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Winter 2018 MFA in Visual Art graduates!

 

Alumnus Linda King-Ferguson @ White Columns

White Columns Online ‘Stomach Acid Reflux’ curated by Ellie Rines

Stomach Acid Reflux, an online inventory that deals with the human body in a way that is somehow both grotesque and formally elegant.

Traditional themes–still life, formal abstraction–and traditional composition–symmetry, etc…– i.e. artistic practice of control is confounded by dysfunction and absurdity. Fake vomit on a scale, ketchup packets’ portrait, tits with nips carved out, tissuebox architecture, spray foam can ejaculation, dairy still life– all direct or subliminal hints to the disgusting bodily fluids resulting from the things we love and hate – sex, bodies, food. Everyday encounters, formalities, objects and commodities become subject to ridicule and admiration, sublimation and disgrace. Juxtapositions ferment and become putrid.

Sophia S Narett painstakingly needlepoints elaborate scenes from fantasy and illusion. In Something Went Wrong, orgies are juxtaposed to a series of women aimlessly wandering in ball gowns, a dead naked women lying on a fish tank. The composition is structured around crumbling architecture, barbed wire and a flank of female figures observing in confusion, disgust and ridicule.

Kurt Treeby knits an architectural model of Prentice Women’s Hospital then turns it into what feels like a beer coozy for a tissue box.

Linda King Fergusons surgical cuts yield formal absences. Though reminiscent of Lygia Clark or Polly Apfelbaum, the painting counteracts the joy of the colors with a sloughing off.

Diana Kingsley ’s dairy still life in a pink background. Entitling the work Well-rounded Wives evokes the low-level despair and boredom beneath the surface of a kitchen. Lactose overload.

Jennifer Sullivan features faux glitter vomit on a painted weight scale. Theatrical, humorous and a bit sinister.  From a “revenge body” series — the tableau lives up to the title.

Amy J Kligman ketchup packet still life. Curiously bulbous. Employing immense detail similar to the way Narrett does but much more laconic.

Robert Rhee in Coral uses a spray foam can to create a bizarre yellow foam shape. Rhee discusses “rubber necking” in his artist statement. This could have been another title for my online selection of works — looking at something gross and candid out of habit and curiosity.

Participating artists include:
Linda King Ferguson
Diana Kingsley
Amy J Kligman
Sophia S Narrett
Robert Rhee
Jennifer Sullivan
Kurt Treeby

Ellie Rines is founder of 56 Henry gallery and a director of Ceysson & Bénétière.

For more information: registry.whitecolumns.org

 

featured image: Linda King Ferguson
Equivalence 60, 2016
Acrylic and stain
28 x 28 inches
Courtesy of the artist

 

Faculty Member Faith Wilding @ Western Exhibitions

Faith Wilding
Un-Natural Parables
November 3, 2017 – December 22, 2017
In Galleries One & Two

Western Exhibitions is thrilled to present a two-part solo exhibition, Un-Natural Parables, by pioneering feminist artist Faith Wilding. In Gallery 1, the gallery will present Natural Parables, a body of work last exhibited in 1985; large watercolor/drawing hybrids paired with oil-on-panel paintings shaped like pods. In Gallery 2 will be a new series of mixed-media watercolor paintings, Paraguay: Republica de la Soya, that reflect on the artist’s recent on-the-ground research into her birth country’s ongoing ecological crises. The show opens on Friday, November 3 with a reception from 5 to 8pm. The following day, Saturday, November 4, Wilding will be joined in conversation at the gallery by Shannon Stratton, the William and Mildred Lasdon Chief Curator at the Museum of Art and Design (NYC) at 4pm. Both the reception and the gallery talk are free and open to the public.

