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Alumnus Corey Pickett @ Form & Concept Benefit Show, Santa Fe

Guns to Art Benefit Show

November 7-17, 2017
Reception & Live Auction: Friday, November 17, 4-7 pm

RSVP on Facebook.

Decommissioned firearms aren’t the most pliable artistic medium, but that hasn’t stopped faculty and students at Santa Fe Community College from reshaping them into stunning artworks. They’ve been hard at work bending, slicing, shredding and melting old guns into sculptures, jewelry and even apparel. This fall, the art will appear at a special reception, live auction and silent auction in support of art and welding scholarships at SFCC and the 501(c)3 non-partisan organization New Mexicans to Prevent Gun Violence (NMPGV), along with juried works by artists from across the world that reflect on gun violence prevention. The Guns to Art Benefit Show runs November 7-17 at form & concept, with a reception and live auction on Friday, November 17 from 4 to 7 pm.

“When we first started, people would slam doors in our faces,” says Miranda Viscoli, co-founder and co-president of NMPGV. “They’d say, ‘You guys are not going to take our guns.’ This event is a culmination of our efforts to shift the conversation towards responsible gun ownership and gun violence prevention.” In August 2016, NMPGV launched a gun buyback program that invited gun owners to anonymously turn in unwanted firearms to New Mexico law enforcement. The Santa Fe Community College Art Department offered to turn part of the stockpile into art, and a collaboration with the Colorado-based RAWTools project called “Guns to Gardens” transformed the guns into gardening tools. Creations from both programs will appear in the live and silent auctions at the Guns to Art benefit.

NMPGV formed in 2013, the year of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. Not long after the tragedy, a group of concerned citizens came together to face some tough realities about gun violence in New Mexico. They learned that in 2013, the third leading cause of death for New Mexican children was homicide, with 74% of those deaths occurring by firearm. Faced with this troubling statistic and others like it, the group leapt into action, designing programs that could curb firearm injury and death and promote responsible gun ownership through public health, education, advocacy and public awareness efforts.

“Over the years, we’ve developed a multipronged approach to build trust in the community,” says Viscoli. “We know the police, we know local politicians on both sides of the aisle, we know the press, and we know community members.” The programs they’ve launched include Murals to End Gun Violence and the Student Pledge Against Gun Violence, both of which engage  Santa Fe public school students. Since these initiatives started, there has been a 54% drop in local students bringing weapons to school. NMPGV also maintains an interactive map documenting incidents of gun-related violence and death in every New Mexico county. “Guns to Gardens” and the collaboration with Santa Fe Community College are also ongoing projects.

“We love the way NMPGV takes an intersectional approach to their projects and programs,” says Frank Rose, Gallery Director at form & concept. “Guns to Art brings so many of these local stories together, and also invites artists from across the world to express powerful viewpoints on gun violence prevention.” The Guns to Art Benefit Show opens November 7, coinciding with the launch of an online and in-gallery silent auction. Bidding for the silent auction will continue during the Guns to Art reception on November 17, and a live auction moderated by Jake Lovato will also take place at the event.

NMPGV, SFCC and form & concept would like to thank Mayor Javier Gonzales, the City of Santa Fe and Santa Fe Police Chief Patrick Gallagher for their support of this exhibition.

Learn more about the reception & live auction.
Enter the Guns to Art juried show.

Form and Concept

435 S Guadalupe St, Santa Fe, NM 87501| 505.982.8111

 

Alumna Nikki Juen in Pussy Party Collective Zine

This is Our Pussy Zine includes original artwork by Nikki Juen, Alex Bowman Ed Fella, Guts & Glory, ITWST, Lisa Junius, Kevin Lyons and many more.

LIMITED EDITION 5″ X 8″ | 54 PAGE | TWO COLOR RISOGRAPH CREATED WITH LOVE IN OAKLAND, CA.

100% of profits donated to Planned Parenthood. 

Alumna Jeanette Hart-mann: Seedbroadcast, print edition

The Mobile Seed Story Broadcasting Station is an old bread truck that has been retrofitted into a solar-powered, grassroots roving, seed story shout-out vehicle committed to examining the inter-connections between people, seeds and agri-culture, through the performance, listening, and sharing of seed stories.

