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Alumnus David French @ The Oakman

Alumnus David French, ’10, will participate in The Art Project at the Oakman in Jersey City, Friday, September 8th, from 6-8pm.

For more information on David’s work, click here.

Northeast Alumni Exhibition @ Atlantic Works Gallery

Here and There

Saturday October 14 – Friday October 27th

“[Places] give us continuity, something to return to, and offer a familiarity that allows some portion of our own lives to remain connected and coherent.”

Rebecca Solnit, The Faraway Nearby

Vermont College of Fine Arts offers a low-residency MFA in Visual Art program, and so students of the program inevitably end up thinking about place and what it means. The program is here (Montpelier, Vermont) and it is there (wherever students live and work). Threads from across the country and sometimes globe meet in Montpelier and connect students, teachers and alumni. In Here and There, thirteen alumni of the program offer their interpretations of place and what it means to them. In addition to attending VCFA, Renee Lauzon, Muriel Angelil, Heather Park, Chip Rutan, Sumru Tekin, Kim Darling, Valerie Hird, Sabrina Fadial, Brian Zeigler, Samantha Eckert, Wendy Powell, Maggie Nowinski and Leah Grimaldi have lived or currently live and work in New England.

Saturday, October 14th  6:00-9:00 pm Opening Reception,

Thursday, October 19th 6:00-9:00 pm Third Thursday Reception and Artist Talk

Gallery Hours 2:00-6:00 pm Fridays and Saturdays

Atlantic Works Gallery 80 Border Street, East Boston

Featured image: Renée d. Lauzon, “The Pink Underbelly of Home Wants A Scratch,” inkjet print on canvas on paper, 8 x 8, 2017. Courtesy of the artist.

Alumnus Nicolas Gadbois ’09 @ Todd Weiner Gallery

Left Behind, an exhibition at Todd Weiner Gallery

9/1/17-930/17

115 W 18th St Kansas City, MO 64108 United States

An exhibition of surreal oil paintings featuring blank signs and billboards set in eerie landscapes. The work examines the way shifting realities in commerce and industry impact small towns in America. The blank signs are a signifier for empty consumerism.

Former Faculty Member Sowon Kwon @ Full Haus

Sowon Kwon
coffee table comma books
September 2 – December 3

Opening Saturday September 2nd
3-6pm

 

Through sculptural and video installations, digital animation, drawing, printmaking, and artist books, Sowon Kwon has employed translation as both artistic medium and the subject of critique in her art since the early 1990s. Kwon’s formative early work From the Land of Porcelain, 1993, turns James McNeill Whistler’s Peacock Room, 1876-77, into a series of reliefs. This piece offers a literal shallowness of depth to correspond to the symbolic flatness of Whistler’s design, influenced by fantasies of Asia. The installation was included in The New Museum’s 1993 exhibition Trade Routes, which, like the more-studied 1993 Whitney Biennial, addressed cultural identity in the face of globalization. However, identity politics is about much more than cultural exchange—It is about the negotiation of the self.

The exhibition coffee table comma books includes work from across Kwon’s career and is conceived, in the artist’s words, as “a small registry of various associative couplings: then and now, writing and making, homophones and namesakes (샘 and Sam), the domicile and the workplace, the literal and the figurative, the private/personal and the public/historical.”

Kwon’s 1994 relief sculpture Coffee Table and Escritoire (after Godwin), presented here at Full Haus for the first time since its inclusion in The Queens Museum’s 1994 exhibition Live-Work, depicts an anamorphic interior space furnished with a writing desk and side table designed by Edward William Godwin, a nineteenth-century designer whose “Anglo-Japanese” style influenced the Arts and Crafts movement. The relief sculpture destabilizes the style and its underlying projections of the East by translating it into spatial terms that require viewers to move to a set position in order to see the image without distortion. Installed at Full Haus, the sculpture returns furniture to the gallery, acknowledging the space’s domestic interior.

