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Alumna Yukiyo Kawano | Suspended Moment | Los Alamos Performance

On the anniversary of the world’s first atomic test Suspended Moment, a sculpture installation and Butoh dance and poetry performance by Los Alamos native Allison Cobb, Hiroshima native Yukiyo Kawano, with Butoh choreography/dance by Meshi Chavez, soundscape by Lisa DeGrace, and video projections by Stephen A. Miller, will be performed in Los Alamos, NM.

At the center of the performance is a life-sized sculpture of the bomb dropped on Nagasaki in 1945, created by the artist Yukiyo Kawano. Yuki was born and raised in Hiroshima, a third-generation atomic bomb survivor. She creates her sculptures from WWII-era kimonos that belonged to her grandmother, and sews them together with her hair, melding the DNA of generations of atomic bomb survivors.

co-sponsored by
Los Alamos History Museum, Los Alamos/Japan Project, and Los Alamos County Library System. Funded in part by a grant from the New Mexico Intervention Fund of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Additional Funding: Kawano has received a Career Opportunity Grant award from the Oregon Arts Commission.

The performance takes place from 4-5:30 p.m. at Historic Fuller Lodge, 2132 Central Ave., Los Alamos, NM 87544.Nike air jordan Sneakers | 【海外近日発売予定】 サウスパーク × アディダス オリジナルス キャンパス 80S “タオリー” (GZ9177) – スニーカーウォーズ

Alumnus Ben C. Vitualla Solo Show @ Gallery Luperca Nashville

365 Days

Ben C. Vitualla

Curated By May Hwen

July 1-31

WeHo Crawl Reception

July 1 | 6-9 PM

East Side Project Space

July 1-31

Gallery Luperca is proud to partner with Sticky Rice Collective and curator May Hwen to present 365 Days: New Works by Ben C. Vitualla. Vitualla is the founder and curator of downtown Nashville’s Arcade-based Blend Studio.

Vitualla’s work in a range of mediums is a processing of and commentary on the socio-political environment.  He says, “The current state of our world and my experiences are topics on which I represent in my practice. Themes of politics, profiling minorities, and poverty are focuses I am interested in conveying in my work. My hope is that it will encourage dialogue and maybe understanding issue the world is facing.”

The show opens during the Wedgewood Houston Art Crawl from 6-9 PM on July 1 and runs through the end of the month. The opening reception, hosted by Sticky Rice Collective, will include food trucks created by Sticky Rice alums parked outside.

For further information, artist biography, and images, please contact the gallery.

Gallery Luperca | East Side Project Space | 507 Hagan St. | Nashville, TN 37203

615-669-1384| [email protected] | www.galleryluperca.com

Gallery hours: W-R 2-8  Sun 4-7  | Every First Saturday 6-9 PM

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Alumna Damali Abrams and Naomi Elena Ramirez and Faculty Co-Chair Dalida MarÍa Benfield in NYC

MIGRATORY TIMES/EMBODIED SPACES: TWO PROVOCATIONS + A WORKSHOP.

Migratory Times/Embodied Spaces will center performance works by Naomi Elena Ramirez (NYC) and the collective Diásporas Críticas (Barcelona/Guayaquíl) as transformative pedagogical interventions that open the space of a collaborative workshop to produce collective articulations of (dis)occupying spaces, disidentifications, (re)embodiment, radiofonization, and sonic translocalization, in migratory times.

This event contributes to Migratory Times, a year long global art, research, and pedagogical initiative that facilitates translocal and transnational decolonial feminist dialogues on displacements and migration through cultural interventions, workshops, and publications. Migratory Times is a project of the Institute of (im)Possible Subjects, a transnational feminist art, media and research collective, and is made possible in part with a Community Arts Fellowship from the Abundance Foundation.

ponga cuerpo donde boca

choreographed and performed by Naomi Elena Ramirez

sound design by Naomi Elena Ramirez sounds: excerpt from “Two Woman” by Anonymous; excerpt of speech by Fred Hampton of the Black Panther Party; excerpt of speech by Angela Davis ‘How Does Change Happen?’; Manu Chao, EZLN…Para Todos Todo

As the fog of imagined democracy dissipates how does one prepare oneself for the necessary sacrifices of activism, dissent, and the push for concrete change? When our bodies are on the line, what can we do to encourage ourselves to fight? I ask this of myself because I think the fight is only going to get uglier. ponga cuerpo donde boca responds to these questions through movement explorations of gestures from protest, moving through fear, finding strength in resilience, and dancing to sustain agency of resistance.

