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Residency Public Events | 2017

The MFA in Visual Art program would like to invite the community to join us for presentations with our Visiting Artists, as well as student exhibitions, January 28 through February 3.

Graduating Student Exhibition – VCFA Gallery

  • Tuesday, January 31 – Friday, February 3. Hours: 9am-6pm. Gallery may be closed for critiques and reviews as determined by the program.
  • Opening: Monday, January 30, 8-9:30pm, VCFA Gallery

The daily exhibitions are free and open to the public most days. Please be considerate of critique groups and closures as needed for academic purposes.

New and Returning Student Exhibitions – Alumni Hall

  • Sunday, January 29 – Friday, February 3. Hours: 9am-6pm.
  • Opening: Saturday, January 28, 7-8:30pm, Alumni Hall

Gallery may be closed for critiques and reviews as determined by the program.

Visiting Artists Presentations:

Art, Place and Place-making
  • Sunday, January 29, 10:30am to noon,  College Hall Chapel
  • Artist-in-Residence, Mildred Beltré, will discuss her practice.

Mildred BeltreMildred Beltré, is a Brooklyn-based artist, mother, and popular educator working in print, drawing, and participatory politically engaged practice to explore facets of social change. She is interested in exploring political movements and their associated social relations and structures. Her most recent work involves looking at revolutionary theorizing and posturing through a feminist lens.

Beltré’s selected national exhibitions include: International Print Center New York, NYC; Burlington City Arts, Burlington, VT; Five Myles Gallery, Brooklyn, NY; BRIC, Brooklyn, NY; Smack Mellon, Brooklyn, NY; Freedman Gallery, Albright College, Reading, PA; University of Colorado, Boulder, CO; Art in General, NYC ; and international group shows at Projecto Ace, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Hollar Gallery, Prague, Czech Republic; Brun Leglise Gallery, Paris, France; among others.

Her work is included in the Special Collections of the Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY, and the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN, among others.

She has been awarded residencies at the Lower East Side Printshop, the Vermont Studio Center, and the Santa Fe Art Institute. She has received grants from the New York Foundation for the Arts, the Brooklyn Arts Council,  Brooklyn Foundation, and the Rema Hort Foundation, among others.

Beltré is the co-founder of the Brooklyn Hi-Art! Machine, an ongoing socially engaged collaborative art project in Crown Heights, Brooklyn that addresses gentrification and community building through art-making.

Waiting/Welcome
  • Sunday, January 29, 7pm, College Hall Chapel
  • A poetic meditation/reading/screening performed by MFA in Visual Art faculty, Viet Le and Faith Wilding with slides of images of colonial subjects from National Geographic, rephotographed and titled by faculty member, Michelle Dizon. A discussion with the audience follows.
Brooklyn Hi-Art! Machine: Community and Collaboration
  • Wednesday, February 1, 1-2:30pm, Chapel, College Hall
  • Artist-in-Residence, Mildred Beltré, and her collaborator, Visiting Artist Oasa DuVerney, will discuss their collaborative work.

Mildred and OasaThe Brooklyn Hi-Art! Machine is a socially-engaged project started in 2010 by artists Mildred Beltré and Oasa DuVerney. Dubbing ourselves the “Official Unofficial Artists in Residence” of our block, we set up tents, tables, and art supplies on the street outside our apartment building and invited anyone walking by to stop and make art with us. In this way we co-founded the Brooklyn Hi-Art! Machine (BHAM), a collaborative public art intervention that explores art-making as a community-building tool.

Often when a neighborhood is undergoing rapid change, outdoor space is criminalized for some while being preserved for others. One thing that the BHAM seeks to do in its insistence to be outdoors, and particularly on the street, is about claiming the street as a generative space for people of color. Public and collective projects are a way of combating the social isolation that leads to suspicion amongst neighbors as opposed to cooperation. By engaging our neighbors on the street, we facilitate conversation and trust which is often lost when a community undergoes significant transition and upheaval. Our vision is to facilitate a public space for community members—often silenced by socio-economic circumstances—to get informed, feel empowered, create, and organize to take positive action.

As artists it is important to us to not create work solely for the gallery, but also to use our practice to make artwork with and for our community. By creating weavings and art activities on our sidewalks we provide a visible and participatory space for Crown Heights residents of all ages to see and interact with each other. These workshops serve as a creative outlet for our neighbors and provide an opportunity to engage with each other outside of the daily routine and thus encourage a new kind of interaction, one leading to new social relations based on mutual respect and understanding. The fence weavings provide an opening for that conversation amongst neighbors to begin.

