archive, preservation, and mediation. What does it mean to take ownership of a memory? What can we do with it? What should we do with it? What do we do with it? How do we proceed and where do the lines of the analog and the digital collide with the lines of public, private, hidden and revealed? How do you build (and destroy) a museum in days? What is gained and what is lost?

For this event we, the UnCurators, will perform an iteration of the Museum.
Attendees will be invited to participate by submitting memories and engaging in the intake process.

16:30 – 17:00 – Coffee Break

17:00 – 18:30 Exercise in Radiofonization
Conducted by Diasporas Críticas & Migratory Times/the Institute of (im)Possible Subjects

This workshop is directed at trans-feminist artists, activists and poets with the aim of sharing research around the process of creating a manifesto, enunciation and the practices, histories and metaphors associated with radio, we propose an “exercise in radiofonization”. Part workshop and part performance of a radio recording-studio, this session puts into practice a range of pedagogical and affective techniques in the fields of voice, enunciation and reading.

This space offers an encounter with various enunciation tactics and invites participants to co-produce a performative “exercise in radiofonization”. Depending on the technical capabilities this can be emitted in connection with other online, free or community radios, or recorded for a future transmission. “Exercise in radiofonization” focuses on the transdiscursive and transtemporal conditions of the feminist and decolonial manifesto and how, like the apparatus of radio, it makes a curious incision across the literary, historical, political and artistic; past present and future.

18:30 – 19:30 – Roundtable discussion
With Dalida María Benfield, Anyely Marin Cisneros, Rebecca Close and Annette Markham.

 

BIOS

THE MUSEUM OF RANDOM MEMORY/futuremaking.space

The Museum was first conceived and performed in March 2016 at the CounterPlay Festival held in Aarhus. Over the following year, key participants transformed the ideas into a conceptual framework, which guided the creation of the second instantiation of the museum, presented again at the same festival in March 2017.  The museum is the sum of the efforts of more than a dozen artists, activists, academics, researchers and students working with the Creating Future Memories project at Aarhus University in Denmark. The Creating Future Memories project is one of the projects of the futuremaking.space, a transdisciplinary space for research and public engagement.

 DIASPORAS CRITICAS

Diásporas críticas is an open platform for artistic research. Diásporas críticas research explores and responds to the ways in which nationalisms intervene through micro-process to affect the body and the senses, researching notions of “transmission” and “contagion” in relation to mass media and technology as well as medical discourses and disease. They have received various research and production grants from academic and arts institutions. Throughout 2017 Diasporas criticas are preparing a research project entitled “Contralecturas Tropicales”. They are thinking: climate, cliche, sickness, poetic trope, surrealist dream, melodrama, medical theory, compass, geopolitical sex fantasy, cyclical time and exile.

MIGRATORY TIMES/THE INSTITUTE OF (IM)POSSIBLE SUBJECTS
Migratory Times is a global art, research, and education initiative to facilitate transnational dialogues on displacements and migration. Migratory Times constructs a translocal architecture for overlapping learning, research, and making circles across diverse sites including Bogotá, Colombia; Aarhus and Copenhagen, Denmark; Jeju and Seoul, S. Korea; Manila, Philippines; Barcelona, Spain; and Los Angeles, Salt Lake City, Detroit, and New York City, USA. Over the course of a year, 2016-17, cultural interventions, workshops, and publications are being produced in local sites as well as through virtual networks, using popular education and co-design strategies. Migratory Times is a project of the Institute of (im)Possible Subjects, a transnational feminist art, media and research collective.

 

Free entry.
Required Registration. Send us an email to: [email protected]
http://d-future.net

Contact:
[email protected]
+34 93 326 3470

 

Organized by:

 

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D-Future Project/Mediaccions

 

In collaboration with:

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The Museum of Random Memory

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Migratory Times/the Institute of (im)Possible Subjects

Diasporas Críticas

 

Sponsored by:

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Ministerio de Economía y competitividad de España (Ref. CSO2014-58196-P)

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Museu del Disseny de Barcelona

 

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Estudis d’Art I Humanitats de la Universitat Oberta de Catalunya

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Future Making Research Consortium

Featured image: Diasporascriticas

Three Visual Art Alumni Collaborate in Minneapolis

Friendship is Magic is a collaborative site-specific installation created by artist friends Clea Felien, Damali Abrams the Glitter Priestess, and Ambivalently Yours. The show explores how the enthusiasm, language and rituals of girl culture can be used to represent ideas of friendship as a radical act of resistance in a political climate that is increasingly promoting xenophobia and separatism. In a world where adults are encouraged to cultivate potentially beneficial business connections instead of friendship, what does it mean to celebrate friendship instead?