Llamando el mago

Diasporas Críticas

Llamando el mago is a live new media work that explores a “crisis of presentation” in an image saturated public sphere conditioned by techniques of surveillance that order the routes and experiences of transmission between metropolis and colony. Departing from the essay of the same title (“Calling the Magician”) by Aime Cesaire, Llamando el mago traverses censorship and media exoticisation, bureaucracy and coloniality, surveillance and polarisation, towards a meditation on decolonisation as a sophisticated anti-racist program that includes political, aesthetic and epistemic freedom of movement.

Naomi Elena Ramirez is a multidisciplinary artist whose work encompasses visual art, video art, performance art, and contemporary dance. Naomi uses photography and drawing as choreographic method, creating experimental scores from which live performance is made. Naomi has an MFA in Visual Art from Vermont College of Fine Arts and a BA in Dance from the University of California at Berkeley. Her work has been presented by Movement Research at The Judson Church; DoublePlus at Gibney Dance; The Bronx Latin American Art Biennial; Nurture Art Gallery; Wallplay Gallery; The Situation Room, LA; Gallery 107, North Adams, MA; Arte Nuevo InteractivA, Mérida, Mexico; Northwestern University’s Performance Studies Conference In Bodies We Trust; New Voices in Live Performance at The Center for Performance Research; amongst others. She is a recipient of the A.I.R. Gallery Fellowship for 2016/2017. She lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. (b. Hermosillo, Mexico) www.naomielenaramirez.com

Diásporas críticas is an open platform for artistic research. Diásporas críticas research explores and responds to the ways in which nationalisms intervene through micro-process to affect the body and the senses, researching notions of “transmission” and “contagion” in relation to mass media and technology as well as medical discourses and disease. They have received various research and production grants from academic and arts institutions. Throughout 2017 Diasporas criticas are preparing a research project entitled “Contralecturas Tropicales”. They are thinking: climate, cliche, sickness, poetic trope, surrealist dream, melodrama, medical theory, compass, geopolitical sex fantasy, cyclical time and exile.http://cargocollective.com/diasporascriticas

Damali Abrams the Glitter Priestess is a project-based artist born and raised in NYC by Guyanese parents. She constructs spaces and experiences of fantasy and myth, using collage, video installation and performance, that explore Black Utopia through the lenses of Afrofuturism and Afro-Caribbean syncretic religions. She examines folklore and contemporary popular culture, placing them in dialogue with one another to create a site of liberation for the Black imagination, rejecting tragedy as the sole, dominant narrative of the Black experience. Damali earned a BA at NYU, an MFA at Vermont College of Fine Arts, and recently completed the Whitney Museum of American Art Independent Study Program. She has been a fellow at A.I.R. Gallery as well as with apexart in Seoul, South Korea. She has been an artist-in-residence at Fresh Milk (Barbados), Groundation Grenada, Jamaica Center for Arts and Learning, The Center for Book Arts, and LMCC on Governors Island.

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Dalida María Benfield, Ph.D., is a Latinx (Panamá/U.S.A.) media artist and researcher who produces video, installations, archives, artists’ books, workshops, and other pedagogical and communicative actions, across online and offline platforms and often, collectively. Her current work crosses the spaces of contemporary art, education, and media activism and social justice. She has co-founded numerous autonomous cultural organizations, popular education projects, and research networks. She is currently the co-founder of the transnational feminist platform, The Institute of (Im)Possible Subjects, for art, research, activist culture, and publishing. From 1994 – 2007, she was a member of the artists’ collective Video Machete, which created open access media centers and free workshops as a practice of liberatory pedagogy and media production with youth of color, LGBTQ youth, and recent immigrant youth. She is co-chair of the Visual Arts program at the Vermont College of Fine Arts and founding Program Director at the Center for Arts, Design, and Social Research. dalidamariabenfield.info

