Alumnus Corey Pickett @ Form & Concept Benefit Show, Santa Fe

Guns to Art Benefit Show

November 7-17, 2017
Reception & Live Auction: Friday, November 17, 4-7 pm

RSVP on Facebook.

Decommissioned firearms aren’t the most pliable artistic medium, but that hasn’t stopped faculty and students at Santa Fe Community College from reshaping them into stunning artworks. They’ve been hard at work bending, slicing, shredding and melting old guns into sculptures, jewelry and even apparel. This fall, the art will appear at a special reception, live auction and silent auction in support of art and welding scholarships at SFCC and the 501(c)3 non-partisan organization New Mexicans to Prevent Gun Violence (NMPGV), along with juried works by artists from across the world that reflect on gun violence prevention. The Guns to Art Benefit Show runs November 7-17 at form & concept, with a reception and live auction on Friday, November 17 from 4 to 7 pm.

“When we first started, people would slam doors in our faces,” says Miranda Viscoli, co-founder and co-president of NMPGV. “They’d say, ‘You guys are not going to take our guns.’ This event is a culmination of our efforts to shift the conversation towards responsible gun ownership and gun violence prevention.” In August 2016, NMPGV launched a gun buyback program that invited gun owners to anonymously turn in unwanted firearms to New Mexico law enforcement. The Santa Fe Community College Art Department offered to turn part of the stockpile into art, and a collaboration with the Colorado-based RAWTools project called “Guns to Gardens” transformed the guns into gardening tools. Creations from both programs will appear in the live and silent auctions at the Guns to Art benefit.

NMPGV formed in 2013, the year of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. Not long after the tragedy, a group of concerned citizens came together to face some tough realities about gun violence in New Mexico. They learned that in 2013, the third leading cause of death for New Mexican children was homicide, with 74% of those deaths occurring by firearm. Faced with this troubling statistic and others like it, the group leapt into action, designing programs that could curb firearm injury and death and promote responsible gun ownership through public health, education, advocacy and public awareness efforts.

“Over the years, we’ve developed a multipronged approach to build trust in the community,” says Viscoli. “We know the police, we know local politicians on both sides of the aisle, we know the press, and we know community members.” The programs they’ve launched include Murals to End Gun Violence and the Student Pledge Against Gun Violence, both of which engage  Santa Fe public school students. Since these initiatives started, there has been a 54% drop in local students bringing weapons to school. NMPGV also maintains an interactive map documenting incidents of gun-related violence and death in every New Mexico county. “Guns to Gardens” and the collaboration with Santa Fe Community College are also ongoing projects.

“We love the way NMPGV takes an intersectional approach to their projects and programs,” says Frank Rose, Gallery Director at form & concept. “Guns to Art brings so many of these local stories together, and also invites artists from across the world to express powerful viewpoints on gun violence prevention.” The Guns to Art Benefit Show opens November 7, coinciding with the launch of an online and in-gallery silent auction. Bidding for the silent auction will continue during the Guns to Art reception on November 17, and a live auction moderated by Jake Lovato will also take place at the event.

NMPGV, SFCC and form & concept would like to thank Mayor Javier Gonzales, the City of Santa Fe and Santa Fe Police Chief Patrick Gallagher for their support of this exhibition.

Learn more about the reception & live auction.
Enter the Guns to Art juried show.

Form and Concept

435 S Guadalupe St, Santa Fe, NM 87501| 505.982.8111

 

Alumnus David French “Was/Is” exhibition @ JacksoNewark Gallery

Kristin J. DeAngelis has partnered with JacksoNewark Gallery to curate and present the works artist David French

David French‘s works are fluid gestures, yet frozen in time. But they appear as if it is still occurring. The opening and the show are at JacksoNewark Gallery at 650 Newark Street located inside Urban Consign & Design in Hoboken.

For more information on JacksoNewark Gallery, please feel free to follow on Facebook JacksoNewark Gallery or contact Paul D. Fitzgerald of Urban Consign & Design.