Language plays an important role in Kwon’s practice, and in addition to her historical relief sculpture, coffee table comma books includes two of Kwon’s artist books. Her 2010 dongghab takes its title from the Korean concept of a social relationship between people of the same age. In 1963—the year of Kwon’s birth—Ed Ruscha published Twentysix Gasoline Stations and Sylvia Plath committed suicide by gas in her home. Taking this convergence as a departure point, dongghab explores an alternative form of self portraiture. Kwon’s 2017 book S as in Samsam, co-published by Secretary Press and Triple Canopy, also employs arbitrary similarity: a homophone between a Korean honorific for teacher and the ubiquitous English name Sam.

Kwon’s most recent work, Fiction, 2017, depicts a comma adorned with fake eyelashes. Of all punctuation marks, the comma is the most likely to be forgotten—with the possible exception of its twin, the apostrophe. The comma helps to locate the terms on either side, which could stand for an ideal practice of negotiating the self. As Kwon writes: “To a break in verse or a shift in pitch, like caesuras. In music, where a caesura is noted, metrical time is not counted…. Yes, to all that.”

***

Sowon Kwon (b. 1963 Seoul, Korea) has had solo exhibitions at The Kitchen in New York City, Matrix Gallery/University of CA Berkeley Art Museum, and the Whitney Museum of American Art at Philip Morris. Her work has also been featured in numerous group exhibitions including at The New Museum, The ICA Boston, MOCA Los Angeles, The Queens Museum, The Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco, Artist Space, The Drawing Center, Artsonje Center in Seoul, Korea, the Gwangju Biennale, the Yokohama Triennale in Japan, and San Art in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. She is a recipient of fellowships from The New York Foundation for the Arts in Sculpture, The Wexner Center for the Arts in Media Arts, and The Asian Cultural Council. She holds a BA from UC Berkeley, an MFA from Pratt, and attended the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program in 1991. She currently teaches in the Graduate Fine Arts Program at Parsons The New School in New York City.​

2042 Griffith Park Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90039

Faculty Member Suné Woods @ Kathleen O. Ellis Gallery

Suné Woods: To Sleep With Terra

Light Work is pleased to present the work of photo-collage and video artist Suné Woods, To Sleep With Terra. This will be Woods’ first solo exhibition with Light Work since her residency here in 2016. The exhibition will be on view in the Kathleen O. Ellis Gallery at Light Work from August 28―October 19, 2017, with an opening reception with the artist on Wednesday, September 13, from 5-6pm.

As part of the opening reception, we invite gallery patrons to a special presentation at 6pm. Infused with wordplay, found imagery, sound and moving images in multimedia form by Woods, award-winning poet Fred Moten, and Syracuse University Professor and musicologist James Gordon Williams. Titled You are mine. I see now, I’m a have to let you go, this collaboration was generously supported by Syracuse University’s Humanities Center and is part of the 2017-18 Syracuse Symposium: Belonging. Both events are free, open to the public, and offer refreshments.

Urban Video Project (UVP) will feature Suné Woods’ video work, A Feeling Like Chaos, concurrently with When a Heart Scatter, Scatter, Scatter in the Everson’s Robineau Gallery and To Sleep with Terra at Light Work. Woods says that A Feeling Like Chaos “attempts to make sense of a continuum of disaster, toxicity, fear, and a political system that sanctions violence towards its citizens.” This installation will be on view on the Everson Museum’s north facade September 14―23 and October 5―28, 2017, from dusk until 11:00 p.m. Find more information at urbanvideoproject.com.

Los Angeles-based artist Suné Woods creates multi-channel video installations, photographs, sculpture, and collage. Her practice examines absences and vulnerabilities within cultural and social histories. She also uses microcosmal sites such as the family to understand the larger sociological phenomenon, imperialist mechanisms, and formations of knowledge. She is interested in how language is emotively expressed, guarded and translated through the absence and presence of the physical body.

To Sleep With Terra includes photo-collage and works on paper that explore Wood’s ongoing interest in creating her own topographies, gleaned from science, travel, and geographic magazines and books of the past fifty years. The collage work explores the social phenomena that indoctrinate brutality and the ways in which propaganda and exploitation have employed photography.

