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Alumnus Corey Pickett @ Anya Tish Gallery

For Immediate Release Contact: Anya Tish

Anya Tish Gallery

anyatishgallery.com

[email protected]

713.524.2299

FREEZE! Shannon Cannings • Corey Pickett | October 13 – November 11, 2017

Artists Reception: October 13, 6:00 – 8:30 pm

Artists Q&A and Walk-Through: October 14, 1:00 – 2:00 pm

Anya Tish Gallery is thrilled to present FREEZE!, a two-person exhibition featuring paintings and drawings by Shannon Cannings and soft sculptures by Corey Pickett. Through the lens of their own race and gender, both artists question the role of guns in our society in order to appeal for the re-evaluation of current gun legislation.

By looking past the veneer of consumerism, which has distorted and glorified the meaning of ‘gunplay’, Shannon Cannings’ oil paintings explore how toy guns normalize gun culture and create a tolerance for violent language and behavior from childhood. Using the candy-colored and eye-catching visuals of advertising, Cannings’ work draws attention to the juxtaposition of gun violence and the allegedly harmless children’s toy. Each painting is meticulously executed to spotlight the shiny, colored plastic of the gun and its glossy, light reflecting packaging to create an almost irresistible product. Cannings’ works are the product of a mother’s meditation on the convoluted messages of advertising and a response to the controversy surrounding gun control.

In place of gunmetal and steel, Corey Pickett’s immense gun sculptures are stuffed with foam and upholstered in a mélange of versicolor patterns. Pickett draws inspiration from his research of the middle passage and uses Victorian and Dutch textiles to visually reference the past conditions of African-Americans. The artist states “Initially these objects were in response to gun violence towards African-Americans; however, my work has expanded to gun violence against all humans”. Pickett’s ebullient soft sculptures transpose the issue of gun violence to create a comfortable and secure environment in which to contemplate the role of guns in our society.

Shannon Cannings earned her Master of Fine Arts from Syracuse University, New York, and has since exhibited her work across the United States in museums and institutions including Art Museum of Southeast Texas, Beaumont, TX and Tyler Museum of Art, Tyler, TX. In 2001, she was selected to represent the West Texas region in the Texas Biennale. Her work has been featured in print and online publications including New American Paintings and the Houston Press, and Glasstire.

Corey Pickett received his Bachelor of Fine Arts in 2000 and his Master of Education in 2008 from Eastern New Mexico University. In 2017 he is to receive his Master of Fine Arts from the Vermont College of Fine Art. Pickett has exhibited his work throughout the United States in institutions such as the National African American Museum and Cultural Center and is a recipient of the International Sculptural Center’s 2017 Outstanding Student Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Award.

Anya Tish Gallery . 4411 Montrose Blvd. . Houston Texas 77006 . 713.524.2299 . anyatishgallery.com . [email protected]best Running shoes | Vans Shoes That Change Color in the Sun: UV Era Ink Stacked & More – Fitforhealth News

Alumna Renee Couture @ Gray Space

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Renee Couture [email protected]

Web: http://grayspaceproject.com/

GRAY SPACE: Oregon Artists Present

A Cube-Shaped Itinerant Art Space

Viewing in the Northbound Cabin Creek Rest Area, 20 miles north of Roseburg (milepost 142), Saturday September 30, 11 am

(September 2017,  Cabin Creek Rest Area/I-5, Oregon) GRAY SPACE is a cube-shaped itinerant art space, welded and wheeled by artists. The artists of the GRAY SPACE group will install their individual work inside the 6’x6’x6’ GRAY SPACE and park it for a day at various locations throughout Oregon. Each artist will create a different art installation. GRAY SPACE intentionally engages an audience without the confines and expectations of a gallery or art center.

Its first travel location along the I-5 corridor is the Northbound Cabin Creek Rest Area, just 20 miles north of Roseburg. GRAY SPACE will be deployed Saturday, September 30, 11 am – 3 pm. This event is free and open to the public.

Renee Couture is the second artist to install work in GRAY SPACE module. This work, titled The Highest Fence, focuses on ideas of boundaries and borders – how they impact our lives and how we move through the world. She explores this phenomena through layers and layers of large-scale, cut paper fences as a fence is a man-made barrier that encloses, surrounds, confines, separates, protects, and shows ownership. The idea for The Highest Fence emerged from a variety of sources including the artist’s own life living in rural southern Oregon’s O&C “checkerboard land ownership”,  proverbs, and recent political commentary on fence/wall building.