It began in 2012, with a cross-country tour of seed libraries, from New Mexico to Vermont. Hosting public events with these seedy partners, as well as at farmers’ markets, community gardens, and with arts organizations, the Mobile Seed Story Broadcasting Station gathered seed stories via audio interviews and broadcast these along with seed sovereignty materials through the mobile van and the internet.

The Broadcasting Station houses several multi-media systems for playing seed stories in the public: exterior speakers, interior tablets, and video monitors. It also has an interactive bulletin board and copy center, which people can use to collect seed information to take home. The bulletin board also acts as a display area where participants can post drawings, writings, thoughts, and pictures of their own. A library of books is available about seed saving, agri-culture, and seed freedom for everyone to use. Seeds from Fodder Project Collaborative Research Farm are on display for people to look at, touch, and listen to. Occasionally there are seeds to share too.

What are Seed Stories?

Seed Stories are the grassroot voices of courage, desire, memory, and dreams. They speak towards the complex relationships between people, seeds, food, ecology, and agency. They are as diverse as the places that nourish them and the people that breath life into them. Seed stories are stories of knowledge, ideas, and actions, as well as histories and thoughts toward the future. There are many, many seed stories and everyone has one. We all eat.

The Seedproject Agriculture Journal is now available in print.

Alumnus Mark Read in From Outrage to Action Exhibition @ Gallatin Galleries

In conjunction with The Gallatin Climate Change Initiative: A Conference, which will run from September 14-15,2017, NYU Gallatin’s, The Gallatin Galleries will present the exhibition From Outrage to Action, which includes work from artists, journalists, and scientists, all of whom seek to address and act on the issue of climate change.

Artists Reception Monday, September 18, 2017, 6-8pm.

NYU Gallatin School of Individualize Study

1 Washington PL, New York, NY 10003

Participating Artists:

Agnes Denes  •  Ismail Ferdous  •  Gideon Mendel    Civic Laboratory for Environmental Action Research (CLEAR)  •   Mark Read and Grayson Earle Architecture and Urban Design LAB 2017 sponsored by Global Design NYU •   Mary Mattingly  • The Yes Men •  nadahada

Ceremony of Innocence 

Video Installation
Water, Steel, Oil Drum, Video Projection

The title of this piece is taken from William Butler Yeats’ poem, The Second Coming, excerpted below. The projected image, , is a newly introduced international symbol for extinction. The sunken image, , is a recognized international astronomical symbol for Earth. The artists will be replacing the block of ice each day throughout the weeklong exhibit, at approximately 3:00pm, except for Sunday, September 17th.

Excerpt from The Second Coming

“Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.”

– William Butler Yeats, The Second Coming

Grayson Earles diverse technological practice is unified by a political approach to media making. Employing video games, video projection, algorithmic audiovisual generation, biological organisms, and robotics, his work tends to intervene on physical spaces and entrenched ideas. His creative practice articulates a repositioning of resistance to power that invites participation from reluctant citizens.
Earle (b. 1987) lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. He teaches at Hunter College, split between the Computer Science, Film and Media, Integrated Media Arts, and Studio Art MFA programs. This interdisciplinary posture is emblematic to his work as an artist, and is an approach he proselytizes in his courses on game programming, electronics, and generative art.
Recent displays of his work include SeoulArts in South Korea; Eastern Bloc and Centre Phi in Montreal; the Brooklyn Museum, Macy Gallery, and Babycastles in New York City; and the Media Arts Festival in Tokyo. He has published essays on the socioeconomic implications of the Cold War on abstract expressionism in the United States and Russia, as well as new methods for rhetorical approaches in video games

Mark Read is best known as the artist-activist that produced the “Occupy Wall Street Bat Signal” in November of 2011. Subsequent to that projection-intervention Read initiated The Illuminator project, which has gone on to produce hundreds of projection-interventions around the world. The Illuminator’s work has received wide acclaim from both social activists and the art world. Their work has been featured in academic publications such as Public Art Dialogue, and exhibited in galleries and museums, including the Brooklyn Museum. In 2016 The Illuminator was Artist in Residence at the Hemispheric Institute for Performance and Politics. Read teaches courses on art and politics at New York University, where he is employed as an adjunct professor.

