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VCFA MFA Visual Art Program | Open Call For Emerging Artist

The MFA in Visual Art program at Vermont College of Fine Arts is calling for emerging artists to participate in an upcoming online video festival called immigration | imagination.

The video exhibition will be juried by artist, curator, and MFA in Visual Art faculty member Việt Lê with support from VCFA. This is an opportunity for emerging visual artists with or without an MFA to participate in this unique online video festival.

The immigration | imagination exhibition asks artists to share their creative, critical, and community practices in response to the policing of borders and the ongoing vestiges of violence. Read more about the festival and theme on the submission page.

The submission deadline is Friday, December 8, 2017. Submissions must be no longer than six minutes in length. If an artist is submitting an excerpt, the complete piece must be no longer than 15 minutes. Only one submission per artist or collaborative group will be accepted. Submissions are accepted here.

Lê, who will jury the submissions, is a groundbreaking artist whose work has been featured in venues throughout the world. He has also published several books and anthologies. Based in Los Angeles, Lê is an Assistant Professor of Visual Studies at California College of Arts in addition to his faculty position at VCFA.

The immigration | imagination online video festival will debut on VCFA’s MFA in Visual Art program Vimeo page on January 5, 2018 at 4 p.m. Selected applicants also be included in the Pitzer College Art Gallery “Manifesto” exhibition in Southern California, which will take place January 20-March 23, 2018.

For more information on the online video festival, contact Thatiana Oliveira at [email protected] or (802) 828-8636.

Visiting Faculty Member Việt Le Selected for NTU Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore Residency Program

Residency Programme: April 2018–March 2019

NTU Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore
Gillman Barracks
43 Malan Road
Singapore 109443

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NTU Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore (NTU CCA Singapore) is pleased to announce the artists for the 5th cycle of its Residencies Programme (April 2018–March 2019):

Julieta Aranda (Mexico), Izat Arif (Malaysia), Adrián Balesca (Ecuador), Ludovica Carbotta (Italy), Kent Chan (Singapore), Sean Connelly (United States), Daniel Hui (Singapore), Takuji Kogo (Japan), Susanne Kriemann (Germany), Phyoe Kyi (Myanmar), Việt Le (United States), Soyo Lee (South Korea), Lim Sokchanlina (Cambodia), John Low (Singapore), Luca Lum (Singapore), Raafat Majzoub (Lebanon), Falke Pisano (Netherlands), Tan Kai Syng (Singapore), Zai Tang (United Kingdom/Singapore), John Torres (Philippines), Wu Tsang (United States), Susie Wong (Singapore), Wu Mali (Taiwan)

In keeping with NTU CCA Singapore’s holistic approach to the cultural histories and the production of knowledge, the Residencies Programme is distinctly research-oriented and supports artists by granting them a concentrated period of time, a studio, and feedback from in-house curators and international Curators-in-Residence to develop their practice without the pressure of production deadlines. Dedicated to established and emerging artists from Singapore and abroad, this studio-based programme values the open-ended nature of artistic research and embraces multiform expressions of creative enquiry.

Artists-in-Residence receive a studio space and a monthly stipend. The programme also fully funds travel costs and accommodation for foreign artists. To facilitate a dynamic dialogue across different geopolitical contexts and to create an always-diverse community, three studios are reserved for Singapore-based artists, two are dedicated to artists from Asia, and the remaining two are allocated to artists from elsewhere in the world.

Artists are invited to apply for the residency through a nomination process. While in past editions, nominators were international curators, for the 5th cycle, the nominators were exclusively artists. The Centre invited former Artists-in-Residence and established artists from all over the world to put forth the names of their fellows who can most benefit from a research-driven residency in the context of Singapore. This peer-to-peer process furthers the presence of the artists themselves at the core of the Residencies Programme, drawing upon the nominating artists’ generosity, insight, and direct knowledge of the most relevant developments in contemporary art practices.

During their stay, lasting three months for international artists and six months for the Singapore-based artists, Artists-in-Residence become active agents of the Centre’s cultural life through public programmes that range from open studios, artist talks, panel discussions, to screenings and performances.

The final participants in the Residencies Programme were selected by a review panel composed of Ute Meta Bauer (Founding Director, NTU CCA Singapore and Professor, School of Art, Design and Media, NTU), Joselina Cruz (Director, Museum of Contemporary Art and Design, De La Salle College, Manila, Philippines), Low Eng Teong (Assistant Chief Executive, Sector Development Group, National Arts Council, Singapore), Shabbir Hussain Mustafa (Senior Curator, National Gallery Singapore), and Wong Chen-Hsi (Assistant Professor, School of Art, Design and Media, NTU).

Reflecting a wide range of methodologies and critical attitudes, the artists’ proposals were reviewed on the basis of their relevance to Climates. Habitats. Environments, the Centre’s overarching research framework for the next three years (2017–19), and/or their interest to explore issues that address the complexity of cultural and colonial histories of the region as well as global geopolitics. Anna Lovecchio, NTU CCA Singapore Curator, Residencies, states: “Against a culture increasingly veered towards production and exposure, the Residencies Programme is committed to the rather idealistic mission to value the process of artistic research over its product. This kind of residency has a great potential: it can be a retreat, a networking platform, and a sounding board for artists to test their ideas and experiment new directions in the development of their practice.”

Since the programme launched four years ago, it has hosted more than 100 artists, curators, writers, and researchers who have significantly contributed to the Centre’s dynamic environment of experimentation and exchange.

 

For more information about the Residencies Programme, visit www.ntu.ccasingapore.org/residencies/.

