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Winter 2018 MFA in Visual Art graduates!

 

VCFA MFA Visual Art Program | Open Call For Emerging Artist

The MFA in Visual Art program at Vermont College of Fine Arts is calling for emerging artists to participate in an upcoming online video festival called immigration | imagination.

The video exhibition will be juried by artist, curator, and MFA in Visual Art faculty member Việt Lê with support from VCFA. This is an opportunity for emerging visual artists with or without an MFA to participate in this unique online video festival.

The immigration | imagination exhibition asks artists to share their creative, critical, and community practices in response to the policing of borders and the ongoing vestiges of violence. Read more about the festival and theme on the submission page.

The submission deadline is Friday, December 8, 2017. Submissions must be no longer than six minutes in length. If an artist is submitting an excerpt, the complete piece must be no longer than 15 minutes. Only one submission per artist or collaborative group will be accepted. Submissions are accepted here.

Lê, who will jury the submissions, is a groundbreaking artist whose work has been featured in venues throughout the world. He has also published several books and anthologies. Based in Los Angeles, Lê is an Assistant Professor of Visual Studies at California College of Arts in addition to his faculty position at VCFA.

The immigration | imagination online video festival will debut on VCFA’s MFA in Visual Art program Vimeo page on January 5, 2018 at 4 p.m. Selected applicants also be included in the Pitzer College Art Gallery “Manifesto” exhibition in Southern California, which will take place January 20-March 23, 2018.

For more information on the online video festival, contact Thatiana Oliveira at [email protected] or (802) 828-8636.

Visiting Faculty Member Việt Le Selected for NTU Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore Residency Program

Residency Programme: April 2018–March 2019

NTU Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore
Gillman Barracks
43 Malan Road
Singapore 109443

T +65 6460 0300
[email protected]

ntu.ccasingapore.org
Facebook / Instagram / Twitter

NTU Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore (NTU CCA Singapore) is pleased to announce the artists for the 5th cycle of its Residencies Programme (April 2018–March 2019):

Julieta Aranda (Mexico), Izat Arif (Malaysia), Adrián Balesca (Ecuador), Ludovica Carbotta (Italy), Kent Chan (Singapore), Sean Connelly (United States), Daniel Hui (Singapore), Takuji Kogo (Japan), Susanne Kriemann (Germany), Phyoe Kyi (Myanmar), Việt Le (United States), Soyo Lee (South Korea), Lim Sokchanlina (Cambodia), John Low (Singapore), Luca Lum (Singapore), Raafat Majzoub (Lebanon), Falke Pisano (Netherlands), Tan Kai Syng (Singapore), Zai Tang (United Kingdom/Singapore), John Torres (Philippines), Wu Tsang (United States), Susie Wong (Singapore), Wu Mali (Taiwan)

In keeping with NTU CCA Singapore’s holistic approach to the cultural histories and the production of knowledge, the Residencies Programme is distinctly research-oriented and supports artists by granting them a concentrated period of time, a studio, and feedback from in-house curators and international Curators-in-Residence to develop their practice without the pressure of production deadlines. Dedicated to established and emerging artists from Singapore and abroad, this studio-based programme values the open-ended nature of artistic research and embraces multiform expressions of creative enquiry.

Artists-in-Residence receive a studio space and a monthly stipend. The programme also fully funds travel costs and accommodation for foreign artists. To facilitate a dynamic dialogue across different geopolitical contexts and to create an always-diverse community, three studios are reserved for Singapore-based artists, two are dedicated to artists from Asia, and the remaining two are allocated to artists from elsewhere in the world.

Artists are invited to apply for the residency through a nomination process. While in past editions, nominators were international curators, for the 5th cycle, the nominators were exclusively artists. The Centre invited former Artists-in-Residence and established artists from all over the world to put forth the names of their fellows who can most benefit from a research-driven residency in the context of Singapore. This peer-to-peer process furthers the presence of the artists themselves at the core of the Residencies Programme, drawing upon the nominating artists’ generosity, insight, and direct knowledge of the most relevant developments in contemporary art practices.

During their stay, lasting three months for international artists and six months for the Singapore-based artists, Artists-in-Residence become active agents of the Centre’s cultural life through public programmes that range from open studios, artist talks, panel discussions, to screenings and performances.