Oasa DuVerney is a Brooklyn-based artist and mother, born in Queens, New York. Selected exhibitions include “The View From Nowhere,” Rush Arts Gallery, NYC (2016); “The Window and the Breaking of the Window,” Studio Museum in Harlem, NYC (2016); The Brooklyn Biennial, BRIC, Brooklyn NY (2016), “Crossing the Line,” Mixed Greens Gallery, NYC (2013); “March On!,” Brooklyn Academy Of Music (2013); “Through A Glass Darkly,” Postmasters Gallery, NYC (2012).

DuVerney was awarded the Rush Philanthropic Foundation Artist Residency (2016), Smack Mellon Studio Artist Residency (2014-2015) the LMCC Workspace program residency (2012-2013), Brooklyn Foundation Grant (2016) a grant from the Brooklyn Arts Council (2011), a grant award from the Citizens Committee For New York City (2010, 2013), and the Aljra Emerge Fellowship by the Aljira Center for Contemporary Art (2007).

Media and Publications include The Independent, UK (2016), PIX 11 News (2016), Hyperallergic (2015, 2016), The Guardian, UK (2015), Palestine News Network (2013), The New York Times (2012, 2011), and The New York Daily News (2010). She received her B.F.A. from the Fashion Institute of Technology and her M.F.A. from Hunter College, CUNY.

Visiting Artists/Scholars during the Visual Art residency:

Damali Abrams, Ujju Aggarwal, Eshrat Erfanian, Nils Karsten, Suzy Spence, Rodrigo Valenzuela, and John Willis.

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Alumnus Matthew Whitney Featured in “Expanded”

August 2012 alumnus Matthew Whitney’s work has been featured in Expanded, a blog focused on contemporary drawing practices.

Excerpt:

“I am interested in the process of movement, and my current work manifests in the everyday practice of walking. My means of contextualizing these everyday practices involves drawing on paper, considered a 2D medium. It’s a form of reverse-embodiment, in which the real encounter becomes charted by the 2D. I write and draw not just by pen and paper, but also by using GPS technology to record my paths through a landscape. In other words, I am able to write text and draw images into the urban grid by the direct action of walking. This integrates yet another space: that of the digital, and in which dimensional realm do we situate the digital? We call it the “virtual”, which can be both 2D and 3D, and also neither, as we encounter it on a screen or projection or hologram. A screen is flat, but pixels have mass, and what we are seeing is representations of binary information – ones and zeroes, which actually occur as electrical pulses. Is electricity flat? As we move, we blur categorizations of 2D and 3D space, for we never fully exist in one, and we never exist anywhere for long. Rather, we pass through spaces, always feeling our way. Movement is thought of as getting from point A to point B – be it in walking, riding the bus, gardening, making things, or even sitting still. The constant of durational time makes non-movement, or being static, an impossibility. A line is sometimes understood as a point moving through space. The extent of that point though can also be thought of as a line, for as you get closer, the point becomes larger, and in a sense can be reconstituted as a line. Thus perhaps a point also cannot be considered static.”

To read full article click here.

To see more of Matthew’s work, click here.Best Authentic Sneakers | Men's Sneakers

Alumna Judy Walgreen and Faculty Member Michelle Dizon Receive Art Matters Grant

Art Matters announces 2016 grantees

Art Matters is pleased to announce the recipients of its 2016 grants to individual artists. The foundation awarded 26 grants of 5,000 and 10,000 USD for projects and ongoing work that breaks ground aesthetically and socially.

In addition to grants to individuals, Art Matters made a special grant to Lower Manhattan Cultural Council for Michael Richards: Winged, an exhibition of work by Richards, a 1995 grantee, who died tragically in his LMCC studio in the World Trade Center on 9/11.

In announcing the grants, Art Matters Director Sacha Yanow said, “We are thrilled to support this extraordinary group of artists from across the U.S. Their practices are diverse, engaging issues of social justice and experimenting with form. We feel their voices are particularly important at this moment in the world, and through our funding we hope to help amplify them.”

2016 Grantees:

Sandra Haydee Alonso (El Paso, TX)
Wearable sculptural works that question borders, identity, and relationships.