650 Newark Street
Hoboken, New Jersey 07307

Visiting Faculty Member Việt Le Selected for NTU Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore Residency Program

Residency Programme: April 2018–March 2019

NTU Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore
Gillman Barracks
43 Malan Road
Singapore 109443

T +65 6460 0300
[email protected]

ntu.ccasingapore.org
Facebook / Instagram / Twitter

NTU Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore (NTU CCA Singapore) is pleased to announce the artists for the 5th cycle of its Residencies Programme (April 2018–March 2019):

Julieta Aranda (Mexico), Izat Arif (Malaysia), Adrián Balesca (Ecuador), Ludovica Carbotta (Italy), Kent Chan (Singapore), Sean Connelly (United States), Daniel Hui (Singapore), Takuji Kogo (Japan), Susanne Kriemann (Germany), Phyoe Kyi (Myanmar), Việt Le (United States), Soyo Lee (South Korea), Lim Sokchanlina (Cambodia), John Low (Singapore), Luca Lum (Singapore), Raafat Majzoub (Lebanon), Falke Pisano (Netherlands), Tan Kai Syng (Singapore), Zai Tang (United Kingdom/Singapore), John Torres (Philippines), Wu Tsang (United States), Susie Wong (Singapore), Wu Mali (Taiwan)

In keeping with NTU CCA Singapore’s holistic approach to the cultural histories and the production of knowledge, the Residencies Programme is distinctly research-oriented and supports artists by granting them a concentrated period of time, a studio, and feedback from in-house curators and international Curators-in-Residence to develop their practice without the pressure of production deadlines. Dedicated to established and emerging artists from Singapore and abroad, this studio-based programme values the open-ended nature of artistic research and embraces multiform expressions of creative enquiry.

Artists-in-Residence receive a studio space and a monthly stipend. The programme also fully funds travel costs and accommodation for foreign artists. To facilitate a dynamic dialogue across different geopolitical contexts and to create an always-diverse community, three studios are reserved for Singapore-based artists, two are dedicated to artists from Asia, and the remaining two are allocated to artists from elsewhere in the world.

Artists are invited to apply for the residency through a nomination process. While in past editions, nominators were international curators, for the 5th cycle, the nominators were exclusively artists. The Centre invited former Artists-in-Residence and established artists from all over the world to put forth the names of their fellows who can most benefit from a research-driven residency in the context of Singapore. This peer-to-peer process furthers the presence of the artists themselves at the core of the Residencies Programme, drawing upon the nominating artists’ generosity, insight, and direct knowledge of the most relevant developments in contemporary art practices.

During their stay, lasting three months for international artists and six months for the Singapore-based artists, Artists-in-Residence become active agents of the Centre’s cultural life through public programmes that range from open studios, artist talks, panel discussions, to screenings and performances.

The final participants in the Residencies Programme were selected by a review panel composed of Ute Meta Bauer (Founding Director, NTU CCA Singapore and Professor, School of Art, Design and Media, NTU), Joselina Cruz (Director, Museum of Contemporary Art and Design, De La Salle College, Manila, Philippines), Low Eng Teong (Assistant Chief Executive, Sector Development Group, National Arts Council, Singapore), Shabbir Hussain Mustafa (Senior Curator, National Gallery Singapore), and Wong Chen-Hsi (Assistant Professor, School of Art, Design and Media, NTU).

Reflecting a wide range of methodologies and critical attitudes, the artists’ proposals were reviewed on the basis of their relevance to Climates. Habitats. Environments, the Centre’s overarching research framework for the next three years (2017–19), and/or their interest to explore issues that address the complexity of cultural and colonial histories of the region as well as global geopolitics. Anna Lovecchio, NTU CCA Singapore Curator, Residencies, states: “Against a culture increasingly veered towards production and exposure, the Residencies Programme is committed to the rather idealistic mission to value the process of artistic research over its product. This kind of residency has a great potential: it can be a retreat, a networking platform, and a sounding board for artists to test their ideas and experiment new directions in the development of their practice.”

