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Winter 2018 MFA in Visual Art graduates!

 

Alumni Diedra Kruger and Dana Wigdor @ Gallery 3711

Planetary Psalms: New paintings by Dana Wigdor and Jasmine Ruulze, curated by Diedra Kruger

December 18, 2017 – March 16, 2018

Gallery 3711
3711 Market Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104

Gallery hours:
Monday – Friday 9-5
or by appointment
[email protected]

Reception:
Thursday, January 25th, 6:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Gallery 3711 is pleased to present “Planetary Psalms” of earthly delights and extraterrestrial musings – an exhibition of new paintings by Jasmine Ruulze and Dana Wigdor, curated by Diedra Krieger.

Ruulze’s paintings explore the interrelationships of the circle of life and creatures of the “wild” while Wigdor’s paintings take us on an interplanetary journey where an unseen “creature”, or presence ushers the viewer through the darkness and color of deep space. They are doing imaginative work, both invoking lyrical images; Ruulze’s of the natural world’s intersection with itself, and Wigdor’s of an encounter with an unseen presence that radiates as bursts of light.

Their sense of play and wonder draws us in. Do Re Mi! They take us on a journey with things we think we know and make them unfamiliar in order to provoke us. Indulgent perhaps, necessary for sure, they invite us to reflect back on our very existence as creatures within the material and ethereal world.

Painting serves both artists as the medium of choice to best express their ideas. They are in love with the medium: Wigdor with the luxe, multi-layered surface of an oil painting, applying layer after layer of thick brushwork and sanding it down, works her canvases to find their inner creatures; Rockwell with the quickness of gouache in combination with pencil drawings and markers, draws and paints, releasing for us again and again the myriad images of her active imagination.

Wigdor’s painting, “More Than You Know”, starts her series with a lift-off from a cobalt and violet light drenched glacial landscape – the starting place of this emotional, intergalactic journey. Each painting depicts either a solitary planet, or galaxy-like cluster which hovers and connects the viewer to the familiar cosmos of our place in the solar system. Like a solar wind, the sequential paintings are a journey through planes of color and paint spatterings of celestial matter.

Dana Wigdor earned her BFA from The San Francisco Art Institute in 1990, and her MFA from the Vermont College of Fine Arts in 2008. She has exhibited both nationally and internationally including San Francisco, New York, Moscow, and Berlin. In 2004 she received a National Endowment for the Arts Creation Grant to produce her solo exhibition “Fugue”. The Fleming Museum and the Brattleboro Museum & Art Center both featured her artist’s talk “The Anthropomorphic Machine” where Wigdor introduced the mystifying creatures that populate her work.

Wigdor states, “Paint is a perfect medium for capturing the invisible forces that surround us – where color and light build a bridge between what is tangible and the elusive place ‘beyond’. This can be understood as outer space, as heaven, as after life, or more abstractly, as simply somewhere out there.”

Wild creatures big and small as well as flora and fauna provide ritual imagery for Jasmine Ruulze’s day dreams and personal mythology. The symbols and stories of birds, snakes and countless other animals, plants and nature from all over the world fascinate her. A deer’s ear with the sun shining down makes the ear transparent, the veins in the ear shine through, creating a pattern which some leaves, plants and insects mimic. She is mesmerized by these details; everything is related on this earth. This reality allows quite the exploration of interpretation in this series of paintings.
Jasmine says she has always had and still has a very active imagination, and just naturally applied that to image making. Growing up in the Adirondack mountains, more or less isolated from anyone her age, Jasmine would explore the land and make up stories in her head. Painting and drawing became the way she told the stories that she had imagined. Today Jasmine still lives in this world created by her own imagination and painting is the interpretation: it is her preferred language.

Jasmine says: “If I could live in the work I would. I have always compared my thoughts to a slide projector that is going very fast and clicking image by image at a rapid pace, I cannot turn my brain off. I am a creature driven by everything I have ever seen, conversations I have had and if other creatures are interested in what I am making then I am flattered and invite them to take the images in and create what they want out of them.”

Jasmine Ruulze creates psychedelic voyages using gouache and markers on paper. She has been creating for over 20 years, finding herself in many locations physically, mentally and emotionally. She gets her inspiration from nature, social context, history, family, friends, culture, literature and music. She has attended many artist residencies and is very actively showing her work, past and present. Ruulze lives and works in the South.

Diedra Krieger is an intermedia artist and curator working at the intersection of art and engineering. Her ongoing project Plastic Fantastic, a geodesic dome built from 6000 water bottles, is an immersive environment for play. Diedra has an MFA from VCFA and an MA from Monash University in developmental studies, and coordinates projects and outreach for Kod*lab, a legged robotics lab and subsidiary of GRASP Lab, Penn Engineering.