Alumni Yukiyo Kawano Interviewed

A visual artist and a choreographer come together for an Aug. 9 performance work that bears witness to the annihilation of two entire cities and the complex Japanese and American narratives therein.

A scene from a prior performance of "Suspended Moment".

A scene from a prior performance of “Suspended Moment”.

Courtesy of Yukiyo Kawano

Seventy-two years ago, American pilots dropped atomic bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. To this day, historians debate whether, as the U.S. maintained, the bombings were necessary to end World War II in the Pacific Theater, or whether, as some critics hold, they constituted war crimes.

Visual artist Yukiyo Kawano and choreographer Meshi Chavez are the creators of “Suspended Moment,” a multidisciplinary performance work they developed with composer Lisa DeGrace and poet Allison Cobb.

Kawano is from Hiroshima; Chavez grew up in Albuquerque — close enough to the Manhattan Project to have a feel for the American side of this history. They’ve performed this work in places with strong ties to atomic history, like Los Alamos, New Mexico, the Hanford Site, and are now bringing it to Portland for a fifth incarnation.

Chavez’s practice is based in the Japanese performance style butoh. You may have seen it performed by dancers in white makeup, moving with infinitesimal slowness. But Chavez’s style is something more kinetic and stately. In some sequences, he puts himself through organic contortions, twisting and spinning almost out of control. Others are direct references to everyday activities on either side of the Pacific.

Here are some highlights of the conversation.

 

Visual Art Alumna Nikki Juen Colab Featured in Brooklyn Rail

Article by Kathy Brew

(excerpt)

Art Rising took place at the Trump Tower Public Garden on June 14th, which happens to be Donald Trump’s birthday and Flag Day. It was the latest in a series of actions that have been using this not-so-known public space as a “living lab” to mobilize people around the risks of the Trump presidency—particularly his plan to slash federal funding for the arts.

The event was organized by Take Trump Tower, and curated by Caterina Bartha. As stated in the program notes: “The artists invite you to enjoy the performances and provoke Trump on his birthday inside his home.”

The crowd was mainly a mix of artists and activists, combined with tourists who were coming to the building because it is the home of the POTUS, including some Trump supporters who happened upon the event, along with some Trump Tower security folks hovering on the sidelines, observing with scrutiny (not to mention the presence of police and secret service members as you enter the building).

Things kicked off at noon with Brick x Brick, a group of women dressed in black and white outfits that included text of many of Trump’s misogynist quotes, standing firm as a wall/backdrop for the hour-long event. Lucy Sexton from Dancenoise, who performs as The Factress, was the emcee/host and welcomed Jimmy Van Bramer, the City Council majority leader and chairman of the council’s cultural affairs committee, who spoke of the importance of government funding and saving the NEA. Then the performances began.

To read full article, click here.

Photo by Kathy Brew

Alumna Nikki Juen Protest Performance at Trump Tower | Brick x Brick

Hyperallergic except:

“The performance kicked off not long after noon, when 10 women formed a line and joined hands at the back of a small area that had been designated the stage. They wore jumpsuits printed with black-and-white bricks, on top of which were laid colored panels containing texts such as “Bimbo” and “Grab her by the pussy” — all sexist words and phrases uttered by the US president. The women were part of Brick x Brick, a project begun at the Women’s March to form “human ‘walls’ against misogyny,” and they remained in place under the sweltering sun for the next hour and a half.”

To read full article, click here.

Co-Chair Dalida María Benfield Collaborates In Barcelona

INTERSECTION | INTERVENTION | INTERPLAY
Gender, Collaboration and Counter-Memory in Migratory Times and Spaces

An afternoon intersecting interventions focused on technologies of collaboration to reimagine gender, history, memory, futures, and communities, with the collective projects Diasporas Críticas, Migratory Times, and the Museum of Random Memory.

Using as a taking off point the decolonial feminist philosopher María Lugones’ phrase “playfulness, world traveling and loving perception,” the public is invited to engage in these art based research projects that explore these actions as forms of reimagining and remaking social relations.