Woods has said of her artistic journey, “Collage seemed the best way for me to articulate all the complicated sensations that were arising for me while processing these streamed documentations of violence, ecology, and a desire to understand more deeply how seemingly disparate things relate when they are mashed up in a visual conversation.”

Suné Woods has participated in residencies at Headlands Center for the Arts, Vermont Studio Center, The Center for Photography at Woodstock, and Light Work. Woods has received awards from the Visions from the New California Initiative, as well as The John Gutmann Fellowship Award, and The Baum Award for an Emerging American Photographer. She has exhibited her work at the Brooklyn Museum of Art, The Lowe Art Museum, Miami, and The San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery. She received her MFA from California College of the Arts in 2010 and is currently Visiting Faculty at Vermont College of Fine Art.

 

Faculty Member Cauleen Smith @ Gallery TPW

Jérôme Havre, Cauleen Smith, and Camille Turner

Triangle Trade

September 14–November 11, 2017
Opening Reception: Thursday, September 14, 7:00–9:00 pm

Gallery TPW is thrilled to announce an upcoming exhibition featuring Jérôme Havre, Cauleen Smith, and Camille Turner, a new commission made possible with the generous support of Partners in Art. Created during a year of cross-border conversation on their specific relationships to land and belonging, Havre, Smith, and Turner have collaborated on a new short film that will premiere at TPW. The film features three puppet avatars—performing the selves of Havre, Smith, and Turner—navigating distinct worlds that at once isolate them and offer them the possibility of transformative connection. As they move through their respective landscapes, Havre, Smith, and Turner’s puppets reflect on blackness as a state of becoming, a mode of experience that reaches simultaneously into multiple futures and histories. The film is accompanied by a new multi-channel CCTV video installation developed by Smith that creates feedback loops of seeing and being seen amid an immersive environment.

Alongside the project, Toronto-based writer Yaniya Lee joins Gallery TPW as a guest curator of public programs for the course of the exhibition. Lee will engage local Black artists and thinkers as a parallel to the ongoing conversations that have prompted Havre, Smith, and Turner’s work.

In addition to the vital support of Partners in Art, this exhibition is made possible with the assistance of the Liaison of Independent Filmmakers of Toronto (LIFT).

Biographies

Jérôme Havre’s practice concentrates on issues of identity, communities, and territories, investigating the political and sociological processes of contemporary life as they relate to nationalism in France and Canada. Havre adopts a multidisciplinary approach in his exploration of these themes and their attending questions; he uses myriad tools and methods to make tangible the conditions of identity within situations of social transformation. Havre completed his studies at l’École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts (Paris). Since 2001, he has exhibited in Europe, Africa, and North America. Recent shows include “Talking Back, Otherwise,” Jackman Humanities Institute, University of Toronto; “Paradis: La fabrique de l’image,” espace d’art contemporain 14°N 61°W, Martinique; “Land Marks,” Art Gallery of Peterborough, Ontario; “Liminal (Necessity and accident),” The Robert McLaughlin Gallery, Oshawa, ON; “Reiteration,” Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto;  and “Poetry of Geopolitics,” Koffler Gallery, Toronto. He is represented by Galerie Donald Browne (Montréal) and is currently based in Toronto.