 

University City Science Center

3711 Market Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104

Alumnus Linda King-Ferguson @ White Columns

White Columns Online ‘Stomach Acid Reflux’ curated by Ellie Rines

Stomach Acid Reflux, an online inventory that deals with the human body in a way that is somehow both grotesque and formally elegant.

Traditional themes–still life, formal abstraction–and traditional composition–symmetry, etc…– i.e. artistic practice of control is confounded by dysfunction and absurdity. Fake vomit on a scale, ketchup packets’ portrait, tits with nips carved out, tissuebox architecture, spray foam can ejaculation, dairy still life– all direct or subliminal hints to the disgusting bodily fluids resulting from the things we love and hate – sex, bodies, food. Everyday encounters, formalities, objects and commodities become subject to ridicule and admiration, sublimation and disgrace. Juxtapositions ferment and become putrid.

Sophia S Narett painstakingly needlepoints elaborate scenes from fantasy and illusion. In Something Went Wrong, orgies are juxtaposed to a series of women aimlessly wandering in ball gowns, a dead naked women lying on a fish tank. The composition is structured around crumbling architecture, barbed wire and a flank of female figures observing in confusion, disgust and ridicule.

Kurt Treeby knits an architectural model of Prentice Women’s Hospital then turns it into what feels like a beer coozy for a tissue box.

Linda King Fergusons surgical cuts yield formal absences. Though reminiscent of Lygia Clark or Polly Apfelbaum, the painting counteracts the joy of the colors with a sloughing off.

Diana Kingsley ’s dairy still life in a pink background. Entitling the work Well-rounded Wives evokes the low-level despair and boredom beneath the surface of a kitchen. Lactose overload.

Jennifer Sullivan features faux glitter vomit on a painted weight scale. Theatrical, humorous and a bit sinister.  From a “revenge body” series — the tableau lives up to the title.

Amy J Kligman ketchup packet still life. Curiously bulbous. Employing immense detail similar to the way Narrett does but much more laconic.

Robert Rhee in Coral uses a spray foam can to create a bizarre yellow foam shape. Rhee discusses “rubber necking” in his artist statement. This could have been another title for my online selection of works — looking at something gross and candid out of habit and curiosity.

Participating artists include:
Linda King Ferguson
Diana Kingsley
Amy J Kligman
Sophia S Narrett
Robert Rhee
Jennifer Sullivan
Kurt Treeby

Ellie Rines is founder of 56 Henry gallery and a director of Ceysson & Bénétière.

For more information: registry.whitecolumns.org

 

featured image: Linda King Ferguson
Equivalence 60, 2016
Acrylic and stain
28 x 28 inches
Courtesy of the artist

 

Alumna Tania Kupczak @ Ghost Gallery, Seattle

11th Annual Holiday Mini Exhibit at Ghost Gallery in Seattle.

“not afraid of…
After being confronted last autumn with some very scary things, I started drawing images which named things I was NOT afraid of, in order to help calm myself and restore my sense of safety and power. The boxwood wreath is always the first drawn element, providing a safe circle to begin in. In the spirit of a tarot deck, this series now is named only with Roman numerals, since I hope that your individual interpretation will lead to meanings which have resonance with your current moment.”

“I’m a discourse surfer in theater, dance, film, and visual art. I do production design and set decoration for motion pictures, design sets for live performance as well as create title sequences. I draw and paint, and lately have started to learn how to bend neon. I enjoy collaboration. I believe that when they censor our words, visual art will be our path of resistance.”

The Ghost Gallery project was founded in December 2006 by independent curator/event planner Laurie Kearney.  She has curated and hosted art exhibits, auctions, benefits and music events at various venues over the past 11 years including the Pretty Parlor, Solo Bar, Saint John’s Bar & Eatery, Stylus Salon & Spa, Neumos, McLeod Residence, Rocco’s in Belltown, Capitol Hill Block Party, Havana, Edie’s Shoes and more.

Ghost Gallery acquired a unique brick & mortar space in Capitol Hill in April 2010. Come visit us! There is no entrance fee to see exhibits on view.