Date

May 31, 2017
15:00 – 19:30 p.m.

Place
Museu del Disseny de Barcelona
Floor -1 – Room B

Conducted by
The Museum of Random Memory/futuremaking.space
Diasporas Críticas and Migratory Times
the Institute of (im)Possible Subjects

 

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PROGRAMME

15:00 – 16:30The Museum of Random Memory
Conducted by MoRM: Museum of Random Memory/futuremaking.space

“Do you have something you would like to remember? Something you think should be forgotten? We would like you to contribute to our temporary permanent collection.”

What is a memory?
What is it good for?
How do we remember?
How do we forget?

These are a few of the questions that are asked by the participants and creators of the Museum of Random Memory, an ongoing practice-based research project. The project and the work of the project (the creation of the archive and the museum itself) represent a deliberate attempt to directly engage difficult questions of ownership, archive, preservation, and mediation. What does it mean to take ownership of a memory? What can we do with it? What should we do with it? What do we do with it? How do we proceed and where do the lines of the analog and the digital collide with the lines of public, private, hidden and revealed? How do you build (and destroy) a museum in days? What is gained and what is lost?

For this event we, the UnCurators, will perform an iteration of the Museum.
Attendees will be invited to participate by submitting memories and engaging in the intake process.

16:30 – 17:00 – Coffee Break

17:00 – 18:30 Exercise in Radiofonization
Conducted by Diasporas Críticas & Migratory Times/the Institute of (im)Possible Subjects

This workshop is directed at trans-feminist artists, activists and poets with the aim of sharing research around the process of creating a manifesto, enunciation and the practices, histories and metaphors associated with radio, we propose an “exercise in radiofonization”. Part workshop and part performance of a radio recording-studio, this session puts into practice a range of pedagogical and affective techniques in the fields of voice, enunciation and reading.

This space offers an encounter with various enunciation tactics and invites participants to co-produce a performative “exercise in radiofonization”. Depending on the technical capabilities this can be emitted in connection with other online, free or community radios, or recorded for a future transmission. “Exercise in radiofonization” focuses on the transdiscursive and transtemporal conditions of the feminist and decolonial manifesto and how, like the apparatus of radio, it makes a curious incision across the literary, historical, political and artistic; past present and future.

18:30 – 19:30 – Roundtable discussion
With Dalida María Benfield, Anyely Marin Cisneros, Rebecca Close and Annette Markham.

 

BIOS

THE MUSEUM OF RANDOM MEMORY/futuremaking.space

The Museum was first conceived and performed in March 2016 at the CounterPlay Festival held in Aarhus. Over the following year, key participants transformed the ideas into a conceptual framework, which guided the creation of the second instantiation of the museum, presented again at the same festival in March 2017.  The museum is the sum of the efforts of more than a dozen artists, activists, academics, researchers and students working with the Creating Future Memories project at Aarhus University in Denmark. The Creating Future Memories project is one of the projects of the futuremaking.space, a transdisciplinary space for research and public engagement.

 DIASPORAS CRITICAS

Diásporas críticas is an open platform for artistic research. Diásporas críticas research explores and responds to the ways in which nationalisms intervene through micro-process to affect the body and the senses, researching notions of “transmission” and “contagion” in relation to mass media and technology as well as medical discourses and disease. They have received various research and production grants from academic and arts institutions. Throughout 2017 Diasporas criticas are preparing a research project entitled “Contralecturas Tropicales”. They are thinking: climate, cliche, sickness, poetic trope, surrealist dream, melodrama, medical theory, compass, geopolitical sex fantasy, cyclical time and exile.

MIGRATORY TIMES/THE INSTITUTE OF (IM)POSSIBLE SUBJECTS
Migratory Times is a global art, research, and education initiative to facilitate transnational dialogues on displacements and migration. Migratory Times constructs a translocal architecture for overlapping learning, research, and making circles across diverse sites including Bogotá, Colombia; Aarhus and Copenhagen, Denmark; Jeju and Seoul, S. Korea; Manila, Philippines; Barcelona, Spain; and Los Angeles, Salt Lake City, Detroit, and New York City, USA. Over the course of a year, 2016-17, cultural interventions, workshops, and publications are being produced in local sites as well as through virtual networks, using popular education and co-design strategies. Migratory Times is a project of the Institute of (im)Possible Subjects, a transnational feminist art, media and research collective.