DATE AND TIME

Sat, June 24, 2017

7:30 PM – 9:30 PM EDT

Add to Calendar

LOCATION

GIBNEY DANCE

280 BROADWAY

STUDIO C

New York, NY 10007

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Alumna Nikki Juen Protest Performance at Trump Tower | Brick x Brick

Hyperallergic except:

“The performance kicked off not long after noon, when 10 women formed a line and joined hands at the back of a small area that had been designated the stage. They wore jumpsuits printed with black-and-white bricks, on top of which were laid colored panels containing texts such as “Bimbo” and “Grab her by the pussy” — all sexist words and phrases uttered by the US president. The women were part of Brick x Brick, a project begun at the Women’s March to form “human ‘walls’ against misogyny,” and they remained in place under the sweltering sun for the next hour and a half.”

To read full article, click here.spy offers | Nike Air Max 270

Three Visual Art Alumni Collaborate in Minneapolis

Friendship is Magic is a collaborative site-specific installation created by artist friends Clea Felien, Damali Abrams the Glitter Priestess, and Ambivalently Yours. The show explores how the enthusiasm, language and rituals of girl culture can be used to represent ideas of friendship as a radical act of resistance in a political climate that is increasingly promoting xenophobia and separatism. In a world where adults are encouraged to cultivate potentially beneficial business connections instead of friendship, what does it mean to celebrate friendship instead?

For one weekend, the three artists from Minneapolis, Montreal, and New York will gather at Spackle Cat Gallery (Northrup King Building Studio 358, 1500 Jackson St NE, Minneapolis) to create an interdisciplinary alternate world where friendship itself is a form of magic.

HOURS:
Friday, May 19th – 5:00-10:00 p.m.
Saturday, May 20nd – 2:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m.
Sunday, May 21st – Noon-5:00 p.m.

 

  • May 19 – May 21
    May 19 at 5 PM to May 21 at 5 PM EDT
  • Spackle Cat Gallery, Northrup King Building, Studio 358, 1500 Jackson St NE, Minneapolis, MN 55413

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Alumnus Michael Ruiz @ San Diego Art Institute

SDAI is pleased to present “Extra-Ordinary Collusion”, an exhibition with twenty-three artist and scientist collaborations, curated by Chi Essary. The opening reception will take place at the San Diego Art Institute, 1439 El Prado, on Saturday, May 20 from 6pm-8pm. The exhibition will run though will run through July 2.

The popular misconception of San Diego as a sleepy beach town ignores the vibrant artist community and undermines the reality of San Diego’s cultural potential. San Diego is not only known as one of the top three biotech capitals in the world, thanks to the presence of research centers like the Salk, Scripps, and the Stanford Consortium, but it is uniquely situated next to the creative hotbed that is Tijuana. Extra-Ordinary Collusion celebrates this rich cultural heritage by fostering innovative exchange between two of San Diego’s great cultural strengths—our thriving scientific and artistic communities.

For this exhibition artists were paired with scientists from the Salk Institute and invited to tour the scientists’ labs and learn about their state-of-the-art research. Using this visit as the impetus for the exhibition, artists created new work based on their conversations and interactions with the scientists. The artists in Extra-Ordinary Collusion come from various disciplines including painting, sculpture, installation, new media, and conceptual art.

Participating artists and scientists are: Cooper Baker (with Jun Wu), Hugo Crosthwaite (with Laura Tan), Einar & Jamex de la Torre (with Amy Rommel), Thomas DeMello (with Carol Marchetto), TML Dunn (with Sreekanth “Shrek” Chalasani), David Fobes (with Tatyana Sharpee), Abbey Hepner (with Mike Avery), Debby & Larry Kline (with Saket Navlakha), Jessica McCambly (with Julie Law), Meegan Nolan (with Manching Ku), Arzu Ozkal (with Janelle Ayres), Philip Petrie (with Ahmet Denli), Irma Sofia Poeter (with Uri Manor), Iana Quesnell (with Corina Antal), Sasha Koozel Reibstein (with Beverly Emerson), Marisol Rendón (with Axel Nimmerjahn), Vincent Robles (with Chen-min Yeh), Michael Ruiz (with Paloma Martinez-Redondo), Ellen Salk (with Tom Albright), Shinpei Takeda (with Tom Albright), Maya VanderSchuit (with Antonio Currias), Vicki Walsh (with Alan Saghatelian), Melissa Walter (with Martin Hetzer) Also on display will be photographs by Josue Castro documenting the scientists in their laboratories.