504 E Denny Way -look for the Pac-Man Arcade Park at Olive/E Denny!
(ENTER THROUGH GATE NEXT TO HILLCREST MARKET)

Hours:
Wed-Fri 11-7pm
Sat-Sun 11-6pm
Tue by Appt

Featured image:

Not Afraid Of: II
ink, acrylic on acid-free vellum
framed to 5″ x 7″

Alumna Thais Mather Solo Show @ Form & Concept

Thais Mather: Reckless Abandon

November 24, 2017-February 18, 2018

Reckless Abandon Events

Opening Reception | Friday, November 24, 2017 from 5-7 pm — RSVP on Facebook
Reckless Abandon: A Reading | Saturday, November 25, 2-3 pm — RSVP on Facebook
Reckless Abandon: Performance | Friday, December 15, 5-7 pm — RSVP on Facebook

“I think people are getting these catastrophic feelings, that this is the end,” says Thais Mather. “I don’t believe in that. I think this is a beginning.” The feminist artist’s new exhibition, Reckless Abandon, comes at a time of cultural, political and environmental upheaval. It’s an ideal moment to examine human history from a revolutionary stance—and present urgent questions that can reveal a new path forward. Through a monumental art installation and a series of performances and events, Mather will challenge viewers to abandon patriarchal structures in favor of a transcendent vision for humanity. Reckless Abandon opens at form & concept in Santa Fe on Friday, November 24, 2017, and runs through February 18, 2018.

“I’m really contemplating humanity: how culture began, where we are now, and where that might evolve,” says Mather. Reckless Abandon comprises hundreds of artworks that will fill form & concept’s ground floor, tracing thousands of years of natural and human history. Mather’s explorations for the show started with a series of large, intricate woodblock prints depicting octopuses, snakes, tarantulas and other creatures. These animals were traditionally vilified by humans because their anatomy is so different from our own, and because their consciousness seems alien. “They are considered ‘total others,’” says Mather. “I’m connecting these themes to the ways in which women have been misunderstood and colonized because we are always foreigners in our own land.”

From this departure point, Mather has created a number of large-scale installations that incorporate ceramics, videos, drawings and other media. Reckless Abandon is a culmination of Mather’s artistic experience thus far. She grew up in Santa Fe, and got her degree in printmaking from the University of Montana in 2006. In 2011, she enrolled as an MFA student at Vermont College of Fine Arts. There, her focus shifted from technical expertise to conceptual rigor as she studied installation, social practice and critical theory. Prominent feminist artists Faith Wilding and Michelle Dizon became her mentors.

After returning to Santa Fe in 2013, Mather furthered her studies of feminist theory and incorporated what she was learning in the bodies of work Wonder Bitch and The Anonymous Author. She exhibited both series in solo exhibitions in Houston, Texas, but initially struggled to find an audience for her work in the famous art market of her hometown. form & concept Gallery Director Frank Rose offered Mather an exhibition in fall 2016, and she’s been hard at work ever since.

“Thais’ multidisciplinary approach was a perfect fit for us,” says Rose. “We look for artists who are open to crossing perceived barriers between art, craft and design in service of powerful storytelling. Thais combs through eons of visual history, and emerges with imagery that disrupts entrenched narratives.”

Reckless Abandon is Mather’s first major show in Santa Fe, though she hesitates to call it a solo exhibition—at least in a traditional sense. “I feel like the concept of the male genius artist presenting his solo magnum opus is a Greenbergian farce. Everything you create is influenced by other artists, by your mentors, by your relationships, by the music and literature you adore.” Mather says. She’s working with a number of feminist artists to present a series of performances in the space, and also considers gallery visitors to be collaborators when they cross the show’s threshold. The exhibition will evolve through these contributions and interactions, inspiring community members to return multiple times and experience new surprises. Inspired by the magical realist movement, Mather aims to weave moments of enchanting transformation into everyday life.

Reckless Abandon is a call to action, not just for us to treat one another and our planet with care, but also for us to abandon what we think we know, in order to create a life of magic in the next phase of our evolution,” says Mather. The artist will answer her own challenge by donating the proceeds of several artworks from the show to nonprofit organizations that focus on social and environmental activism. “We will have to create the impossible if we plan to survive. So why not use our imagination—a force, which as the psychoanalyst Donald Winnicott taught me, is our prime source and mechanism of survival,” Mather says.

RSVP for opening weekend on Facebook.
Browse Thais Mather’s work.

Form & Concept

435 S Guadalupe St, Santa Fe, NM 87501| 505.982.8111

Alumnus Corey Pickett @ Form & Concept Benefit Show, Santa Fe

Guns to Art Benefit Show

November 7-17, 2017
Reception & Live Auction: Friday, November 17, 4-7 pm

RSVP on Facebook.