Since the programme launched four years ago, it has hosted more than 100 artists, curators, writers, and researchers who have significantly contributed to the Centre’s dynamic environment of experimentation and exchange.

 

For more information about the Residencies Programme, visit www.ntu.ccasingapore.org/residencies/.

The Residencies Programme for Singaporean artists is generously supported by a grant from the National Arts Council, Singapore.

NTU CCA Singapore wishes to thank all those who contributed to our 2016 fundraising auction, the proceeds of which went towards the sustainability of this programme.

 

Located in Gillman Barracks, the NTU Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore (NTU CCA Singapore) is a national research centre of Nanyang Technological University and is supported by a grant from the Economic Development Board. The Centre is unique in its threefold constellation of research and academic programmes, international exhibitions, and residencies, positioning itself as a space for critical discourse and diverse forms of knowledge production. The Centre focuses on Spaces of the Curatorial in Singapore, Southeast Asia, and beyond, as well as engages in multi-layered research topics.

Nanyang Technological University Singapore (NTU) is a research-intensive public university in Singapore with colleges of Engineering, Business, Science, and Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences. NTU is ranked 11th globally and placed 1st amongst the world’s best young universities.

Faculty Member Cauleen Smith in Artforum

The artist and filmmaker Cauleen Smith, who recently relocated from Chicago to Los Angeles, rarely tethers her work to bare reality. Her latest film, Triangle Trade, 2017—made in collaboration with Canadian artists Jérôme Havre and Camille Turner—renders three new, fantastical realms, inhabited only by the puppet likenesses of the work’s three creators. Triangle Trade is on view at Gallery TPW in Toronto until November 11, 2017.

TWO YEARS AGO, I visited Toronto to do a site visit at Gallery TPW, where I had been slated to have a solo exhibition. I wanted to make a film in the city for that show, so I started meeting with a lot of black artists living in Toronto, hoping to find a few collaborators. I became really intrigued by many of these artists’ ideas about blackness; I sensed a lot of frustration about how whenever black history or experience is discussed, it’s always from an American point of view. But there’s a long history of black people emigrating from the Caribbean to Canada, which seems to create a kind of double colonial consciousness—an echo in terms of belonging and not belonging.

Ultimately, I chose to collaborate with the performance and multimedia artist Camille Turner and the sculptor Jérôme Havre. So much of Camille’s work is made through a speculative, science-fiction lens, and she loves to use Afro-Futurist metaphors to talk about alienation. It became clear we’d be able to have a very natural conversation within a project. And I just thought Jérôme’s work was so fresh—I had never seen anything like it. He was making things that—to me—were, crucially, not like anything that an American artist would make.

For example, Magnifique Isolation, 2009, was a stunning installation that he made of small, distorted human figures that hung from the ceiling, suspended in midair. I can’t really think of any African American artist who would hang a body. That decision was so intriguing, because it shows how the weight of history always presses itself upon aesthetic decisions.

I have to stress that our film, Triangle Trade, is equally mine, Camille’s, and Jérôme’s. Each of our segments in the film function independently of one another, and our respective puppets never really engage in dialogue. Even the terrains and topographies of our separate segments remain really distinct, which might, in some way, be symptomatic of the black diasporic condition.

My segment takes place on a volcano. My puppet talks about how it’s impossible for anyone to claim one, because it’s literally made up of matter coming from the core of the earth. I’ve been thinking about that concept a lot lately, and about how North American land is completely soaked in blood. It’s become increasingly troubling to me, especially when I try to imagine futures or forms of liberation or justice.

New land seems necessary, but, of course, all the land everywhere has been claimed and colonized many times over. I thought about other planets, but there’s a strange colonial project in that too. So, really, the only place you can arrive at and settle in without doing harm is at a lava berg.

The terrain in Camille’s segment is a completely imaginary and allegorical world. It looks nothing like Earth, and she describes it only in magical terms, rather than empirical ones. Jérôme’s is an island, but, more than that, it’s a kind of meta-space or feeling—the feeling of being adrift. It was an important challenge to create Triangle Trade together without necessarily agreeing on what time or space we were in. I think that’s an interesting lesson on how to get along with people in general. You may not all have agreements on where, and when, and who we are.

