Posts

Alumna Nikki Juen in Pussy Party Collective Zine

This is Our Pussy Zine includes original artwork by Nikki Juen, Alex Bowman Ed Fella, Guts & Glory, ITWST, Lisa Junius, Kevin Lyons and many more.

LIMITED EDITION 5″ X 8″ | 54 PAGE | TWO COLOR RISOGRAPH CREATED WITH LOVE IN OAKLAND, CA.

100% of profits donated to Planned Parenthood. 

Alumna Jeanette Hart-mann: Seedbroadcast, print edition

The Mobile Seed Story Broadcasting Station is an old bread truck that has been retrofitted into a solar-powered, grassroots roving, seed story shout-out vehicle committed to examining the inter-connections between people, seeds and agri-culture, through the performance, listening, and sharing of seed stories.

It began in 2012, with a cross-country tour of seed libraries, from New Mexico to Vermont. Hosting public events with these seedy partners, as well as at farmers’ markets, community gardens, and with arts organizations, the Mobile Seed Story Broadcasting Station gathered seed stories via audio interviews and broadcast these along with seed sovereignty materials through the mobile van and the internet.

The Broadcasting Station houses several multi-media systems for playing seed stories in the public: exterior speakers, interior tablets, and video monitors. It also has an interactive bulletin board and copy center, which people can use to collect seed information to take home. The bulletin board also acts as a display area where participants can post drawings, writings, thoughts, and pictures of their own. A library of books is available about seed saving, agri-culture, and seed freedom for everyone to use. Seeds from Fodder Project Collaborative Research Farm are on display for people to look at, touch, and listen to. Occasionally there are seeds to share too.

What are Seed Stories?

Seed Stories are the grassroot voices of courage, desire, memory, and dreams. They speak towards the complex relationships between people, seeds, food, ecology, and agency. They are as diverse as the places that nourish them and the people that breath life into them. Seed stories are stories of knowledge, ideas, and actions, as well as histories and thoughts toward the future. There are many, many seed stories and everyone has one. We all eat.

The Seedproject Agriculture Journal is now available in print.

Alumnus Corey Pickett @ Anya Tish Gallery

For Immediate Release Contact: Anya Tish

Anya Tish Gallery

anyatishgallery.com

[email protected]

713.524.2299

FREEZE! Shannon Cannings • Corey Pickett | October 13 – November 11, 2017

Artists Reception: October 13, 6:00 – 8:30 pm

Artists Q&A and Walk-Through: October 14, 1:00 – 2:00 pm

Anya Tish Gallery is thrilled to present FREEZE!, a two-person exhibition featuring paintings and drawings by Shannon Cannings and soft sculptures by Corey Pickett. Through the lens of their own race and gender, both artists question the role of guns in our society in order to appeal for the re-evaluation of current gun legislation.

By looking past the veneer of consumerism, which has distorted and glorified the meaning of ‘gunplay’, Shannon Cannings’ oil paintings explore how toy guns normalize gun culture and create a tolerance for violent language and behavior from childhood. Using the candy-colored and eye-catching visuals of advertising, Cannings’ work draws attention to the juxtaposition of gun violence and the allegedly harmless children’s toy. Each painting is meticulously executed to spotlight the shiny, colored plastic of the gun and its glossy, light reflecting packaging to create an almost irresistible product. Cannings’ works are the product of a mother’s meditation on the convoluted messages of advertising and a response to the controversy surrounding gun control.

In place of gunmetal and steel, Corey Pickett’s immense gun sculptures are stuffed with foam and upholstered in a mélange of versicolor patterns. Pickett draws inspiration from his research of the middle passage and uses Victorian and Dutch textiles to visually reference the past conditions of African-Americans. The artist states “Initially these objects were in response to gun violence towards African-Americans; however, my work has expanded to gun violence against all humans”. Pickett’s ebullient soft sculptures transpose the issue of gun violence to create a comfortable and secure environment in which to contemplate the role of guns in our society.

Shannon Cannings earned her Master of Fine Arts from Syracuse University, New York, and has since exhibited her work across the United States in museums and institutions including Art Museum of Southeast Texas, Beaumont, TX and Tyler Museum of Art, Tyler, TX. In 2001, she was selected to represent the West Texas region in the Texas Biennale. Her work has been featured in print and online publications including New American Paintings and the Houston Press, and Glasstire.

Corey Pickett received his Bachelor of Fine Arts in 2000 and his Master of Education in 2008 from Eastern New Mexico University. In 2017 he is to receive his Master of Fine Arts from the Vermont College of Fine Art. Pickett has exhibited his work throughout the United States in institutions such as the National African American Museum and Cultural Center and is a recipient of the International Sculptural Center’s 2017 Outstanding Student Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Award.