In 1941 Faith Wilding’s parents Edith and Harry Barron emigrated to Paraguay as members of the Bruderhof Anabaptist commune. Here, in a rural Bruderhof settlement, Wilding would be born and grow up with a rich relationship to a verdant environment, coupled with a communal upbringing where literature and music were as readily taught as animal husbandry and agriculture. Wilding has long mined this childhood in her work, grateful for a youth that was rich in community and ingenuity, but also deeply resistant to the strict gender norms and roles imposed by an otherwise quite radical Christian sect.

While well recognized for her early work co-organizing and exhibiting in Womanhouse and then later for her collaborative work with subRosa, Wilding’s robust painting and drawing practice has only recently been revisited. Truly the backbone of her practice, Wilding’s vivid works on paper often use imagery from nature as a metaphor for transformation. Her interest in exploring specific ideas of women’s transformation is as prominent as her inquiry into the metamorphosis of the natural world through human intervention and destruction. Wilding’s life-long examination of the body as political site and nature as political site marries an instinctive desire to reveal the ways in which humanity and the natural world are co-dependent. Her consistent commentary on humankind’s exploitation of the natural world and its subsequent weaponization anticipated art’s contemporary consideration of the Anthropocene as critical subject matter.

For Un-Natural Parables, Western Exhibitions will exhibit for the first time since 1985 Wilding’s Natural Parables series, originally produced in 1982 and last exhibited in Los Angeles. This work marked the culmination of years of Wilding’s early research into female mythologies, paganism, English Romantic poetry, illuminated herbals, bestiaries, alchemical manuscripts and female imagery. At the time she was seeking to create her own system of representation and illustrate an interconnection between beliefs, mythologies, dreams and fantasy worlds. Forty years later, Wilding made Paraguay: Republica de la Soya, a series that responds to the wanton destruction of Paraguay’s dense forests, verdant campos, meandering swamps and waterways through massive mono-cropping of GMO soy. With the help of an Art Matters grant, Wilding traveled back to Paraguay for the first time since emigrating in 1961 to study botanical collections and gardens. The resulting works on paper are part of a larger memoir project that Wilding is currently completing that reflects on her upbringing and her complex relationship to it.

Un-Natural Parables marries two distinct time periods in Wilding’s practice, connecting yet book-ending her early exploration and development of a feminist vernacular with the political concerns that emerged as part of a cyber-feminist practice that delved into reproductive biotech, labor, science and global capitalism. These two bodies of work are linked by Wilding’s continuous, sumptuous watercolor practice where captivating imagery and rich color vividly portray the fundamental inter-connection between humanity and the environment. This melding of the body with the earth through layering of washes, pencil, text, woven paper and occasionally collage, intensifies a message of connection, but also complicity – making it clear that environmental politics is not a “special interest”, but the politics of survival.

Faith Wilding is Professor Emerita of performance art at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, a graduate faculty member at Vermont College of Fine Arts, and a visiting scholar at the Pembroke Center, Brown University. Born in Paraguay, Wilding received her BA from the University of Iowa and her MFA from the California Institute of the Arts. Wilding was a co-initiator of the Feminist Art Programs in Fresno and at Cal Arts, and she contributed “Crocheted Environment” and her “Waiting” performance piece to the historic Womanhouse exhibition.

Her work has been exhibited extensively over the last five decades including the seminal survey WACK! Art and the Feminist Revolution, organized by Cornelia Butler, which traveled from the Museum of Contemporary Art (Los Angeles) to the National Museum of Women (Washington DC), PS1 Contemporary Art Center (Long Island), and the Vancouver Art Gallery.  Additionally, Wilding’s work has been exhibited at Reina Sofia Museum (Madrid); Centre for Contemporary Arts (Glasgow); Bronx Museum of Art (New York); The Whitney Museum of American Art (New York); the Armand Hammer Museum (Los Angeles); The Drawing Center (New York); Documenta X (Kassel); the Singapore Art Museum. Publications include By Our Own Hands: The History of the Women Artists Movement in Southern California, 1970-76 (Double X, 1977) and Domain Errors! Cyberfeminist Practices! (Autonomedia, 2003).  Wilding was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2009 and has been the recipient of two individual media grants from the National Endowment for the Arts.  In 2014, she was awarded the prestigious Women’s Caucus for Art Lifetime Achievement Award.   Most recently, her work was included in Fiber: Sculpture 1960 to Present exhibition that originated at the ICA in Boston; her Crocheted Environment, 1972/1995, was shown in Art_Textiles at The Whitworth Gallery in Manchester, England (and it graced the cover of the catalog); she currently has work in Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano L.A., organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, as part ofPacific Standard Time: LA/LA, up until December 31, 2017.