 

Featured image: Jérôme Havre, Cauleen Smith, and Camille Turner, Triangle Trade, 2017, HD video, color, sound, 14 minutes 31 seconds.

Associated link.

Alumna and Curator Patricia Miranda: Fall Exhibitions, NYC

Patricia Miranda Fall Exhibitions and Events.
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Indigo: The Seventh Color
at LABspace 
Artists: Christine AaronBeth DaryGrace DeGennaroLorrie Fredette, Valerie Hammond, Mary HarkJeanne HeifetzLotta HellebergBrece HoneycuttPatricia MirandaPaula Overbay
Artist Reception – October 14, 5 – 7:30pm
On view October 14-November 4, 2017 

Last year a group of artists gathered at my studio for a weekend of Indigo dyeing. Lorrie Fredette and Brece Honeycutt were inspired to curate an exhibition – I am honored to show with these artists!

LABspace is located at 2462 NY Rt 23, Hillsdale, NY, 12529
Gallery Hours:  Saturday 11-5pm & Sunday 11-4pm

I had the wonderful honor to write the catalog essay for artist Lori Glavin‘s exhibition of paintings and collages at The George Gallery in Charleston SC.
“The juxtaposition of hard-edged collages and gestural paintings highlights Glavin’s central painterly concerns, lending the two genres a familial conviviality that might otherwise not be evident. Together they reveal an ongoing artistic dialogue in their penchant for awkward biomorphic shapes, unexpected overlap, crooked line, and masterful tertiary color….”
Read the full essay here.
www.loriglavin.com
Amazing powerhouse artist, publisher, artist advocate, and dear friend Sharon Louden will be a Visiting Lecturer at Lyme Academy on Thursday, October 19, talking about her new book in the series, Living and Sustaining a Creative Life: Cultural Producers. 

Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts, University of New Haven 
Thursday, October 19
Reception 5pm, Lecture 6pm

I will join Sharon after her lecture for a Q&A- it’s sure to be a lively one!

Tickets are $15, free for students. Purchase tickets here
Lyme Academy College is located at 84 Lyme Street, Old Lye CT. Directions here.
image: Sharon Louden; MERGE AT UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT, Oak Hall, at the University of Connecticut in Storrs, CT, 2013. Detail.

On November 7 I will introduce a double feature about the artists Yvonne Jacquette and Rudy Burckhardt, and lead a Q&A afterwards. The Kate Museum is  lovely theater with a full roster of programming and the film series always includes a lively discussion after, so please join me on November 7 and check out the other films.

Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts
Bridging the Arts Film Series
Tuesday, November 7, 5:30 p.m.
at the Katherine Hepburn Museum in Old Saybrook, CT.

The Kate Museum, 300 Main Street, Old Saybrook, CT 06475. Tickets $15 per film.
Bridging the Arts is a curated film series co-sponsored by Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts and the Kate. The series features a selection of art films produced by the highly-regarded Checkerboard Film Foundation and includes a brief lecture before each film.

In September I had a great time participating in 
CENTERPIECE: A Sculpture Garden & Music Pop-Up
a BombPop!Up Production
at Pete’s Candy Store in Brooklyn, NY.

Curated by the ever amazing duo Gaby Collins-Fernandez and Drea Cofield
with Leah Dixon, Sacha Ingber, Aaron Fowler, Leah Guadagnoli, Marie Lorenz, Tammy Nguyen, Patricia Miranda, Cal Siegel, Tom Simon, John Szlasa, Alina Tenser, Karen Tepaz, & Emmy Thelander. See photos here.

Bomb Pop! Up is a Brooklyn-based artist-run initiative producing pop-up Art & Music shows,  Brooklyn NY.

on-site installation: cochineal dyed doilies, twine, tree.