Katrina Andry (New Orleans, LA)
Ongoing printmaking work involving vignettes that challenge racial stereotyping.

Sadie Barnette (Oakland, CA)
Work based on the FBI files and COINTELPRO’s surveillance of the artist’s father and his activities with the Black Panthers.

Black Salt Collective 
(Oakland/Los Angeles, CA)
Ongoing performance and archiving work of this Black, Brown and Indigenous women artist collective.

Frank Chi (Washington DC)
New short film that remixes imagery from the women’s suffrage movement.

Complex Movements (Detroit, MI)
Ongoing multi-media performance and installation work engaging community-led social justice movements in Detroit and beyond.

Michelle Dizon (Los Angeles, CA)
The Archive’s Fold, an artist’s book that explores the politics of archives.

Skylar Fein (New Orleans, LA)
Ongoing work with Parisite, a community-based New Orleans skate park, and the youth who built it.

FORCE: Upsetting Rape Culture (Baltimore, MD)
Nuestra Tierra, Mi Cuerpo, a Monument Quilt display at the US/Mexico border in collaboration with La Casa Mandarina and Latinx survivors of rape and abuse.

Vanessa German (Pittsburgh, PA)
Museum of Resilience, a neighborhood art place centered around the global interconnectedness and power of human beings.

Harriet’s Apothecary (Brooklyn NY)
Ongoing work of this healing justice collective led by Black cis women, queer and trans healers, health professionals, artists and ancestors.

Taro Hattori (Richmond, CA)
Rolling Counterpoint, a mobile teahouse providing a platform for discussions around inequities within local communities.

Xandra Ibarra (Oakland, CA)
New performance about corporeal inhabitation, racialized skin and concealment in the age of surveillance.

Jellyfish Colectivo y Los Dos 
(El Paso, TX)
Collaborative traveling street art initiative along the US/Mexico border.

Amos Paul Kennedy Jr. (Detroit, MI)
Ongoing poster printing for concerts at Historically Black Colleges and Universities in the USA.

Young Joon Kwak (Los Angeles, CA)
New body of work involving trans performance objects.

Troy Michie (Brooklyn, NY)
Travel to El Paso towards the development of multi-disciplinary works inspired by the Zoot suit.

Holly Nordlum (Anchorage, AK)
Tupik Mi, a film and community based project dedicated to the revitalization of traditional tattooing amongst Inuit women.

Ahamefule Oluo (Seattle, WA)
Development of SUSAN, a theatrical performance about the artist’s mother.

Laura Ortman (Brooklyn, NY)
Ongoing work involving the recording and collection of sounds, songs, stories and voices of Native Americans in New York City.

Otabenga Jones and Associates (Houston, TX)
Creation of an education and activity packet for the youth of Houston’s historic Third Ward neighborhood.

Sondra Perry (Perth Amboy, NJ)
Video work involving the NCAA’s use of the artist’s twin brother’s likeness.

Dario Robleto (Houston, TX)
A body of work centered around the history of the heartbeat.

Tina Takemoto (San Francisco, CA)
The third in a trilogy of experimental films about queer Japanese life during American wartime imprisonment.

Rodrigo Valenzuela 
(Los Angeles, CA/Seattle, WA)
Video work about unpaid labor, volunteering, and internship culture.

Judith Walgren (San Francisco, CA)
Photographic and video work towards an alternate curriculum challenging existing K-5th grade California Mission studies.

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Alumna Michelle Hagewood | Henry Art Gallery Seattle

Vermont College of Fine Arts alumna Michelle Hagewood is the assistant curator of school, youth, and family programs at Henry Art Gallery in Seattle, WA. Recently she was interviewed by the Seattle Times.

Here is an excerpt:

Assistant curator gets to combine three of her favorite things: working with youth, exploring art and designing activities around the museum experience.

How did you get started in that field? Not long after receiving a Bachelor of Fine Arts from the Maryland Institute College of Art, I picked up a weekend job helping out with family programs at the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore. There I was introduced to the field of museum education and was hooked. I had found a job that combined three of my favorite things: working with youth, exploring art and designing activities that allowed people to respond and make creations inspired by their museum experience. Since then, I’ve followed this line of work in various ways at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and now the Henry!