Faith Wilding’s work was recently the subject of a traveling retrospective, Fearful Symmetries, that featured a selection of works from her studio practice spanning the past forty years, highlighting a range of works on paper – drawings, watercolors, collage and paintings – exhibited together for the first time. Curated by Shannon Stratton and first presented at Threewalls in Chicago, the show traveled to Houston, Memphis and Los Angeles, where it was reviewed in the Los Angeles Times and LA Weekly and received a Critic’s Pick in Artforum. This is her first show at Western Exhibitions and her first in Chicago since the retrospective opened in 2014. Wilding lives and works in Providence, Rhode Island.

PRESS for “Un-Natural Parables”: Artnet | Chicago Reader | New City

Western Exhibitions
1709 W Chicago Ave
Chicago, IL 60622 USA
312.480.8390
[email protected]
 
Gallery hours
Tuesday thru Saturday
11am to 6pm
featured image:

VCFA MFA Visual Art Program | Open Call For Emerging Artist

The MFA in Visual Art program at Vermont College of Fine Arts is calling for emerging artists to participate in an upcoming online video festival called immigration | imagination.

The video exhibition will be juried by artist, curator, and MFA in Visual Art faculty member Việt Lê with support from VCFA. This is an opportunity for emerging visual artists with or without an MFA to participate in this unique online video festival.

The immigration | imagination exhibition asks artists to share their creative, critical, and community practices in response to the policing of borders and the ongoing vestiges of violence. Read more about the festival and theme on the submission page.

The submission deadline is Friday, December 8, 2017. Submissions must be no longer than six minutes in length. If an artist is submitting an excerpt, the complete piece must be no longer than 15 minutes. Only one submission per artist or collaborative group will be accepted. Submissions are accepted here.

Lê, who will jury the submissions, is a groundbreaking artist whose work has been featured in venues throughout the world. He has also published several books and anthologies. Based in Los Angeles, Lê is an Assistant Professor of Visual Studies at California College of Arts in addition to his faculty position at VCFA.

The immigration | imagination online video festival will debut on VCFA’s MFA in Visual Art program Vimeo page on January 5, 2018 at 4 p.m. Selected applicants also be included in the Pitzer College Art Gallery “Manifesto” exhibition in Southern California, which will take place January 20-March 23, 2018.

For more information on the online video festival, contact Thatiana Oliveira at [email protected] or (802) 828-8636.

Alumna Tania Kupczak @ Ghost Gallery, Seattle

11th Annual Holiday Mini Exhibit at Ghost Gallery in Seattle.

“not afraid of…
After being confronted last autumn with some very scary things, I started drawing images which named things I was NOT afraid of, in order to help calm myself and restore my sense of safety and power. The boxwood wreath is always the first drawn element, providing a safe circle to begin in. In the spirit of a tarot deck, this series now is named only with Roman numerals, since I hope that your individual interpretation will lead to meanings which have resonance with your current moment.”

“I’m a discourse surfer in theater, dance, film, and visual art. I do production design and set decoration for motion pictures, design sets for live performance as well as create title sequences. I draw and paint, and lately have started to learn how to bend neon. I enjoy collaboration. I believe that when they censor our words, visual art will be our path of resistance.”