ABOUT THE ARTIST:

Renee Couture works in sculpture, photography, and drawing. After receiving her BA and before receiving her MFA in Visual Art, Renee rambled about the United States and South America working a wide range of jobs from camp counselor to wild land fire fighter to gourmet goat cheese maker, international backpacker to bank employee. She has exhibited her work nationally in group exhibitions and as a solo artist. Renee has won two Career Opportunity Grants from the Oregon Arts Commission, and also participated in residency programs at Jentel, Vermont Studio Center, Playa, Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts, and Djerassi. She jumped at the opportunity to be participate in GRAY SPACE project out of a drive expand art practice and connect with new audiences. Renee is currently Adjunct Fine Art Faculty at Umpqua Community College. Visit Artist’s Website: www.rcoutureart.com

ABOUT GRAY SPACE PROJECT:

The GRAY SPACE artists are Kate Ali, Lee ImonenMichael BoonstraKathleen CaprarioSandee McGeeAndrew MyersLeah WilsonRenee Couture and Vicki Amorose. This group of Oregon artists gathers around an ideaphoric concept: the traveling installation space, freely accessible to random audiences. In its first year, GRAY SPACE will be parked at various locations in Oregon. The artist will be present to talk about their work. GRAY SPACE intentionally engages an audience without the confines and expectations of a gallery or art center. While on site, the project activates public space and explores the interplay between site, context, art and viewer. GRAY SPACE artists find momentum together and tap the generative resource of each other’s creative drive.

CONTACT: Email Renee Couture [email protected]

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Featured image: image credit: Kate Ali, Gray Space SpecsRunning sneakers | Nike

Alumnus Mark Read in From Outrage to Action Exhibition @ Gallatin Galleries

In conjunction with The Gallatin Climate Change Initiative: A Conference, which will run from September 14-15,2017, NYU Gallatin’s, The Gallatin Galleries will present the exhibition From Outrage to Action, which includes work from artists, journalists, and scientists, all of whom seek to address and act on the issue of climate change.

Artists Reception Monday, September 18, 2017, 6-8pm.

NYU Gallatin School of Individualize Study

1 Washington PL, New York, NY 10003

Participating Artists:

Agnes Denes  •  Ismail Ferdous  •  Gideon Mendel    Civic Laboratory for Environmental Action Research (CLEAR)  •   Mark Read and Grayson Earle Architecture and Urban Design LAB 2017 sponsored by Global Design NYU •   Mary Mattingly  • The Yes Men •  nadahada

Ceremony of Innocence 

Video Installation
Water, Steel, Oil Drum, Video Projection

The title of this piece is taken from William Butler Yeats’ poem, The Second Coming, excerpted below. The projected image, , is a newly introduced international symbol for extinction. The sunken image, , is a recognized international astronomical symbol for Earth. The artists will be replacing the block of ice each day throughout the weeklong exhibit, at approximately 3:00pm, except for Sunday, September 17th.

Excerpt from The Second Coming

“Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.”

– William Butler Yeats, The Second Coming

Grayson Earles diverse technological practice is unified by a political approach to media making. Employing video games, video projection, algorithmic audiovisual generation, biological organisms, and robotics, his work tends to intervene on physical spaces and entrenched ideas. His creative practice articulates a repositioning of resistance to power that invites participation from reluctant citizens.
Earle (b. 1987) lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. He teaches at Hunter College, split between the Computer Science, Film and Media, Integrated Media Arts, and Studio Art MFA programs. This interdisciplinary posture is emblematic to his work as an artist, and is an approach he proselytizes in his courses on game programming, electronics, and generative art.
Recent displays of his work include SeoulArts in South Korea; Eastern Bloc and Centre Phi in Montreal; the Brooklyn Museum, Macy Gallery, and Babycastles in New York City; and the Media Arts Festival in Tokyo. He has published essays on the socioeconomic implications of the Cold War on abstract expressionism in the United States and Russia, as well as new methods for rhetorical approaches in video games

Mark Read is best known as the artist-activist that produced the “Occupy Wall Street Bat Signal” in November of 2011. Subsequent to that projection-intervention Read initiated The Illuminator project, which has gone on to produce hundreds of projection-interventions around the world. The Illuminator’s work has received wide acclaim from both social activists and the art world. Their work has been featured in academic publications such as Public Art Dialogue, and exhibited in galleries and museums, including the Brooklyn Museum. In 2016 The Illuminator was Artist in Residence at the Hemispheric Institute for Performance and Politics. Read teaches courses on art and politics at New York University, where he is employed as an adjunct professor.