Cauleen Smith is an interdisciplinary artist whose work reflects upon the everyday possibilities of the imagination. Operating in multiple materials and arenas, Smith roots her work firmly within the discourse of mid-twentieth-century experimental film. Drawing from structuralism, third-world cinema, and science fiction, she makes things that deploy the tactics of these disciplines while offering a phenomenological experience for spectators and participants. Smith was born in Riverside, California and grew up in Sacramento. She earned a BA in Creative Arts from San Francisco State University and an MFA from the University of California, Los Angeles School of Theater, Film, and Television. Smith is currently based in Chicago; she will join the faculty of the studio-art program of California Institute of the Arts in January 2018. Her films, objects, and installations have been featured in group exhibitions at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; the Studio Museum in Harlem; the Contemporary Art Museum Houston; the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts; the New Museum, New York; D21, Leipzig; and Decad, Berlin. She has presented solo exhibitions of her films, drawings, and installations at the Center for Contemporary Art and Culture, Portland, Oregon; the Contemporary Arts Center, UC Irvine; the Art Institute of Chicago; The Kitchen, New York; the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago; and Threewalls, Chicago. Smith is the recipient of several grants and awards, including the Rockefeller Media Arts Award, a Creative Capital Film/Video grant, a Chicago 3Arts Grant, a the Foundation for Contemporary Arts grant, the Artadia Award, and a Rauschenberg Residency. Smith was a 2016 Recipient of a Herb Alpert Awards in the Arts in Film and Video and is the inaugural recipient of the Ellsworth Kelly Award. She was a Whitney Biennial 2017 participant and currently has a solo show at The Art Institute of Chicago. Smith is represented by Corbett vs. Dempsey, Chicago, and Kate Werble, New York.

Born in Jamaica and based in Toronto, Camille Turner is an explorer of race, space, home, and belonging. She is the founder of Outerregion, an afrofuturist performance company. Her interventions, installations, and public engagements combine Afrofuturism and historical research and have been presented throughout Canada and internationally, including at Dak’Art African Contemporary Art Biennale, Dakar Senegal, and the Bamako Biennale in Mali. Miss Canadiana, one of her earliest performance works, challenges perceptions of Canadianness and troubles the unspoken binary of “real Canadian” and “diverse other.” Camille’s most recent works include Wanted, a collaboration with Camal Pirbhai that uses the trope of fashion to transform an archive of newspaper posts by Canadian slave owners into a series of contemporary fashion ads. Her collaboration with Cheryl L’Hirondelle on LandMarks2017, commissioned by Parks Canada and Partners In Art, resulted in Freedom Tours, an alternative Thousand Islands boat tour and a procession honouring Mother Earth at Rouge National Park. Camille has taught at the University of Toronto, Algoma University, and the Toronto School of Art. She is a graduate of Ontario College of Art and Design and York University’s Masters in Environmental Studies program, where she is currently a PhD candidate. Her work has recently been included in More Caught in the Act, edited by Johanna Householder and Tanya Mars, Looking Beyond Borderlines: North America’s Frontier Imagination by Lee Rodney, and Border Cultures by Srimoyee Mitra and Bonnie Devine. camilleturner.com.

Yaniya Lee’s interdisciplinary research draws on the work of Black Studies scholars to question critical reading practices and reconsider Black art histories in Canada. From 2012-2015 she hosted the Art Talks MTL podcast, a series of long-form interviews with art workers in Montreal. In 2016 she programmed “Labour, Land and Body: geographies of de/colonialism” for Vtape’s Curatorial Incubator. Last fall, with members of the 4:3 Collective, she organized the MICE Symposium on Transformative Justice in the Arts. Lee was previously on the editorial advisory committees for C Magazine and FUSE Magazine. She is a founding collective member of MICE Magazine and a new member of the EMILIA-AMALIA working group. This summer, Lee participated in the Banff Research in Culture: Year 2067 residency. She is the 2017-2018 writer-in-residence at Gallery 44 and currently works as the associate editor at Canadian Art Magazine.

170 St Helens Ave Toronto, ON M6H 4A1  |  VISIT  |  T: 416.645.1066  |  [email protected]  |  HOURS: Tues to Sat, 12pm – 5pm

Current Student Kevin Gilmore Now Represented by Matre Gallery, Atlanta

Current student Kevin Gilmore is now represented by Matre Gallery in Atlanta, Georgia. His work will be included in the 22nd Anniversary show.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 25, 2017 • 7 – 9 P.M.

and/or

SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 2017 • 7 – 9 P.M.

Established in 1995, Matre Gallery is the home base for Rob Matre’s dual career as gallery owner and artist/photographer.  The gallery features work by local and national artists that make an immediate impact, connecting the viewer to subjects that resonate. The focus is on figurative and representational paintings, drawings, photography and mixed media works.