Alumna Nikki Juen in Pussy Party Collective Zine

This is Our Pussy Zine includes original artwork by Nikki Juen, Alex Bowman Ed Fella, Guts & Glory, ITWST, Lisa Junius, Kevin Lyons and many more.

LIMITED EDITION 5″ X 8″ | 54 PAGE | TWO COLOR RISOGRAPH CREATED WITH LOVE IN OAKLAND, CA.

100% of profits donated to Planned Parenthood. 

Alumna Jeanette Hart-mann: Seedbroadcast, print edition

The Mobile Seed Story Broadcasting Station is an old bread truck that has been retrofitted into a solar-powered, grassroots roving, seed story shout-out vehicle committed to examining the inter-connections between people, seeds and agri-culture, through the performance, listening, and sharing of seed stories.

It began in 2012, with a cross-country tour of seed libraries, from New Mexico to Vermont. Hosting public events with these seedy partners, as well as at farmers’ markets, community gardens, and with arts organizations, the Mobile Seed Story Broadcasting Station gathered seed stories via audio interviews and broadcast these along with seed sovereignty materials through the mobile van and the internet.

The Broadcasting Station houses several multi-media systems for playing seed stories in the public: exterior speakers, interior tablets, and video monitors. It also has an interactive bulletin board and copy center, which people can use to collect seed information to take home. The bulletin board also acts as a display area where participants can post drawings, writings, thoughts, and pictures of their own. A library of books is available about seed saving, agri-culture, and seed freedom for everyone to use. Seeds from Fodder Project Collaborative Research Farm are on display for people to look at, touch, and listen to. Occasionally there are seeds to share too.

What are Seed Stories?

Seed Stories are the grassroot voices of courage, desire, memory, and dreams. They speak towards the complex relationships between people, seeds, food, ecology, and agency. They are as diverse as the places that nourish them and the people that breath life into them. Seed stories are stories of knowledge, ideas, and actions, as well as histories and thoughts toward the future. There are many, many seed stories and everyone has one. We all eat.

The Seedproject Agriculture Journal is now available in print.

Alumnus Corey Pickett @ Anya Tish Gallery

For Immediate Release Contact: Anya Tish

Anya Tish Gallery

anyatishgallery.com

[email protected]

713.524.2299

FREEZE! Shannon Cannings • Corey Pickett | October 13 – November 11, 2017

Artists Reception: October 13, 6:00 – 8:30 pm

Artists Q&A and Walk-Through: October 14, 1:00 – 2:00 pm

Anya Tish Gallery is thrilled to present FREEZE!, a two-person exhibition featuring paintings and drawings by Shannon Cannings and soft sculptures by Corey Pickett. Through the lens of their own race and gender, both artists question the role of guns in our society in order to appeal for the re-evaluation of current gun legislation.

By looking past the veneer of consumerism, which has distorted and glorified the meaning of ‘gunplay’, Shannon Cannings’ oil paintings explore how toy guns normalize gun culture and create a tolerance for violent language and behavior from childhood. Using the candy-colored and eye-catching visuals of advertising, Cannings’ work draws attention to the juxtaposition of gun violence and the allegedly harmless children’s toy. Each painting is meticulously executed to spotlight the shiny, colored plastic of the gun and its glossy, light reflecting packaging to create an almost irresistible product. Cannings’ works are the product of a mother’s meditation on the convoluted messages of advertising and a response to the controversy surrounding gun control.

In place of gunmetal and steel, Corey Pickett’s immense gun sculptures are stuffed with foam and upholstered in a mélange of versicolor patterns. Pickett draws inspiration from his research of the middle passage and uses Victorian and Dutch textiles to visually reference the past conditions of African-Americans. The artist states “Initially these objects were in response to gun violence towards African-Americans; however, my work has expanded to gun violence against all humans”. Pickett’s ebullient soft sculptures transpose the issue of gun violence to create a comfortable and secure environment in which to contemplate the role of guns in our society.