What’s a typical day like? My favorite thing about working in museum education is that every day is completely different. Depending on the day I might meet a new artist, catch up on the newest learning theory or create a fantastical landscape alongside 5-year-olds and their families. Lately, I’ve been spending a lot of time with an awesome group of young people, the members of the Henry Teen Art Collective, who meet with me every week to create new projects and programs for the Henry.

To read the entire interview click here.

To learn more about the Henry Art Gallery click here.

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MFA-V Alumna Carissa Burkett Performs @ Disjecta

Liminal’s immersive opera update of Fassbinder’s 1972 black comedy for the stage.

Audiences are invited to wander through a Fassbinder fantasia as Liminal combines performance art, video, and opera into a unique, immersive experience, a hybrid of theatre and gallery installation, of live performance and video.

In this (literally) biting social satire, Phoebe Zeitgeist is an alien agent sent to Earth to investigate human democracy in action. Unfortunately, Phoebe has a problem—she knows our language, but can’t figure out US. Then the vampires show up.

TRIGGER WARNINGS: substance abuse, sexuality, semiotics, societal complacency, firearms, fetishes, structuralism, choking, privileged classes behaving badly, suicide, Hegel.

Purchase tickets here.

Featuring
Carissa Burkett (soprano) as Phoebe Zeitgeist
With Linda Austin, Evan Corcoran, Carla Grant, Wayne Haythorn, Eleanor Johnson, Don Kern, Alex Reagan, Danielle RossTodd Van Voris

Written by Rainer Werner Fassbinder
Translated by Denis Calandra
Direction and Media Design by John Berendzen
Developed by John Berendzen, Evan Corcoran and the ensemble
Original music by John Berendzen and Carissa Burkett
Costume by Faerin Millington and Manot VonRocket
Crew Jared LeeSharon Porter, Nancy Novotny

Featuring Fassbinder zines by Going Place

Disjecta Contemporary Art Center, 8371 N Interstate Ave, Portland, OR 97217url clone | 『アディダス』に分類された記事一覧

MFA-V Alumna Mary Ting Curates Endangered! NYC

ENDANGERED!

Curated by Mary Ting

November 16 to February 3, 2017

 

ENDANGERED! the exhibition and its related programming is an emergency call to save the imperiled creatures whose precarious state is completely human caused. The endangered species crisis is growing at an alarming rate due to wildlife trafficking for animal parts and the exotic pet trade; habitat loss, degradation and conflicts due to the mining, logging, drilling, dams, agriculture, and livestock grazing, and further exacerbated by climate change. Wildlife trafficking with its direct ties to criminal syndicates and weapons threatens the rule of law, social stability and global security. This crisis is not just about the animals and regional problems – this involves all of us.

ENDANGERED! will include photography, prints and sculpture by a group of acclaimed international artists who are dedicated to the cause. From Nick Brandt’s heartbreaking Across the Ravaged Land series, to the expressionistic protest prints of Sue Coe, the exhaustive Photo Ark by Joel Sartore, the last photographs of Cecil, the famed lion, by his researcher and photographer, Brent Stapelkampf, to the Ivory Buddhist deity pieces by Mary Ting, these artists are emphatic about the critical nature of these issues.

The exhibition ENDANGERED! and its public programs are co-sponsored by the John Jay College Sustainability and Environmental Justice program. sustainabilityjjay.org

For more information and additional upcoming public programs: endangeredexhibition.blogspot.com

Gallery Hours: 9- 5 PM, M – F, or by appointment
Location: 6th Floor Haaren Hall, John Jay College, 899 Tenth Avenue, NY, NY, 10019

For more information please contact:

The Anya and Andrew Shiva Gallery John Jay College
860 11th Avenue
New York, NY 10019 [email protected] 212-237-1439 www.shivagallery.org

About John Jay College of Criminal Justice: An international leader in educating for justice, John Jay College of Criminal Justice of The City University of New York offers a rich liberal arts and professional studies curriculum to upwards of 15,000 undergraduate and graduate students from more than 135 nations. In teaching, scholarship and research, the College approaches justice as an applied art and science in service to society and as an ongoing conversation about fundamental human desires for fairness, equality and the rule of law. For more information, visit www.jjay.cuny.edu.