Anya Tish Gallery . 4411 Montrose Blvd. . Houston Texas 77006 . 713.524.2299 . anyatishgallery.com . [email protected]

Alumna Renee Couture @ Gray Space

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Renee Couture [email protected]

Web: http://grayspaceproject.com/

GRAY SPACE: Oregon Artists Present

A Cube-Shaped Itinerant Art Space

Viewing in the Northbound Cabin Creek Rest Area, 20 miles north of Roseburg (milepost 142), Saturday September 30, 11 am

(September 2017,  Cabin Creek Rest Area/I-5, Oregon) GRAY SPACE is a cube-shaped itinerant art space, welded and wheeled by artists. The artists of the GRAY SPACE group will install their individual work inside the 6’x6’x6’ GRAY SPACE and park it for a day at various locations throughout Oregon. Each artist will create a different art installation. GRAY SPACE intentionally engages an audience without the confines and expectations of a gallery or art center.

Its first travel location along the I-5 corridor is the Northbound Cabin Creek Rest Area, just 20 miles north of Roseburg. GRAY SPACE will be deployed Saturday, September 30, 11 am – 3 pm. This event is free and open to the public.

Renee Couture is the second artist to install work in GRAY SPACE module. This work, titled The Highest Fence, focuses on ideas of boundaries and borders – how they impact our lives and how we move through the world. She explores this phenomena through layers and layers of large-scale, cut paper fences as a fence is a man-made barrier that encloses, surrounds, confines, separates, protects, and shows ownership. The idea for The Highest Fence emerged from a variety of sources including the artist’s own life living in rural southern Oregon’s O&C “checkerboard land ownership”,  proverbs, and recent political commentary on fence/wall building.

ABOUT THE ARTIST:

Renee Couture works in sculpture, photography, and drawing. After receiving her BA and before receiving her MFA in Visual Art, Renee rambled about the United States and South America working a wide range of jobs from camp counselor to wild land fire fighter to gourmet goat cheese maker, international backpacker to bank employee. She has exhibited her work nationally in group exhibitions and as a solo artist. Renee has won two Career Opportunity Grants from the Oregon Arts Commission, and also participated in residency programs at Jentel, Vermont Studio Center, Playa, Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts, and Djerassi. She jumped at the opportunity to be participate in GRAY SPACE project out of a drive expand art practice and connect with new audiences. Renee is currently Adjunct Fine Art Faculty at Umpqua Community College. Visit Artist’s Website: www.rcoutureart.com

ABOUT GRAY SPACE PROJECT:

The GRAY SPACE artists are Kate Ali, Lee ImonenMichael BoonstraKathleen CaprarioSandee McGeeAndrew MyersLeah WilsonRenee Couture and Vicki Amorose. This group of Oregon artists gathers around an ideaphoric concept: the traveling installation space, freely accessible to random audiences. In its first year, GRAY SPACE will be parked at various locations in Oregon. The artist will be present to talk about their work. GRAY SPACE intentionally engages an audience without the confines and expectations of a gallery or art center. While on site, the project activates public space and explores the interplay between site, context, art and viewer. GRAY SPACE artists find momentum together and tap the generative resource of each other’s creative drive.

CONTACT: Email Renee Couture [email protected]

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Featured image: image credit: Kate Ali, Gray Space Specs

Alumnus Mark Read in From Outrage to Action Exhibition @ Gallatin Galleries

In conjunction with The Gallatin Climate Change Initiative: A Conference, which will run from September 14-15,2017, NYU Gallatin’s, The Gallatin Galleries will present the exhibition From Outrage to Action, which includes work from artists, journalists, and scientists, all of whom seek to address and act on the issue of climate change.

Artists Reception Monday, September 18, 2017, 6-8pm.

NYU Gallatin School of Individualize Study

1 Washington PL, New York, NY 10003

Participating Artists:

Agnes Denes  •  Ismail Ferdous  •  Gideon Mendel    Civic Laboratory for Environmental Action Research (CLEAR)  •   Mark Read and Grayson Earle Architecture and Urban Design LAB 2017 sponsored by Global Design NYU •   Mary Mattingly  • The Yes Men •  nadahada

Ceremony of Innocence 

Video Installation
Water, Steel, Oil Drum, Video Projection

The title of this piece is taken from William Butler Yeats’ poem, The Second Coming, excerpted below. The projected image, , is a newly introduced international symbol for extinction. The sunken image, , is a recognized international astronomical symbol for Earth. The artists will be replacing the block of ice each day throughout the weeklong exhibit, at approximately 3:00pm, except for Sunday, September 17th.