Shannon Cannings earned her Master of Fine Arts from Syracuse University, New York, and has since exhibited her work across the United States in museums and institutions including Art Museum of Southeast Texas, Beaumont, TX and Tyler Museum of Art, Tyler, TX. In 2001, she was selected to represent the West Texas region in the Texas Biennale. Her work has been featured in print and online publications including New American Paintings and the Houston Press, and Glasstire.

Corey Pickett received his Bachelor of Fine Arts in 2000 and his Master of Education in 2008 from Eastern New Mexico University. In 2017 he is to receive his Master of Fine Arts from the Vermont College of Fine Art. Pickett has exhibited his work throughout the United States in institutions such as the National African American Museum and Cultural Center and is a recipient of the International Sculptural Center’s 2017 Outstanding Student Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Award.

Anya Tish Gallery . 4411 Montrose Blvd. . Houston Texas 77006 . 713.524.2299 . anyatishgallery.com . [email protected]

Alumna Renee Couture @ Gray Space

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Renee Couture [email protected]

Web: http://grayspaceproject.com/

GRAY SPACE: Oregon Artists Present

A Cube-Shaped Itinerant Art Space

Viewing in the Northbound Cabin Creek Rest Area, 20 miles north of Roseburg (milepost 142), Saturday September 30, 11 am

(September 2017,  Cabin Creek Rest Area/I-5, Oregon) GRAY SPACE is a cube-shaped itinerant art space, welded and wheeled by artists. The artists of the GRAY SPACE group will install their individual work inside the 6’x6’x6’ GRAY SPACE and park it for a day at various locations throughout Oregon. Each artist will create a different art installation. GRAY SPACE intentionally engages an audience without the confines and expectations of a gallery or art center.

Its first travel location along the I-5 corridor is the Northbound Cabin Creek Rest Area, just 20 miles north of Roseburg. GRAY SPACE will be deployed Saturday, September 30, 11 am – 3 pm. This event is free and open to the public.

Renee Couture is the second artist to install work in GRAY SPACE module. This work, titled The Highest Fence, focuses on ideas of boundaries and borders – how they impact our lives and how we move through the world. She explores this phenomena through layers and layers of large-scale, cut paper fences as a fence is a man-made barrier that encloses, surrounds, confines, separates, protects, and shows ownership. The idea for The Highest Fence emerged from a variety of sources including the artist’s own life living in rural southern Oregon’s O&C “checkerboard land ownership”,  proverbs, and recent political commentary on fence/wall building.

ABOUT THE ARTIST:

Renee Couture works in sculpture, photography, and drawing. After receiving her BA and before receiving her MFA in Visual Art, Renee rambled about the United States and South America working a wide range of jobs from camp counselor to wild land fire fighter to gourmet goat cheese maker, international backpacker to bank employee. She has exhibited her work nationally in group exhibitions and as a solo artist. Renee has won two Career Opportunity Grants from the Oregon Arts Commission, and also participated in residency programs at Jentel, Vermont Studio Center, Playa, Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts, and Djerassi. She jumped at the opportunity to be participate in GRAY SPACE project out of a drive expand art practice and connect with new audiences. Renee is currently Adjunct Fine Art Faculty at Umpqua Community College. Visit Artist’s Website: www.rcoutureart.com

ABOUT GRAY SPACE PROJECT:

The GRAY SPACE artists are Kate Ali, Lee ImonenMichael BoonstraKathleen CaprarioSandee McGeeAndrew MyersLeah WilsonRenee Couture and Vicki Amorose. This group of Oregon artists gathers around an ideaphoric concept: the traveling installation space, freely accessible to random audiences. In its first year, GRAY SPACE will be parked at various locations in Oregon. The artist will be present to talk about their work. GRAY SPACE intentionally engages an audience without the confines and expectations of a gallery or art center. While on site, the project activates public space and explores the interplay between site, context, art and viewer. GRAY SPACE artists find momentum together and tap the generative resource of each other’s creative drive.

CONTACT: Email Renee Couture [email protected]

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Featured image: image credit: Kate Ali, Gray Space Specs