Decommissioned firearms aren’t the most pliable artistic medium, but that hasn’t stopped faculty and students at Santa Fe Community College from reshaping them into stunning artworks. They’ve been hard at work bending, slicing, shredding and melting old guns into sculptures, jewelry and even apparel. This fall, the art will appear at a special reception, live auction and silent auction in support of art and welding scholarships at SFCC and the 501(c)3 non-partisan organization New Mexicans to Prevent Gun Violence (NMPGV), along with juried works by artists from across the world that reflect on gun violence prevention. The Guns to Art Benefit Show runs November 7-17 at form & concept, with a reception and live auction on Friday, November 17 from 4 to 7 pm.

“When we first started, people would slam doors in our faces,” says Miranda Viscoli, co-founder and co-president of NMPGV. “They’d say, ‘You guys are not going to take our guns.’ This event is a culmination of our efforts to shift the conversation towards responsible gun ownership and gun violence prevention.” In August 2016, NMPGV launched a gun buyback program that invited gun owners to anonymously turn in unwanted firearms to New Mexico law enforcement. The Santa Fe Community College Art Department offered to turn part of the stockpile into art, and a collaboration with the Colorado-based RAWTools project called “Guns to Gardens” transformed the guns into gardening tools. Creations from both programs will appear in the live and silent auctions at the Guns to Art benefit.

NMPGV formed in 2013, the year of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. Not long after the tragedy, a group of concerned citizens came together to face some tough realities about gun violence in New Mexico. They learned that in 2013, the third leading cause of death for New Mexican children was homicide, with 74% of those deaths occurring by firearm. Faced with this troubling statistic and others like it, the group leapt into action, designing programs that could curb firearm injury and death and promote responsible gun ownership through public health, education, advocacy and public awareness efforts.

“Over the years, we’ve developed a multipronged approach to build trust in the community,” says Viscoli. “We know the police, we know local politicians on both sides of the aisle, we know the press, and we know community members.” The programs they’ve launched include Murals to End Gun Violence and the Student Pledge Against Gun Violence, both of which engage  Santa Fe public school students. Since these initiatives started, there has been a 54% drop in local students bringing weapons to school. NMPGV also maintains an interactive map documenting incidents of gun-related violence and death in every New Mexico county. “Guns to Gardens” and the collaboration with Santa Fe Community College are also ongoing projects.

“We love the way NMPGV takes an intersectional approach to their projects and programs,” says Frank Rose, Gallery Director at form & concept. “Guns to Art brings so many of these local stories together, and also invites artists from across the world to express powerful viewpoints on gun violence prevention.” The Guns to Art Benefit Show opens November 7, coinciding with the launch of an online and in-gallery silent auction. Bidding for the silent auction will continue during the Guns to Art reception on November 17, and a live auction moderated by Jake Lovato will also take place at the event.

NMPGV, SFCC and form & concept would like to thank Mayor Javier Gonzales, the City of Santa Fe and Santa Fe Police Chief Patrick Gallagher for their support of this exhibition.

Learn more about the reception & live auction.
Enter the Guns to Art juried show.

Form and Concept

435 S Guadalupe St, Santa Fe, NM 87501| 505.982.8111

 

Alumnus David French “Was/Is” exhibition @ JacksoNewark Gallery

Kristin J. DeAngelis has partnered with JacksoNewark Gallery to curate and present the works artist David French

David French‘s works are fluid gestures, yet frozen in time. But they appear as if it is still occurring. The opening and the show are at JacksoNewark Gallery at 650 Newark Street located inside Urban Consign & Design in Hoboken.

For more information on JacksoNewark Gallery, please feel free to follow on Facebook JacksoNewark Gallery or contact Paul D. Fitzgerald of Urban Consign & Design.

650 Newark Street
Hoboken, New Jersey 07307

Alumna and Curator Patricia Miranda: Fall Exhibitions, NYC

Patricia Miranda Fall Exhibitions and Events.
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Indigo: The Seventh Color
at LABspace 
Artists: Christine AaronBeth DaryGrace DeGennaroLorrie Fredette, Valerie Hammond, Mary HarkJeanne HeifetzLotta HellebergBrece HoneycuttPatricia MirandaPaula Overbay
Artist Reception – October 14, 5 – 7:30pm
On view October 14-November 4, 2017 

Last year a group of artists gathered at my studio for a weekend of Indigo dyeing. Lorrie Fredette and Brece Honeycutt were inspired to curate an exhibition – I am honored to show with these artists!