Please also join us for a series of discussions with some of the artist/scientist teams in Extra-Ordinary Collusion:

Thursday, June 8th, 7pm-9pm ($10, includes appetizers and refreshments) Location: Park 6, 590 Fir Street, San Diego, CA 92101
Vicki Walsh with Alan Saghatelian from the Clayton Foundation Laboratories for Peptide Biology, Einar & Jamex de la Torre with Amy Rommel from the Laboratory of Genetics—Verma, and Abbey Hepner with Mike Avery from John Reynold’s Lab

Wednesday, June 28th, 6pm-8pm ($5, cash bar) Location: San Diego Art Institute, 1439 El Prado, San Diego, CA 92101
Marisol Rendón with Axel Nimmerjahn from the Waitt Advanced Biophotonics Center, David Fobes with Tatyana Sharpee from the Computational Neurobiology Laboratory, and TML Dunn with Sreekanth “Shrek” Chalasani from the Molecular Neurobiology LaboratorySport media | NIKE Chaussures, Sacs, Vetements, Montres, Accessoires, Accessoires-textile, Beaute, Sous-vetements – Livraison Gratuite

Alumna Maura McHugh @ Center for Contemporary Art Santa Fe

Cryin’ Out Loud

April 21 – July 9, 2017 // Muñoz Waxman Gallery

Cryin’ Out Loud is a juried exhibition that examines the role of women’s and femmes’ voices as expressed in art about politics, activism, and emotion. Considering both the metaphoric and literal voice, Cryin’ Out Loud explores and celebrates the use of art as a form of speaking up and out. A large group exhibition of works by selected artists will take place in CCA’s Muñoz Waxman Gallery.

Juror’s Statement:

Cryin’ Out Loud takes each word of this maxim seriously – Crying. Out. Loud. – and navigates the various implications of the phrase, wheter exasperated and fed up (“Oh, for crying out loud!”) or literal, as one who does not hide her desperation or emotion while she is actually “crying out loud”. Similarly, “living out loud” has associations with survivors of abuse, with activism in the LGBTQ community, and with anyone refusing to “be quiet” about issues of oppression, identity and authorship. It is time to speak loudly with our voices and our art; with our intellect and our emotion; with our politics and our personhood.

Throughout history women’s voices, perspectives, and innovations have been undermined by those in power. In order to have their voices heard or published, many women artists and writers have adopted gender neutral or male pseudonyms. Women have fought for their right to vote, are still fighting for wage-equity, and to have equal representation in congress. Speaking and acting out is complicated for women and femmes because of common double standards like the label “hysterical,” for simply speaking her mind. Women have learned to work within these oppressive structures often at the expense of their rights and humanity, and frankly, we are ready for change.

Cryin’ Out Loud proposes that to unabashedly express emotion is a political act. To live out loud is a necessary political gesture and that women’s experience needs to be seen, heard, and cherished. The exhibition will consist of work in all media that embraces emotion as statement; that broadcasts social and political concerns, and that reacts to and resists the structures that continue to oppress us.

About the Juror:

Micol Hebron is an interdisciplinary artist whose practice includes studio work, curating, writing, social media, crowd-sourcing, teaching, and public speaking. Hebron is an Associate Professor of Art at Chapman University; the founder/director of The Situation Room, a resource space for the creative community (in Eagle Rock, CA); the Femmes International Video Art Festival; the Gallery Tally Poster Project about gender equity in contemporary galleries; and the Digital Pasty/ Gender Equity initiative for the internet. In 2016 she was awarded the SPArt grant for Social Practice Art in Los Angeles. Previously, Hebron has been the Chief Curator at the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art; the director of the UCLA Summer Art Institute; an editorial board member at X-Tra magazine; an independent curator; a conservator at LACMA, and the co-founder of Gallery B-12 in Hollywood in the 90s. She has served on advisory boards at Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions, Birch Creek Ranch Residency (Utah), Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and UCLA. She is the founder of the LA Art Girls and the Co-Founder of Fontbron Academy. She employs strategies of consciousness-raising, collaboration, generosity, play, and participation to support and further feminist dialogues in art and life.