The Ghost Gallery project was founded in December 2006 by independent curator/event planner Laurie Kearney.  She has curated and hosted art exhibits, auctions, benefits and music events at various venues over the past 11 years including the Pretty Parlor, Solo Bar, Saint John’s Bar & Eatery, Stylus Salon & Spa, Neumos, McLeod Residence, Rocco’s in Belltown, Capitol Hill Block Party, Havana, Edie’s Shoes and more.

Ghost Gallery acquired a unique brick & mortar space in Capitol Hill in April 2010. Come visit us! There is no entrance fee to see exhibits on view.

504 E Denny Way -look for the Pac-Man Arcade Park at Olive/E Denny!
(ENTER THROUGH GATE NEXT TO HILLCREST MARKET)

Hours:
Wed-Fri 11-7pm
Sat-Sun 11-6pm
Tue by Appt

Featured image:

Not Afraid Of: II
ink, acrylic on acid-free vellum
framed to 5″ x 7″

Alumna Thais Mather Solo Show @ Form & Concept

Thais Mather: Reckless Abandon

November 24, 2017-February 18, 2018

Reckless Abandon Events

Opening Reception | Friday, November 24, 2017 from 5-7 pm — RSVP on Facebook
Reckless Abandon: A Reading | Saturday, November 25, 2-3 pm — RSVP on Facebook
Reckless Abandon: Performance | Friday, December 15, 5-7 pm — RSVP on Facebook

“I think people are getting these catastrophic feelings, that this is the end,” says Thais Mather. “I don’t believe in that. I think this is a beginning.” The feminist artist’s new exhibition, Reckless Abandon, comes at a time of cultural, political and environmental upheaval. It’s an ideal moment to examine human history from a revolutionary stance—and present urgent questions that can reveal a new path forward. Through a monumental art installation and a series of performances and events, Mather will challenge viewers to abandon patriarchal structures in favor of a transcendent vision for humanity. Reckless Abandon opens at form & concept in Santa Fe on Friday, November 24, 2017, and runs through February 18, 2018.

“I’m really contemplating humanity: how culture began, where we are now, and where that might evolve,” says Mather. Reckless Abandon comprises hundreds of artworks that will fill form & concept’s ground floor, tracing thousands of years of natural and human history. Mather’s explorations for the show started with a series of large, intricate woodblock prints depicting octopuses, snakes, tarantulas and other creatures. These animals were traditionally vilified by humans because their anatomy is so different from our own, and because their consciousness seems alien. “They are considered ‘total others,’” says Mather. “I’m connecting these themes to the ways in which women have been misunderstood and colonized because we are always foreigners in our own land.”

From this departure point, Mather has created a number of large-scale installations that incorporate ceramics, videos, drawings and other media. Reckless Abandon is a culmination of Mather’s artistic experience thus far. She grew up in Santa Fe, and got her degree in printmaking from the University of Montana in 2006. In 2011, she enrolled as an MFA student at Vermont College of Fine Arts. There, her focus shifted from technical expertise to conceptual rigor as she studied installation, social practice and critical theory. Prominent feminist artists Faith Wilding and Michelle Dizon became her mentors.

After returning to Santa Fe in 2013, Mather furthered her studies of feminist theory and incorporated what she was learning in the bodies of work Wonder Bitch and The Anonymous Author. She exhibited both series in solo exhibitions in Houston, Texas, but initially struggled to find an audience for her work in the famous art market of her hometown. form & concept Gallery Director Frank Rose offered Mather an exhibition in fall 2016, and she’s been hard at work ever since.

“Thais’ multidisciplinary approach was a perfect fit for us,” says Rose. “We look for artists who are open to crossing perceived barriers between art, craft and design in service of powerful storytelling. Thais combs through eons of visual history, and emerges with imagery that disrupts entrenched narratives.”