Excerpt from The Second Coming

“Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.”

– William Butler Yeats, The Second Coming

Grayson Earles diverse technological practice is unified by a political approach to media making. Employing video games, video projection, algorithmic audiovisual generation, biological organisms, and robotics, his work tends to intervene on physical spaces and entrenched ideas. His creative practice articulates a repositioning of resistance to power that invites participation from reluctant citizens.
Earle (b. 1987) lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. He teaches at Hunter College, split between the Computer Science, Film and Media, Integrated Media Arts, and Studio Art MFA programs. This interdisciplinary posture is emblematic to his work as an artist, and is an approach he proselytizes in his courses on game programming, electronics, and generative art.
Recent displays of his work include SeoulArts in South Korea; Eastern Bloc and Centre Phi in Montreal; the Brooklyn Museum, Macy Gallery, and Babycastles in New York City; and the Media Arts Festival in Tokyo. He has published essays on the socioeconomic implications of the Cold War on abstract expressionism in the United States and Russia, as well as new methods for rhetorical approaches in video games

Mark Read is best known as the artist-activist that produced the “Occupy Wall Street Bat Signal” in November of 2011. Subsequent to that projection-intervention Read initiated The Illuminator project, which has gone on to produce hundreds of projection-interventions around the world. The Illuminator’s work has received wide acclaim from both social activists and the art world. Their work has been featured in academic publications such as Public Art Dialogue, and exhibited in galleries and museums, including the Brooklyn Museum. In 2016 The Illuminator was Artist in Residence at the Hemispheric Institute for Performance and Politics. Read teaches courses on art and politics at New York University, where he is employed as an adjunct professor.

Visiting Faculty Member Việt Lê, Sum of Parts Interview

Excerpt:

Việt Lê is an artist, writer and curator using these creative narratives to tell stories around different forms of trauma: historical, state-imposed, identity-related, and more. Whether in the form of a poem or a curated installation, his work is deeply layered, tinged with loss as well as the beauty of living.

What drives you to wake up in the morning & what keeps you up at night?
I believe we are in a crisis. I don’t believe in the anxious language of refugee “crisis,” although we are globally experiencing mass migrations in the shadow of capital and wars.  In this age of Brexit, xenophobia, gun violence, self-interest and selfies, we are in the depths of a sociopolitical, environmental and spiritual crisis. What wakes me up and keeps me up is the crisis of meaning: how do we facilitate and create meaningful, productive exchanges with our limited world views?  And how do we get ourselves and others to expand the limits of our individual and collective vision?

Trained as an ethnographer, much of my art and research involves collaboration. I worked with many fantastic artists in Hà Nội, including Jamie Maxtone-Graham, my director of photography, as well as conceptual artists Nguyễn Phương Linh, Tuân Mami, Nguyễn Quốc Thành. The dancer is Duy Thanh and you may recognize Phong (the trans M to F protagonist) from the film Finding Phong.
eclipse is about longing and loss—losing a loved one or a country (as I did, as a refugee) and desperately wanting it back, with no recourse.  It is indicative of our current moment, wanting to “make America great again”: we’ve fallen from grace, lost our garden of Eden, there is no way back. On the other hand, it can be about spirituality—wanting to give up everything as a path towards enlightenment, towards ego-lessness—and its blind struggle.

To read full Sum of Parts article, click here.

To read more about Việt, click here and here.

Alumnus David French @ The Oakman

Alumnus David French, ’10, will participate in The Art Project at the Oakman in Jersey City, Friday, September 8th, from 6-8pm.

For more information on David’s work, click here.

Northeast Alumni Exhibition @ Atlantic Works Gallery

Here and There

Saturday October 14 – Friday October 27th

“[Places] give us continuity, something to return to, and offer a familiarity that allows some portion of our own lives to remain connected and coherent.”

Rebecca Solnit, The Faraway Nearby

Vermont College of Fine Arts offers a low-residency MFA in Visual Art program, and so students of the program inevitably end up thinking about place and what it means. The program is here (Montpelier, Vermont) and it is there (wherever students live and work). Threads from across the country and sometimes globe meet in Montpelier and connect students, teachers and alumni. In Here and There, thirteen alumni of the program offer their interpretations of place and what it means to them. In addition to attending VCFA, Renee Lauzon, Muriel Angelil, Heather Park, Chip Rutan, Sumru Tekin, Kim Darling, Valerie Hird, Sabrina Fadial, Brian Zeigler, Samantha Eckert, Wendy Powell, Maggie Nowinski and Leah Grimaldi have lived or currently live and work in New England.