For one weekend, the three artists from Minneapolis, Montreal, and New York will gather at Spackle Cat Gallery (Northrup King Building Studio 358, 1500 Jackson St NE, Minneapolis) to create an interdisciplinary alternate world where friendship itself is a form of magic.

HOURS:
Friday, May 19th – 5:00-10:00 p.m.
Saturday, May 20nd – 2:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m.
Sunday, May 21st – Noon-5:00 p.m.

 

  • May 19 – May 21
    May 19 at 5 PM to May 21 at 5 PM EDT
  • Spackle Cat Gallery, Northrup King Building, Studio 358, 1500 Jackson St NE, Minneapolis, MN 55413

Alumnus Michael Ruiz @ San Diego Art Institute

SDAI is pleased to present “Extra-Ordinary Collusion”, an exhibition with twenty-three artist and scientist collaborations, curated by Chi Essary. The opening reception will take place at the San Diego Art Institute, 1439 El Prado, on Saturday, May 20 from 6pm-8pm. The exhibition will run though will run through July 2.

The popular misconception of San Diego as a sleepy beach town ignores the vibrant artist community and undermines the reality of San Diego’s cultural potential. San Diego is not only known as one of the top three biotech capitals in the world, thanks to the presence of research centers like the Salk, Scripps, and the Stanford Consortium, but it is uniquely situated next to the creative hotbed that is Tijuana. Extra-Ordinary Collusion celebrates this rich cultural heritage by fostering innovative exchange between two of San Diego’s great cultural strengths—our thriving scientific and artistic communities.

For this exhibition artists were paired with scientists from the Salk Institute and invited to tour the scientists’ labs and learn about their state-of-the-art research. Using this visit as the impetus for the exhibition, artists created new work based on their conversations and interactions with the scientists. The artists in Extra-Ordinary Collusion come from various disciplines including painting, sculpture, installation, new media, and conceptual art.

Participating artists and scientists are: Cooper Baker (with Jun Wu), Hugo Crosthwaite (with Laura Tan), Einar & Jamex de la Torre (with Amy Rommel), Thomas DeMello (with Carol Marchetto), TML Dunn (with Sreekanth “Shrek” Chalasani), David Fobes (with Tatyana Sharpee), Abbey Hepner (with Mike Avery), Debby & Larry Kline (with Saket Navlakha), Jessica McCambly (with Julie Law), Meegan Nolan (with Manching Ku), Arzu Ozkal (with Janelle Ayres), Philip Petrie (with Ahmet Denli), Irma Sofia Poeter (with Uri Manor), Iana Quesnell (with Corina Antal), Sasha Koozel Reibstein (with Beverly Emerson), Marisol Rendón (with Axel Nimmerjahn), Vincent Robles (with Chen-min Yeh), Michael Ruiz (with Paloma Martinez-Redondo), Ellen Salk (with Tom Albright), Shinpei Takeda (with Tom Albright), Maya VanderSchuit (with Antonio Currias), Vicki Walsh (with Alan Saghatelian), Melissa Walter (with Martin Hetzer) Also on display will be photographs by Josue Castro documenting the scientists in their laboratories.

Please also join us for a series of discussions with some of the artist/scientist teams in Extra-Ordinary Collusion:

Thursday, June 8th, 7pm-9pm ($10, includes appetizers and refreshments) Location: Park 6, 590 Fir Street, San Diego, CA 92101
Vicki Walsh with Alan Saghatelian from the Clayton Foundation Laboratories for Peptide Biology, Einar & Jamex de la Torre with Amy Rommel from the Laboratory of Genetics—Verma, and Abbey Hepner with Mike Avery from John Reynold’s Lab

Wednesday, June 28th, 6pm-8pm ($5, cash bar) Location: San Diego Art Institute, 1439 El Prado, San Diego, CA 92101
Marisol Rendón with Axel Nimmerjahn from the Waitt Advanced Biophotonics Center, David Fobes with Tatyana Sharpee from the Computational Neurobiology Laboratory, and TML Dunn with Sreekanth “Shrek” Chalasani from the Molecular Neurobiology Laboratory