Reckless Abandon is Mather’s first major show in Santa Fe, though she hesitates to call it a solo exhibition—at least in a traditional sense. “I feel like the concept of the male genius artist presenting his solo magnum opus is a Greenbergian farce. Everything you create is influenced by other artists, by your mentors, by your relationships, by the music and literature you adore.” Mather says. She’s working with a number of feminist artists to present a series of performances in the space, and also considers gallery visitors to be collaborators when they cross the show’s threshold. The exhibition will evolve through these contributions and interactions, inspiring community members to return multiple times and experience new surprises. Inspired by the magical realist movement, Mather aims to weave moments of enchanting transformation into everyday life.

Reckless Abandon is a call to action, not just for us to treat one another and our planet with care, but also for us to abandon what we think we know, in order to create a life of magic in the next phase of our evolution,” says Mather. The artist will answer her own challenge by donating the proceeds of several artworks from the show to nonprofit organizations that focus on social and environmental activism. “We will have to create the impossible if we plan to survive. So why not use our imagination—a force, which as the psychoanalyst Donald Winnicott taught me, is our prime source and mechanism of survival,” Mather says.

RSVP for opening weekend on Facebook.
Browse Thais Mather’s work.

Form & Concept

435 S Guadalupe St, Santa Fe, NM 87501| 505.982.8111

Alumnus Corey Pickett @ Form & Concept Benefit Show, Santa Fe

Guns to Art Benefit Show

November 7-17, 2017
Reception & Live Auction: Friday, November 17, 4-7 pm

RSVP on Facebook.

Decommissioned firearms aren’t the most pliable artistic medium, but that hasn’t stopped faculty and students at Santa Fe Community College from reshaping them into stunning artworks. They’ve been hard at work bending, slicing, shredding and melting old guns into sculptures, jewelry and even apparel. This fall, the art will appear at a special reception, live auction and silent auction in support of art and welding scholarships at SFCC and the 501(c)3 non-partisan organization New Mexicans to Prevent Gun Violence (NMPGV), along with juried works by artists from across the world that reflect on gun violence prevention. The Guns to Art Benefit Show runs November 7-17 at form & concept, with a reception and live auction on Friday, November 17 from 4 to 7 pm.

“When we first started, people would slam doors in our faces,” says Miranda Viscoli, co-founder and co-president of NMPGV. “They’d say, ‘You guys are not going to take our guns.’ This event is a culmination of our efforts to shift the conversation towards responsible gun ownership and gun violence prevention.” In August 2016, NMPGV launched a gun buyback program that invited gun owners to anonymously turn in unwanted firearms to New Mexico law enforcement. The Santa Fe Community College Art Department offered to turn part of the stockpile into art, and a collaboration with the Colorado-based RAWTools project called “Guns to Gardens” transformed the guns into gardening tools. Creations from both programs will appear in the live and silent auctions at the Guns to Art benefit.

NMPGV formed in 2013, the year of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. Not long after the tragedy, a group of concerned citizens came together to face some tough realities about gun violence in New Mexico. They learned that in 2013, the third leading cause of death for New Mexican children was homicide, with 74% of those deaths occurring by firearm. Faced with this troubling statistic and others like it, the group leapt into action, designing programs that could curb firearm injury and death and promote responsible gun ownership through public health, education, advocacy and public awareness efforts.

“Over the years, we’ve developed a multipronged approach to build trust in the community,” says Viscoli. “We know the police, we know local politicians on both sides of the aisle, we know the press, and we know community members.” The programs they’ve launched include Murals to End Gun Violence and the Student Pledge Against Gun Violence, both of which engage  Santa Fe public school students. Since these initiatives started, there has been a 54% drop in local students bringing weapons to school. NMPGV also maintains an interactive map documenting incidents of gun-related violence and death in every New Mexico county. “Guns to Gardens” and the collaboration with Santa Fe Community College are also ongoing projects.

“We love the way NMPGV takes an intersectional approach to their projects and programs,” says Frank Rose, Gallery Director at form & concept. “Guns to Art brings so many of these local stories together, and also invites artists from across the world to express powerful viewpoints on gun violence prevention.” The Guns to Art Benefit Show opens November 7, coinciding with the launch of an online and in-gallery silent auction. Bidding for the silent auction will continue during the Guns to Art reception on November 17, and a live auction moderated by Jake Lovato will also take place at the event.