Saturday, October 14th  6:00-9:00 pm Opening Reception,

Thursday, October 19th 6:00-9:00 pm Third Thursday Reception and Artist Talk

Gallery Hours 2:00-6:00 pm Fridays and Saturdays

Atlantic Works Gallery 80 Border Street, East Boston

Featured image: Renée d. Lauzon, “The Pink Underbelly of Home Wants A Scratch,” inkjet print on canvas on paper, 8 x 8, 2017. Courtesy of the artist.

Alumnus Nicolas Gadbois ’09 @ Todd Weiner Gallery

Left Behind, an exhibition at Todd Weiner Gallery

9/1/17-930/17

115 W 18th St Kansas City, MO 64108 United States

An exhibition of surreal oil paintings featuring blank signs and billboards set in eerie landscapes. The work examines the way shifting realities in commerce and industry impact small towns in America. The blank signs are a signifier for empty consumerism.

Former Faculty Member Sowon Kwon @ Full Haus

Sowon Kwon
coffee table comma books
September 2 – December 3

Opening Saturday September 2nd
3-6pm

 

Through sculptural and video installations, digital animation, drawing, printmaking, and artist books, Sowon Kwon has employed translation as both artistic medium and the subject of critique in her art since the early 1990s. Kwon’s formative early work From the Land of Porcelain, 1993, turns James McNeill Whistler’s Peacock Room, 1876-77, into a series of reliefs. This piece offers a literal shallowness of depth to correspond to the symbolic flatness of Whistler’s design, influenced by fantasies of Asia. The installation was included in The New Museum’s 1993 exhibition Trade Routes, which, like the more-studied 1993 Whitney Biennial, addressed cultural identity in the face of globalization. However, identity politics is about much more than cultural exchange—It is about the negotiation of the self.

The exhibition coffee table comma books includes work from across Kwon’s career and is conceived, in the artist’s words, as “a small registry of various associative couplings: then and now, writing and making, homophones and namesakes (샘 and Sam), the domicile and the workplace, the literal and the figurative, the private/personal and the public/historical.”

Kwon’s 1994 relief sculpture Coffee Table and Escritoire (after Godwin), presented here at Full Haus for the first time since its inclusion in The Queens Museum’s 1994 exhibition Live-Work, depicts an anamorphic interior space furnished with a writing desk and side table designed by Edward William Godwin, a nineteenth-century designer whose “Anglo-Japanese” style influenced the Arts and Crafts movement. The relief sculpture destabilizes the style and its underlying projections of the East by translating it into spatial terms that require viewers to move to a set position in order to see the image without distortion. Installed at Full Haus, the sculpture returns furniture to the gallery, acknowledging the space’s domestic interior.

Language plays an important role in Kwon’s practice, and in addition to her historical relief sculpture, coffee table comma books includes two of Kwon’s artist books. Her 2010 dongghab takes its title from the Korean concept of a social relationship between people of the same age. In 1963—the year of Kwon’s birth—Ed Ruscha published Twentysix Gasoline Stations and Sylvia Plath committed suicide by gas in her home. Taking this convergence as a departure point, dongghab explores an alternative form of self portraiture. Kwon’s 2017 book S as in Samsam, co-published by Secretary Press and Triple Canopy, also employs arbitrary similarity: a homophone between a Korean honorific for teacher and the ubiquitous English name Sam.

Kwon’s most recent work, Fiction, 2017, depicts a comma adorned with fake eyelashes. Of all punctuation marks, the comma is the most likely to be forgotten—with the possible exception of its twin, the apostrophe. The comma helps to locate the terms on either side, which could stand for an ideal practice of negotiating the self. As Kwon writes: “To a break in verse or a shift in pitch, like caesuras. In music, where a caesura is noted, metrical time is not counted…. Yes, to all that.”

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Sowon Kwon (b. 1963 Seoul, Korea) has had solo exhibitions at The Kitchen in New York City, Matrix Gallery/University of CA Berkeley Art Museum, and the Whitney Museum of American Art at Philip Morris. Her work has also been featured in numerous group exhibitions including at The New Museum, The ICA Boston, MOCA Los Angeles, The Queens Museum, The Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco, Artist Space, The Drawing Center, Artsonje Center in Seoul, Korea, the Gwangju Biennale, the Yokohama Triennale in Japan, and San Art in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. She is a recipient of fellowships from The New York Foundation for the Arts in Sculpture, The Wexner Center for the Arts in Media Arts, and The Asian Cultural Council. She holds a BA from UC Berkeley, an MFA from Pratt, and attended the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program in 1991. She currently teaches in the Graduate Fine Arts Program at Parsons The New School in New York City.​

2042 Griffith Park Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90039