The Residencies Programme for Singaporean artists is generously supported by a grant from the National Arts Council, Singapore.

NTU CCA Singapore wishes to thank all those who contributed to our 2016 fundraising auction, the proceeds of which went towards the sustainability of this programme.

 

Located in Gillman Barracks, the NTU Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore (NTU CCA Singapore) is a national research centre of Nanyang Technological University and is supported by a grant from the Economic Development Board. The Centre is unique in its threefold constellation of research and academic programmes, international exhibitions, and residencies, positioning itself as a space for critical discourse and diverse forms of knowledge production. The Centre focuses on Spaces of the Curatorial in Singapore, Southeast Asia, and beyond, as well as engages in multi-layered research topics.

Nanyang Technological University Singapore (NTU) is a research-intensive public university in Singapore with colleges of Engineering, Business, Science, and Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences. NTU is ranked 11th globally and placed 1st amongst the world’s best young universities.

Visiting Faculty Member Việt Lê, Sum of Parts Interview

Excerpt:

Việt Lê is an artist, writer and curator using these creative narratives to tell stories around different forms of trauma: historical, state-imposed, identity-related, and more. Whether in the form of a poem or a curated installation, his work is deeply layered, tinged with loss as well as the beauty of living.

What drives you to wake up in the morning & what keeps you up at night?
I believe we are in a crisis. I don’t believe in the anxious language of refugee “crisis,” although we are globally experiencing mass migrations in the shadow of capital and wars.  In this age of Brexit, xenophobia, gun violence, self-interest and selfies, we are in the depths of a sociopolitical, environmental and spiritual crisis. What wakes me up and keeps me up is the crisis of meaning: how do we facilitate and create meaningful, productive exchanges with our limited world views?  And how do we get ourselves and others to expand the limits of our individual and collective vision?

Trained as an ethnographer, much of my art and research involves collaboration. I worked with many fantastic artists in Hà Nội, including Jamie Maxtone-Graham, my director of photography, as well as conceptual artists Nguyễn Phương Linh, Tuân Mami, Nguyễn Quốc Thành. The dancer is Duy Thanh and you may recognize Phong (the trans M to F protagonist) from the film Finding Phong.
eclipse is about longing and loss—losing a loved one or a country (as I did, as a refugee) and desperately wanting it back, with no recourse.  It is indicative of our current moment, wanting to “make America great again”: we’ve fallen from grace, lost our garden of Eden, there is no way back. On the other hand, it can be about spirituality—wanting to give up everything as a path towards enlightenment, towards ego-lessness—and its blind struggle.

To read full Sum of Parts article, click here.

To read more about Việt, click here and here.

Faculty Member Việt Lê in Queer Horizons | Center for Art and Thought

QUEER HORIZONS

Queer Horizons features the work of Asian American and Asian diasporic artists whose work envisions a queer future that unsettles the past, disrupts the present, and imagines new worlds beyond the limits of the horizon.

We take inspiration from José Esteban Muñoz, the late queer studies scholar, and his conception of a “not yet here.” As he explains in Cruising Utopia, the “not yet here” is a phenomenon of queer futurity that “allows us to see and feel beyond the quagmire of the present.”

Within the last ten years in the US, we have celebrated the legal recognition of same-sex marriage, the end of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” and the formal acceptance of gays in the military, and increased visibility of LGBTQ bodies and personalities in popular culture. In our present moment, however, LGBTQ rights, safety, and health care are increasingly under threat. Simultaneously, the current administration frames Asian American communities as “un-American,” the after tremors along old Yellow Peril fault lines. They are foreign, unassimilable, undocumented: Muslim “terrorists,” hordes of H1B visa techie taking over American jobs, or “model minority” students taking up too much space in classrooms.

However, the artists and works in Queer Horizons name a possibility beyond the “model minority”: as queer Asian American artists, they disrupt the model minority narrative defined by heteronormative notions of success. Each artist engages a non-linear temporality moving between pasts, presents, and futures, and each work gestures towards a queer history that we, as Queer Asian Americans, can excavate, (re)create, and (re)produce in our pasts, presents, and futures. For example, Greyson Hong’s Costco photos, Việt Lê’s productions of club scenes/ online performances, and Tina Takemoto’s unconventional short film all tell of an alternative past to inform a queer alternative future. As we think of these experiences at the intersections with undocumented status, foreignness, and Islamophobia, their highly experimental and queer aesthetic in storytelling suggests further radical potential.

It is in this dangerous political climate that the artists in Queer Horizons insist on claiming liminal and hybrid spaces and lives, queer collectivity, and intersectional solidarity. Embracing failure, misbehavior, non-normativity, and defiant joyfulness thus becomes a radical form of resistance. This is the kind of utopian horizon that we call forward. In the spirit of artist Jeffrey Augustine Songco’s video, “Let’s Dance America!”

Queer Horizons appears in conjunction with the publication of Laura Kina and Jan Christian Bernabe’s book, Queering Contemporary Asian American Art (University of Washington Press, 2017).

Curated by Jan Christian Bernabe and Laura Kina

Curatorial Assistant: Mads Le

Contributors: Anida Yoeu Ali, Sita Kuratomi Bhaumik, Kim Anno, Wafaa Bilal, Greyson Hong, Kiam Marcelo Junio, Việt Lê, Maya Mackrandilal, Zavé Martohardjono, Jeffrey Augustine Songco, Tina Takemoto, and Saya Woolfalk.

Contributors’ works are published in staggered waves from late-June to late-July 2017, after which the whole exhibition are archived permanently on CA+T’s website.

Special thanks to the Andy Warhol Foundation and the California Institute of Contemporary Arts for fiscal support.