 

Image: ©Nick Brandt, Ranger with Tusks of Killed Elephant, Amboseli, 2011 Courtesy of the artist and Edwynn Houk Gallery, New York and Zurich

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MFA-V Alumna Kathy Couch | Performance|Portrait @ Invisible Dog Art Center

PERFORMANCE| PORTRAIT by A CANARY TORSI – Invisible Dog presents a canary torsi’s new responsive video installation, Performance | Portrait. The work invites each visitor to an encounter with a performer. Grounded in questions of intimacy and connection within the performance experience, four distinguished performers were recorded maintaining their focus on a future audience.

LEAD COLLABORATORS
Yanira Castro (Concept/Choreographer), Kathy Couch (Installation Artist), Stephan Moore (Interaction Designer), Julie Wyman (Filmmaker)

PERFORMER COLLABORATORS
Anna Azrieli, Leslie Cuyjet, Peter Schmitz, David Thomson

This exhibition is part of Intermediaries, a 2016 program co-commissioned and presented by the Invisible Dog and Immediate Medium and funded by the New York State Council on the Arts.

Commissioning support for Performance I Portrait also provided by the Catherine Tell Foundation and Creative Art Council at Brown University, as a part of The Conference for Research on Choreographic Interfaces (CRCI). Performance I Portrait is sponsored, in part, by the Greater New York Arts Development Fund of the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, administered by Brooklyn Arts Council (BAC). It was developed, in part, during a BRIClab Residency at BRIC House in Brooklyn, NY, a residency with producing partner High Concept Labs in Chicago, and with residency support from Gibney Dance Center and ISSUE Project Room in New York and Amherst College in MA. Additional support provided by UC Davis, CA.

Opening Reception: Saturday December 3, from 6 to 10pm
On viewing from Monday to Saturday from 12pm to 7pm, Sunday from 12pm to 5pm

Part of WONDERLAND, annual group exhibition at The Invisible Dog.

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The Art of the Animal Reviewed by Antennae, Annie Potts

The Art of the Animal: Fourteen Women Artist Explore the Sexual Politics of Meat was conceived and edited by three VCFA MFA Visual Art alumni, Kathryn Eddy, LA Watson, and Janelle O’Rourke who also contribute essays and images of their work, with artists Nava Atlas, Sunaura Taylor, Yvette Watt, Angela Singer, Hester Jones, Suzy Gonzalez, Renée Lauzon, Olaitan Calendar-Scott, Patricia Denys, Maria Lux, and Lynn Mowson. The book explores contemporary women artists’ engagement with how women and animals are depicted in contemporary culture. Inspired by Carol Adams’ seminal text, The Sexual Politics of Meat: A Feminist Vegetarian Critical Theory, fourteen women artists’ work continues the conversation Adams began in two decades ago, and the book serves as a catalog for an exhibition at the National Museum of Animals and Society, in Los Angeles which will open in February 2017.

Keri Cronin, Associate Professor of Visual Art Department at Brock University, Canada contributed the foreword; Carolyn Merino Mullen, Director of the National Museum for Animals and Society, Los Angeles contributed an essay; Carol J. Adams contributed the afterword. Published by Lantern Books, NY.

Click here to read Annie Potts’ review in Antennae.Running Sneakers | Women’s Designer Sneakers – Luxury Shopping

Alumni News: Artist Yukiyo Kawano Collaborates with Portland Artists

Yukiyo Kawano graduated from Vermont College of Fine Arts MFA Visual Art low-residency program in August 2012. Recently Kawano and her collaborators, Meshi Chavez and Allison Cobb, discussed their project “A Moment in Time,” with hatchthefuture.org. The performance brings together Kawano’s sculptural objects “Fat Man” and “Little Boy,” replicas of the atomic bombs dropped on her home town of Hiroshima in 1945, Chavez’s Butoh dance practice, and Cobb’s sound poetry. Each of these artists share a geographical link to the age of nuclear bombs and energy (Chavez and Cobb both grew up in New Mexico where nuclear testing occurred), and within this shared legacy, their collaborative practice lays bare a multitude of questions about what it means to live under the invisible threat of nuclear warfare and environmental disaster.

Follow this link to learn more and listen to the interview.

 

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Summer 2016 Grads

Patrick DeGuira

Patrick DeGuira

Ruth Moon

Ruth Moon

Katie Richardson

Katie Richardson

David Kutz

David Kutz

Andrea Beck

Andrea Beck

Judith Brisson

Judith Brisson

Lana Taliaferro

Lana Taliaferro

Karen Louise Spears

Karen Louise Spears

Nikki Juen

Nikki Juen

Veronica Cross

Veronica Cross

 

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