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Alumnus David French @ The Oakman

Alumnus David French, ’10, will participate in The Art Project at the Oakman in Jersey City, Friday, September 8th, from 6-8pm.

For more information on David’s work, click here.Nike Sneakers | Nike

Northeast Alumni Exhibition @ Atlantic Works Gallery

Here and There

Saturday October 14 – Friday October 27th

“[Places] give us continuity, something to return to, and offer a familiarity that allows some portion of our own lives to remain connected and coherent.”

Rebecca Solnit, The Faraway Nearby

Vermont College of Fine Arts offers a low-residency MFA in Visual Art program, and so students of the program inevitably end up thinking about place and what it means. The program is here (Montpelier, Vermont) and it is there (wherever students live and work). Threads from across the country and sometimes globe meet in Montpelier and connect students, teachers and alumni. In Here and There, thirteen alumni of the program offer their interpretations of place and what it means to them. In addition to attending VCFA, Renee Lauzon, Muriel Angelil, Heather Park, Chip Rutan, Sumru Tekin, Kim Darling, Valerie Hird, Sabrina Fadial, Brian Zeigler, Samantha Eckert, Wendy Powell, Maggie Nowinski and Leah Grimaldi have lived or currently live and work in New England.

Saturday, October 14th  6:00-9:00 pm Opening Reception,

Thursday, October 19th 6:00-9:00 pm Third Thursday Reception and Artist Talk

Gallery Hours 2:00-6:00 pm Fridays and Saturdays

Atlantic Works Gallery 80 Border Street, East Boston

Featured image: Renée d. Lauzon, “The Pink Underbelly of Home Wants A Scratch,” inkjet print on canvas on paper, 8 x 8, 2017. Courtesy of the artist.best Running shoes | Mens Flynit Trainers

Alumnus Nicolas Gadbois ’09 @ Todd Weiner Gallery

Left Behind, an exhibition at Todd Weiner Gallery

9/1/17-930/17

115 W 18th St Kansas City, MO 64108 United States

An exhibition of surreal oil paintings featuring blank signs and billboards set in eerie landscapes. The work examines the way shifting realities in commerce and industry impact small towns in America. The blank signs are a signifier for empty consumerism.latest Running | Jordan Ανδρικά • Summer SALE έως -50%

Alumni Yukiyo Kawano Interviewed

A visual artist and a choreographer come together for an Aug. 9 performance work that bears witness to the annihilation of two entire cities and the complex Japanese and American narratives therein.

A scene from a prior performance of "Suspended Moment".

A scene from a prior performance of “Suspended Moment”.

Courtesy of Yukiyo Kawano

Seventy-two years ago, American pilots dropped atomic bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. To this day, historians debate whether, as the U.S. maintained, the bombings were necessary to end World War II in the Pacific Theater, or whether, as some critics hold, they constituted war crimes.

Visual artist Yukiyo Kawano and choreographer Meshi Chavez are the creators of “Suspended Moment,” a multidisciplinary performance work they developed with composer Lisa DeGrace and poet Allison Cobb.

Kawano is from Hiroshima; Chavez grew up in Albuquerque — close enough to the Manhattan Project to have a feel for the American side of this history. They’ve performed this work in places with strong ties to atomic history, like Los Alamos, New Mexico, the Hanford Site, and are now bringing it to Portland for a fifth incarnation.

Chavez’s practice is based in the Japanese performance style butoh. You may have seen it performed by dancers in white makeup, moving with infinitesimal slowness. But Chavez’s style is something more kinetic and stately. In some sequences, he puts himself through organic contortions, twisting and spinning almost out of control. Others are direct references to everyday activities on either side of the Pacific.

Here are some highlights of the conversation.

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Visual Art Alumna Nikki Juen Colab Featured in Brooklyn Rail

Article by Kathy Brew

(excerpt)

Art Rising took place at the Trump Tower Public Garden on June 14th, which happens to be Donald Trump’s birthday and Flag Day. It was the latest in a series of actions that have been using this not-so-known public space as a “living lab” to mobilize people around the risks of the Trump presidency—particularly his plan to slash federal funding for the arts.

The event was organized by Take Trump Tower, and curated by Caterina Bartha. As stated in the program notes: “The artists invite you to enjoy the performances and provoke Trump on his birthday inside his home.”

The crowd was mainly a mix of artists and activists, combined with tourists who were coming to the building because it is the home of the POTUS, including some Trump supporters who happened upon the event, along with some Trump Tower security folks hovering on the sidelines, observing with scrutiny (not to mention the presence of police and secret service members as you enter the building).