 

Free entry.
Required Registration. Send us an email to: [email protected]
http://d-future.net

Contact:
[email protected]
+34 93 326 3470

 

Organized by:

 

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D-Future Project/Mediaccions

 

In collaboration with:

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The Museum of Random Memory

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Migratory Times/the Institute of (im)Possible Subjects

Diasporas Críticas

 

Sponsored by:

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Ministerio de Economía y competitividad de España (Ref. CSO2014-58196-P)

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Museu del Disseny de Barcelona

 

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Estudis d’Art I Humanitats de la Universitat Oberta de Catalunya

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Future Making Research Consortium

Featured image: Diasporascriticas

BEATRIZ SANTIAGO MUÑOZ | Whitney Biennial Film Programs

Previous guest artist Beatriz Santiago Muñoz is screening several of her films at the Whitney 2017 Biennial Film programs on May 6, 2017 at 6pm.

Location: Floor Three, Susan and John Hess Family Gallery and Theater

Beatriz Santiago Muñoz uses an observational style to record performed gestures, creating revealing tableaus of life and locality that examine postcolonial experiences in the Caribbean.

May 6: 6 and 8:30 pm
Screenings

May 7: 3 pm
Screening followed by a conversation with Beatriz Santiago Muñoz and Jan Susler, Civil Rights Attorney, People’s Law Office

Beatriz Santiago Muñoz (b. 1972), Black Beach / Horse / Camp / The Dead / Forces, 2016
La cabeza mató a todos, 2014
Marché Salomon, 2015
Oneiromancer, 2017

To buy tickets click here.

Whitney Museum
of American Art

99 Gansevoort Street
New York, NY 10014
(212) 570-3600

[email protected]

 

Beatriz Santiago Muñoz (b. 1972), still from Marché Salomon, 2015. High-definition video, color, sound; 15:57 min. Courtesy the artist and Galería Agustina Ferreyra, San Juan.

Residency Public Events | 2017

The MFA in Visual Art program would like to invite the community to join us for presentations with our Visiting Artists, as well as student exhibitions, January 28 through February 3.

Graduating Student Exhibition – VCFA Gallery

  • Tuesday, January 31 – Friday, February 3. Hours: 9am-6pm. Gallery may be closed for critiques and reviews as determined by the program.
  • Opening: Monday, January 30, 8-9:30pm, VCFA Gallery

The daily exhibitions are free and open to the public most days. Please be considerate of critique groups and closures as needed for academic purposes.

New and Returning Student Exhibitions – Alumni Hall

  • Sunday, January 29 – Friday, February 3. Hours: 9am-6pm.
  • Opening: Saturday, January 28, 7-8:30pm, Alumni Hall

Gallery may be closed for critiques and reviews as determined by the program.

Visiting Artists Presentations:

Art, Place and Place-making
  • Sunday, January 29, 10:30am to noon,  College Hall Chapel
  • Artist-in-Residence, Mildred Beltré, will discuss her practice.

Mildred BeltreMildred Beltré, is a Brooklyn-based artist, mother, and popular educator working in print, drawing, and participatory politically engaged practice to explore facets of social change. She is interested in exploring political movements and their associated social relations and structures. Her most recent work involves looking at revolutionary theorizing and posturing through a feminist lens.

Beltré’s selected national exhibitions include: International Print Center New York, NYC; Burlington City Arts, Burlington, VT; Five Myles Gallery, Brooklyn, NY; BRIC, Brooklyn, NY; Smack Mellon, Brooklyn, NY; Freedman Gallery, Albright College, Reading, PA; University of Colorado, Boulder, CO; Art in General, NYC ; and international group shows at Projecto Ace, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Hollar Gallery, Prague, Czech Republic; Brun Leglise Gallery, Paris, France; among others.

Her work is included in the Special Collections of the Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY, and the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN, among others.