LABspace is located at 2462 NY Rt 23, Hillsdale, NY, 12529
Gallery Hours:  Saturday 11-5pm & Sunday 11-4pm

I had the wonderful honor to write the catalog essay for artist Lori Glavin‘s exhibition of paintings and collages at The George Gallery in Charleston SC.
“The juxtaposition of hard-edged collages and gestural paintings highlights Glavin’s central painterly concerns, lending the two genres a familial conviviality that might otherwise not be evident. Together they reveal an ongoing artistic dialogue in their penchant for awkward biomorphic shapes, unexpected overlap, crooked line, and masterful tertiary color….”
Read the full essay here.
www.loriglavin.com
Amazing powerhouse artist, publisher, artist advocate, and dear friend Sharon Louden will be a Visiting Lecturer at Lyme Academy on Thursday, October 19, talking about her new book in the series, Living and Sustaining a Creative Life: Cultural Producers. 

Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts, University of New Haven 
Thursday, October 19
Reception 5pm, Lecture 6pm

I will join Sharon after her lecture for a Q&A- it’s sure to be a lively one!

Tickets are $15, free for students. Purchase tickets here
Lyme Academy College is located at 84 Lyme Street, Old Lye CT. Directions here.
image: Sharon Louden; MERGE AT UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT, Oak Hall, at the University of Connecticut in Storrs, CT, 2013. Detail.

On November 7 I will introduce a double feature about the artists Yvonne Jacquette and Rudy Burckhardt, and lead a Q&A afterwards. The Kate Museum is  lovely theater with a full roster of programming and the film series always includes a lively discussion after, so please join me on November 7 and check out the other films.

Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts
Bridging the Arts Film Series
Tuesday, November 7, 5:30 p.m.
at the Katherine Hepburn Museum in Old Saybrook, CT.

The Kate Museum, 300 Main Street, Old Saybrook, CT 06475. Tickets $15 per film.
Bridging the Arts is a curated film series co-sponsored by Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts and the Kate. The series features a selection of art films produced by the highly-regarded Checkerboard Film Foundation and includes a brief lecture before each film.

In September I had a great time participating in 
CENTERPIECE: A Sculpture Garden & Music Pop-Up
a BombPop!Up Production
at Pete’s Candy Store in Brooklyn, NY.

Curated by the ever amazing duo Gaby Collins-Fernandez and Drea Cofield
with Leah Dixon, Sacha Ingber, Aaron Fowler, Leah Guadagnoli, Marie Lorenz, Tammy Nguyen, Patricia Miranda, Cal Siegel, Tom Simon, John Szlasa, Alina Tenser, Karen Tepaz, & Emmy Thelander. See photos here.

Bomb Pop! Up is a Brooklyn-based artist-run initiative producing pop-up Art & Music shows,  Brooklyn NY.

on-site installation: cochineal dyed doilies, twine, tree.

Alumna Nikki Juen in Pussy Party Collective Zine

This is Our Pussy Zine includes original artwork by Nikki Juen, Alex Bowman Ed Fella, Guts & Glory, ITWST, Lisa Junius, Kevin Lyons and many more.

LIMITED EDITION 5″ X 8″ | 54 PAGE | TWO COLOR RISOGRAPH CREATED WITH LOVE IN OAKLAND, CA.

100% of profits donated to Planned Parenthood. 

Alumna Jeanette Hart-mann: Seedbroadcast, print edition

The Mobile Seed Story Broadcasting Station is an old bread truck that has been retrofitted into a solar-powered, grassroots roving, seed story shout-out vehicle committed to examining the inter-connections between people, seeds and agri-culture, through the performance, listening, and sharing of seed stories.

It began in 2012, with a cross-country tour of seed libraries, from New Mexico to Vermont. Hosting public events with these seedy partners, as well as at farmers’ markets, community gardens, and with arts organizations, the Mobile Seed Story Broadcasting Station gathered seed stories via audio interviews and broadcast these along with seed sovereignty materials through the mobile van and the internet.

The Broadcasting Station houses several multi-media systems for playing seed stories in the public: exterior speakers, interior tablets, and video monitors. It also has an interactive bulletin board and copy center, which people can use to collect seed information to take home. The bulletin board also acts as a display area where participants can post drawings, writings, thoughts, and pictures of their own. A library of books is available about seed saving, agri-culture, and seed freedom for everyone to use. Seeds from Fodder Project Collaborative Research Farm are on display for people to look at, touch, and listen to. Occasionally there are seeds to share too.

What are Seed Stories?

Seed Stories are the grassroot voices of courage, desire, memory, and dreams. They speak towards the complex relationships between people, seeds, food, ecology, and agency. They are as diverse as the places that nourish them and the people that breath life into them. Seed stories are stories of knowledge, ideas, and actions, as well as histories and thoughts toward the future. There are many, many seed stories and everyone has one. We all eat.

The Seedproject Agriculture Journal is now available in print.