NMPGV, SFCC and form & concept would like to thank Mayor Javier Gonzales, the City of Santa Fe and Santa Fe Police Chief Patrick Gallagher for their support of this exhibition.

Learn more about the reception & live auction.
Enter the Guns to Art juried show.

Form and Concept

435 S Guadalupe St, Santa Fe, NM 87501| 505.982.8111

 

Alumnus David French “Was/Is” exhibition @ JacksoNewark Gallery

Kristin J. DeAngelis has partnered with JacksoNewark Gallery to curate and present the works artist David French

David French‘s works are fluid gestures, yet frozen in time. But they appear as if it is still occurring. The opening and the show are at JacksoNewark Gallery at 650 Newark Street located inside Urban Consign & Design in Hoboken.

For more information on JacksoNewark Gallery, please feel free to follow on Facebook JacksoNewark Gallery or contact Paul D. Fitzgerald of Urban Consign & Design.

650 Newark Street
Hoboken, New Jersey 07307

Faculty Member Cauleen Smith in Artforum

The artist and filmmaker Cauleen Smith, who recently relocated from Chicago to Los Angeles, rarely tethers her work to bare reality. Her latest film, Triangle Trade, 2017—made in collaboration with Canadian artists Jérôme Havre and Camille Turner—renders three new, fantastical realms, inhabited only by the puppet likenesses of the work’s three creators. Triangle Trade is on view at Gallery TPW in Toronto until November 11, 2017.

TWO YEARS AGO, I visited Toronto to do a site visit at Gallery TPW, where I had been slated to have a solo exhibition. I wanted to make a film in the city for that show, so I started meeting with a lot of black artists living in Toronto, hoping to find a few collaborators. I became really intrigued by many of these artists’ ideas about blackness; I sensed a lot of frustration about how whenever black history or experience is discussed, it’s always from an American point of view. But there’s a long history of black people emigrating from the Caribbean to Canada, which seems to create a kind of double colonial consciousness—an echo in terms of belonging and not belonging.

Ultimately, I chose to collaborate with the performance and multimedia artist Camille Turner and the sculptor Jérôme Havre. So much of Camille’s work is made through a speculative, science-fiction lens, and she loves to use Afro-Futurist metaphors to talk about alienation. It became clear we’d be able to have a very natural conversation within a project. And I just thought Jérôme’s work was so fresh—I had never seen anything like it. He was making things that—to me—were, crucially, not like anything that an American artist would make.

For example, Magnifique Isolation, 2009, was a stunning installation that he made of small, distorted human figures that hung from the ceiling, suspended in midair. I can’t really think of any African American artist who would hang a body. That decision was so intriguing, because it shows how the weight of history always presses itself upon aesthetic decisions.

I have to stress that our film, Triangle Trade, is equally mine, Camille’s, and Jérôme’s. Each of our segments in the film function independently of one another, and our respective puppets never really engage in dialogue. Even the terrains and topographies of our separate segments remain really distinct, which might, in some way, be symptomatic of the black diasporic condition.

My segment takes place on a volcano. My puppet talks about how it’s impossible for anyone to claim one, because it’s literally made up of matter coming from the core of the earth. I’ve been thinking about that concept a lot lately, and about how North American land is completely soaked in blood. It’s become increasingly troubling to me, especially when I try to imagine futures or forms of liberation or justice.

New land seems necessary, but, of course, all the land everywhere has been claimed and colonized many times over. I thought about other planets, but there’s a strange colonial project in that too. So, really, the only place you can arrive at and settle in without doing harm is at a lava berg.

The terrain in Camille’s segment is a completely imaginary and allegorical world. It looks nothing like Earth, and she describes it only in magical terms, rather than empirical ones. Jérôme’s is an island, but, more than that, it’s a kind of meta-space or feeling—the feeling of being adrift. It was an important challenge to create Triangle Trade together without necessarily agreeing on what time or space we were in. I think that’s an interesting lesson on how to get along with people in general. You may not all have agreements on where, and when, and who we are.