She has been awarded residencies at the Lower East Side Printshop, the Vermont Studio Center, and the Santa Fe Art Institute. She has received grants from the New York Foundation for the Arts, the Brooklyn Arts Council,  Brooklyn Foundation, and the Rema Hort Foundation, among others.

Beltré is the co-founder of the Brooklyn Hi-Art! Machine, an ongoing socially engaged collaborative art project in Crown Heights, Brooklyn that addresses gentrification and community building through art-making.

Waiting/Welcome
  • Sunday, January 29, 7pm, College Hall Chapel
  • A poetic meditation/reading/screening performed by MFA in Visual Art faculty, Viet Le and Faith Wilding with slides of images of colonial subjects from National Geographic, rephotographed and titled by faculty member, Michelle Dizon. A discussion with the audience follows.
Brooklyn Hi-Art! Machine: Community and Collaboration
  • Wednesday, February 1, 1-2:30pm, Chapel, College Hall
  • Artist-in-Residence, Mildred Beltré, and her collaborator, Visiting Artist Oasa DuVerney, will discuss their collaborative work.

Mildred and OasaThe Brooklyn Hi-Art! Machine is a socially-engaged project started in 2010 by artists Mildred Beltré and Oasa DuVerney. Dubbing ourselves the “Official Unofficial Artists in Residence” of our block, we set up tents, tables, and art supplies on the street outside our apartment building and invited anyone walking by to stop and make art with us. In this way we co-founded the Brooklyn Hi-Art! Machine (BHAM), a collaborative public art intervention that explores art-making as a community-building tool.

Often when a neighborhood is undergoing rapid change, outdoor space is criminalized for some while being preserved for others. One thing that the BHAM seeks to do in its insistence to be outdoors, and particularly on the street, is about claiming the street as a generative space for people of color. Public and collective projects are a way of combating the social isolation that leads to suspicion amongst neighbors as opposed to cooperation. By engaging our neighbors on the street, we facilitate conversation and trust which is often lost when a community undergoes significant transition and upheaval. Our vision is to facilitate a public space for community members—often silenced by socio-economic circumstances—to get informed, feel empowered, create, and organize to take positive action.

As artists it is important to us to not create work solely for the gallery, but also to use our practice to make artwork with and for our community. By creating weavings and art activities on our sidewalks we provide a visible and participatory space for Crown Heights residents of all ages to see and interact with each other. These workshops serve as a creative outlet for our neighbors and provide an opportunity to engage with each other outside of the daily routine and thus encourage a new kind of interaction, one leading to new social relations based on mutual respect and understanding. The fence weavings provide an opening for that conversation amongst neighbors to begin.

Oasa DuVerney is a Brooklyn-based artist and mother, born in Queens, New York. Selected exhibitions include “The View From Nowhere,” Rush Arts Gallery, NYC (2016); “The Window and the Breaking of the Window,” Studio Museum in Harlem, NYC (2016); The Brooklyn Biennial, BRIC, Brooklyn NY (2016), “Crossing the Line,” Mixed Greens Gallery, NYC (2013); “March On!,” Brooklyn Academy Of Music (2013); “Through A Glass Darkly,” Postmasters Gallery, NYC (2012).

DuVerney was awarded the Rush Philanthropic Foundation Artist Residency (2016), Smack Mellon Studio Artist Residency (2014-2015) the LMCC Workspace program residency (2012-2013), Brooklyn Foundation Grant (2016) a grant from the Brooklyn Arts Council (2011), a grant award from the Citizens Committee For New York City (2010, 2013), and the Aljra Emerge Fellowship by the Aljira Center for Contemporary Art (2007).

Media and Publications include The Independent, UK (2016), PIX 11 News (2016), Hyperallergic (2015, 2016), The Guardian, UK (2015), Palestine News Network (2013), The New York Times (2012, 2011), and The New York Daily News (2010). She received her B.F.A. from the Fashion Institute of Technology and her M.F.A. from Hunter College, CUNY.

Visiting Artists/Scholars during the Visual Art residency:

Damali Abrams, Ujju Aggarwal, Eshrat Erfanian, Nils Karsten, Suzy Spence, Rodrigo Valenzuela, and John Willis.