The gallery recently moved from Miami Circle to a 4,000 square foot space in Buckhead at 2300 Peachtree Road.

Matre Gallery
2300 Peachtree Road
Atlanta, GA 30309
404.458.2733

Featured image: Summer Nearly Gone, 50″ x 50″, Acrylic and collage on canvas

Alumni Yukiyo Kawano Interviewed

A visual artist and a choreographer come together for an Aug. 9 performance work that bears witness to the annihilation of two entire cities and the complex Japanese and American narratives therein.

A scene from a prior performance of "Suspended Moment".

A scene from a prior performance of “Suspended Moment”.

Courtesy of Yukiyo Kawano

Seventy-two years ago, American pilots dropped atomic bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. To this day, historians debate whether, as the U.S. maintained, the bombings were necessary to end World War II in the Pacific Theater, or whether, as some critics hold, they constituted war crimes.

Visual artist Yukiyo Kawano and choreographer Meshi Chavez are the creators of “Suspended Moment,” a multidisciplinary performance work they developed with composer Lisa DeGrace and poet Allison Cobb.

Kawano is from Hiroshima; Chavez grew up in Albuquerque — close enough to the Manhattan Project to have a feel for the American side of this history. They’ve performed this work in places with strong ties to atomic history, like Los Alamos, New Mexico, the Hanford Site, and are now bringing it to Portland for a fifth incarnation.

Chavez’s practice is based in the Japanese performance style butoh. You may have seen it performed by dancers in white makeup, moving with infinitesimal slowness. But Chavez’s style is something more kinetic and stately. In some sequences, he puts himself through organic contortions, twisting and spinning almost out of control. Others are direct references to everyday activities on either side of the Pacific.

Here are some highlights of the conversation.

 

Current Student Kate Donnelly @ New City Galerie

New City Galerie in Burlington, VT hosts a group exhibition with current MFA Visual Art student Kate Donnelly through October 24th.

Interpose will feature works by five artists, including Donnelly’s performance art and handmade costumes.

New City Galerie

132 Church Street

Burlington, VT 05401

Visiting Artist Michel Droge | New Work at Frank Brockman Gallery

Frank Brockman Gallery in Brunswick, Maine will show new prints by continuing visiting artist, Michel Droge from August 11-26, 2017. Hiraeth opens Friday, August 11, 5-8pm.

Michel Droge is a painter and printmaker who lives and works in Portland, Maine. Her work is research based and deals directly with Climate Change, Maine’s island Communities and  local conservation efforts. She has worked with the Island Institute,Gulf of Maine Research Institute and the Audubon Society on collaborative projects.

Her most recent work is inspired by sublime encounters in nature and environmental research, finding poetry and meaning in scientific and material realities- a post anthropocene imagined. Larger series of works are named after tomes that are  musical, literary and poetic (see Requiem, Nocturnes, Aubades and Sappho’s Ghosts) – thus invoking the importance of the influence of music, literature and poetry in her work.

Michel received her BA from Oberlin College and her MFA from Maine College of Art. After graduating from Oberlin she worked as a printmaker for Styria Studios in New York City. Her awards include grants from the Joan Mitchell Foundation and the Maine Arts Commission. She has been a resident at the Saltonstall Foundation in Ithaca, NY and a member of the Olive Branch/Ink Shop.

Michel’s work has been included in the exhibitions Other Landscapes: Michel Droge and Michael Shaunnessey at Gould Academy (2015), the Joan Mitchell Foundation Award Recipients Exhibition at the Cue Art Foundation in NY,NY (2011) and Boston University’s Young Contemporaries (2011).

Michel’s Solo Exhibitions include Nocturne’s : Recent paintings and prints by Michel Droge at University of Maine in  Farmington (2016) and Tiny Catastrophe’s: Considering the unseen climate change at June Fitzpatrick Gallery (2015) and Presently, Michel is a Visiting Professor at Maine College of Art and maintains her studio at the Bakery Studios (thebakerystudios.org) in Portland, Maine.

Frank Brockman Gallery

68 Maine Street, 2nd Floor

Brunswick, Maine