 

Featured image: Jérôme Havre, Cauleen Smith, and Camille Turner, Triangle Trade, 2017, HD video, color, sound, 14 minutes 31 seconds.

Associated link.

Alumna and Curator Patricia Miranda: Fall Exhibitions, NYC

Patricia Miranda Fall Exhibitions and Events.
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Indigo: The Seventh Color
at LABspace 
Artists: Christine AaronBeth DaryGrace DeGennaroLorrie Fredette, Valerie Hammond, Mary HarkJeanne HeifetzLotta HellebergBrece HoneycuttPatricia MirandaPaula Overbay
Artist Reception – October 14, 5 – 7:30pm
On view October 14-November 4, 2017 

Last year a group of artists gathered at my studio for a weekend of Indigo dyeing. Lorrie Fredette and Brece Honeycutt were inspired to curate an exhibition – I am honored to show with these artists!

LABspace is located at 2462 NY Rt 23, Hillsdale, NY, 12529
Gallery Hours:  Saturday 11-5pm & Sunday 11-4pm

I had the wonderful honor to write the catalog essay for artist Lori Glavin‘s exhibition of paintings and collages at The George Gallery in Charleston SC.
“The juxtaposition of hard-edged collages and gestural paintings highlights Glavin’s central painterly concerns, lending the two genres a familial conviviality that might otherwise not be evident. Together they reveal an ongoing artistic dialogue in their penchant for awkward biomorphic shapes, unexpected overlap, crooked line, and masterful tertiary color….”
Read the full essay here.
www.loriglavin.com
Amazing powerhouse artist, publisher, artist advocate, and dear friend Sharon Louden will be a Visiting Lecturer at Lyme Academy on Thursday, October 19, talking about her new book in the series, Living and Sustaining a Creative Life: Cultural Producers. 

Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts, University of New Haven 
Thursday, October 19
Reception 5pm, Lecture 6pm

I will join Sharon after her lecture for a Q&A- it’s sure to be a lively one!

Tickets are $15, free for students. Purchase tickets here
Lyme Academy College is located at 84 Lyme Street, Old Lye CT. Directions here.
image: Sharon Louden; MERGE AT UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT, Oak Hall, at the University of Connecticut in Storrs, CT, 2013. Detail.

On November 7 I will introduce a double feature about the artists Yvonne Jacquette and Rudy Burckhardt, and lead a Q&A afterwards. The Kate Museum is  lovely theater with a full roster of programming and the film series always includes a lively discussion after, so please join me on November 7 and check out the other films.

Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts
Bridging the Arts Film Series
Tuesday, November 7, 5:30 p.m.
at the Katherine Hepburn Museum in Old Saybrook, CT.

The Kate Museum, 300 Main Street, Old Saybrook, CT 06475. Tickets $15 per film.
Bridging the Arts is a curated film series co-sponsored by Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts and the Kate. The series features a selection of art films produced by the highly-regarded Checkerboard Film Foundation and includes a brief lecture before each film.

In September I had a great time participating in 
CENTERPIECE: A Sculpture Garden & Music Pop-Up
a BombPop!Up Production
at Pete’s Candy Store in Brooklyn, NY.

Curated by the ever amazing duo Gaby Collins-Fernandez and Drea Cofield
with Leah Dixon, Sacha Ingber, Aaron Fowler, Leah Guadagnoli, Marie Lorenz, Tammy Nguyen, Patricia Miranda, Cal Siegel, Tom Simon, John Szlasa, Alina Tenser, Karen Tepaz, & Emmy Thelander. See photos here.

Bomb Pop! Up is a Brooklyn-based artist-run initiative producing pop-up Art & Music shows,  Brooklyn NY.

on-site installation: cochineal dyed doilies, twine, tree.