Participating Artists:

Robin Adsit, Susan Arena, Susan Begy, Katina Bitsicas, Nikesha Breeze, Marcie Rose Brewer, Dorielle Caimi, Kimberly Callas, Momma Tried, Eliza Fernand, Vanessa Dion Fletcher, Cheri Gaulke, Melissa Friedman, Katya, Grokhovsky, Maureen Hawthorne, Nicola Heindl, Sarah Hewitt, Jessica Fairfax Hirst, Katie Hovencamp, Victoria Hoyt, Megan Jacobs, Kasey Jones, Casey Kauffmann, Courtney Kessel, Ellina Kevorkian, Dave Kube, Alison Kuo, Emily La Cour, Julia Barbosa Landois, Stephanie Lerma, Rebecca Leveille, Jasmine Little, Cecilia McKinnon, Maura McHugh, Melissa Potter and Maggie Puckett, Mary Anna Pomonis and Allison Stewart, Jenn Procacci, Rachel Rivera, Sarah Rockett, Celeia Rocha, Valerie Roybal, Sack (cara despain), Sallie Scheufler, Christy Schwathe, Rebekah Tarín, Kate Cassatt Tatsumi, Charlotte Thurman, Ingrid V. Wells, Quintan Ana Wikswo, Suzanne Wright, Victory Grrls, Alisa Yang

Press on the exhibition:

Albuquerque Journal North

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Winter 2017 Grads

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Holly Britt

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Simone Spruce-Torres

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Lillie Grace

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Vicki Knipp

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Lori Victor

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Guy Coffin

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Jon Chapman

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Moksha Sommer

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Luann Bice

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Matthew Whitney @ Sojourn Arts | Louisville, KY

Responding to Violence and the Gun

On view February 12 – April 9, 2017

RECEPTION AND PANEL DISCUSSION Saturday March 18, 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. with the panel discussion at 6:30 p.m.

During 2016, in our small neighborhood of Shelby Park, 6 people died as a result of gun violence. Across the city in 2016, Louisville experienced more homicides than any other year on record. And across the U.S. in 2016 there were a total of 15,010 deaths from gunshots.

In this exhibit, artists have responded to violence and the gun with a variety of approaches.

Matthew Whitney is spelling out the word Warzone across Seattle with his feet. He describes these walks and the drawings made afterwards as part protest march and part active prayer.

By concentrating on the problem of violence in our city and across the country, these artists give us opportunity to mourn the lives lost to violence, to consider why so many are fascinated with guns, how guns relate to gender and youth, and how violence re-shapes our relationship to public space.

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Alumna Leah Grimaldi @ Atlantic Works Gallery

Upcoming Exhibitions

New Members

Please join us in welcoming our new members

February 4 – 23, 2017

Dominick Takis’s work explores landscape and surface themes related to travels and ancestry, paint, transparencies, lichen and mixed media textures. Religious imagery creates a surface that pulls the viewer in. The symbiotic relationship between lichen and algae is a metaphorical relationship to Takis’s ancestral roots.

Internal feelings of displacement, abandonment, and reconciliation guide Curran Broderick to form a connection with land. He was abandoned as an infant, adopted, and raised in America. He uses photography to establish roots within landscape and establish a sense of belonging.

Brian Reardon uses oil paint to depict common objects such as tractors, toys and colanders. Reardon gives his everyday objects significance using color and a sensitive brush stroke, creating luscious and generous paintings.

Using painting, drawing and cutting, Leah Grimaldi explores anxiety and joy—emotions that often coexist—in the context of her culture. In her new body of work she references the coastal New England Landscape, a site of beauty and tension as it changes due to human population growth, development and climate change.

 

Opening Reception: Saturday, February 4, 2016, 6-9 PM
Third Thursday Reception: Thursday, February 16, 2016, 6-9 PM
Gallery Hours: Saturdays & Sundays, 1-5 PM or by appointment

 

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