Things kicked off at noon with Brick x Brick, a group of women dressed in black and white outfits that included text of many of Trump’s misogynist quotes, standing firm as a wall/backdrop for the hour-long event. Lucy Sexton from Dancenoise, who performs as The Factress, was the emcee/host and welcomed Jimmy Van Bramer, the City Council majority leader and chairman of the council’s cultural affairs committee, who spoke of the importance of government funding and saving the NEA. Then the performances began.

To read full article, click here.

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Alumnus Nils Karsten @ Miyako Yoshinaga NYC

From July 13 to August 11MIYAKO YOSHINAGA is pleased to present its summer exhibition of  works by Nils Karsten. The exhibition Here Are The Keys II is organized in collaboration with mhPROJECTnyc. An opening reception will be held on Thursday, July 13 from 6 pm to 8 pm. The exhibition features both daring and delicate works on paper including woodblock prints, collages, and graphite drawings. Summer g allery hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 11am to 6pm.
For years Nils Karsten has been gathering various images from printed materials as well as personal and found photographs. He particularly enjoys culling from ephemera such as flyers, posters, newspapers and zines. Karsten carefully stores and studies his source materials, and processes these images until he considers them his own. He freely associates disparate images to create his narratives and finds something new within the old and overlooked.  The 70s and 80s political and cultural movements, particularly punk and rock ‘n’ roll music scenes, played a significant role in Karsten’s adolescence in Germany. His figurative art, not only enriched by the remnants of these by-gone eras in the artist’s personal life, but also carefully controlled by the artist’s own structure and organization of the images.

The exhibition highlights three outsize 6 x 6 ft. woodblock prints, the two of which are both iconic and hyper-sexualized images and originally appeared in the 70s. The image of Sticky Fingers is originally the artwork conceived by Andy Warhol for The Rolling Stones album released in 1971. The image of Amorica was taken from a 1976 cover of Hustler magazine, which also the cover image of the 1994 Black Crowes album. The other, entitled Colors (image above) deviates from the recognizable imagery he is known for, while still displaying his love for experimentation and play. Making these prints involves intense manual labors. Karsten rubs paper against table-size plywood into which he carves with dental drills and applies ink. The resulting painterly texture and strong color bring back the provoking energy of original music scenes and the history of the era, still resonating with our contemporary culture.
Other works on paper include Village Voice Grid, a collection of New York-based weekly newspaper’s front-page illustrations, on top of which Karsten playfully superimposes idiosyncratic images and witty words. The work shares graffiti art’s sarcastic social activism. More meditative and surrealistic side of his figurative art is revealed through a series of graphite drawings and “cutout” collages. Delicately and meticulously rendered, they tap into limitless subconscious, the relationship between good and evil and the contradiction that arises in a grotesque world where anything is possible.
Born in 1970 in Hamburg, Germany, Nils Karsten moved to New York in 1995.  He received his BFA from the School of Visual arts in 1999, and in 2002 participated in the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture’s residency program. In 2003 Karsten received his MFA from Vermont College of Fine Arts. Since acquiring his MFA, he has been a faculty member at the School of Visual Arts. His work has been shown in galleries and museums throughout the United States, as well as in Hong Kong, China Kyoto, Japan, Istanbul, Turkey, Berlin, Germany. His work can be found in numerous private and public collections such as the Brooklyn Museum in New York, and the Weatherspoon Art Museum in Greensboro, North Carolina. Karsten currently resides in Brooklyn, New York.
Featured image: Colors, 2015, 66 x 66 in. /168 x 168 cm, woodblock print & oil on paper

 

For more information and/or request, please contact [email protected], +1 212 268 7132
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Alumnus Jeff Marley Spider Installation @ Oconaluftee Island Park

In Cherokee, NC alumnus Jeff Marley and collaborator, Frank Brannon, presented an impermanent installation in Oconaluftee Island Park.

“Based on a spider web, the multi-media installation is part Cherokee cosmology, part commentary on the occidental/oreiental interpretation of historical events.

The web is made from mulberry, and in the folds, there are some hidden phrases,” Marley explained.  “It relates back to the story of when the first printing press was delivered to the Cherokee Nation.  These guys delivering the press were not Cherokee, and so they could not communicate with people as they moved into the Nation to deliver this.  They were really hungry and how do you get food if you cannot communicate? They finally ran into someone who could translate for them,” Marley noted.

To read the full article, click here.

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