The final participants in the Residencies Programme were selected by a review panel composed of Ute Meta Bauer (Founding Director, NTU CCA Singapore and Professor, School of Art, Design and Media, NTU), Joselina Cruz (Director, Museum of Contemporary Art and Design, De La Salle College, Manila, Philippines), Low Eng Teong (Assistant Chief Executive, Sector Development Group, National Arts Council, Singapore), Shabbir Hussain Mustafa (Senior Curator, National Gallery Singapore), and Wong Chen-Hsi (Assistant Professor, School of Art, Design and Media, NTU).

Reflecting a wide range of methodologies and critical attitudes, the artists’ proposals were reviewed on the basis of their relevance to Climates. Habitats. Environments, the Centre’s overarching research framework for the next three years (2017–19), and/or their interest to explore issues that address the complexity of cultural and colonial histories of the region as well as global geopolitics. Anna Lovecchio, NTU CCA Singapore Curator, Residencies, states: “Against a culture increasingly veered towards production and exposure, the Residencies Programme is committed to the rather idealistic mission to value the process of artistic research over its product. This kind of residency has a great potential: it can be a retreat, a networking platform, and a sounding board for artists to test their ideas and experiment new directions in the development of their practice.”

Since the programme launched four years ago, it has hosted more than 100 artists, curators, writers, and researchers who have significantly contributed to the Centre’s dynamic environment of experimentation and exchange.

 

For more information about the Residencies Programme, visit www.ntu.ccasingapore.org/residencies/.

The Residencies Programme for Singaporean artists is generously supported by a grant from the National Arts Council, Singapore.

NTU CCA Singapore wishes to thank all those who contributed to our 2016 fundraising auction, the proceeds of which went towards the sustainability of this programme.

 

Located in Gillman Barracks, the NTU Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore (NTU CCA Singapore) is a national research centre of Nanyang Technological University and is supported by a grant from the Economic Development Board. The Centre is unique in its threefold constellation of research and academic programmes, international exhibitions, and residencies, positioning itself as a space for critical discourse and diverse forms of knowledge production. The Centre focuses on Spaces of the Curatorial in Singapore, Southeast Asia, and beyond, as well as engages in multi-layered research topics.

Nanyang Technological University Singapore (NTU) is a research-intensive public university in Singapore with colleges of Engineering, Business, Science, and Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences. NTU is ranked 11th globally and placed 1st amongst the world’s best young universities.

Current Student Kevin Gilmore Now Represented by Matre Gallery, Atlanta

Current student Kevin Gilmore is now represented by Matre Gallery in Atlanta, Georgia. His work will be included in the 22nd Anniversary show.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 25, 2017 • 7 – 9 P.M.

and/or

SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 2017 • 7 – 9 P.M.

Established in 1995, Matre Gallery is the home base for Rob Matre’s dual career as gallery owner and artist/photographer.  The gallery features work by local and national artists that make an immediate impact, connecting the viewer to subjects that resonate. The focus is on figurative and representational paintings, drawings, photography and mixed media works.

The gallery recently moved from Miami Circle to a 4,000 square foot space in Buckhead at 2300 Peachtree Road.

Matre Gallery
2300 Peachtree Road
Atlanta, GA 30309
404.458.2733

Featured image: Summer Nearly Gone, 50″ x 50″, Acrylic and collage on canvas

Visiting Artist Michel Droge Reviewed in Portland Phoenix

Since she first appeared as a student in MECA’s Graduate Studies painting program, I’ve been a huge fan of Michel Droge’s work. Her thick, hazy, metallicseeming paintings held both darkness and light as well as anyone in the state (not named Dozier Bell). But “Hiraeth,” her shortstay exhibition of cyanotypes and embossings, Droge takes a leftturn into a different medium and intention.

In an artist statement, Droge defines “hiraeth,” a Welsh term, as “a homesickness for a home to which you cannot return, a home which maybe never was; the nostalgia, the yearning, the grief for lost pieces of your past.” A year prior to when she began the work that would end up in this exhibition, Droge’s brother died of an opiate overdose. “Everything familiar had come undone. I was navigated uncharted waters,” she writes. “I began a series of prints based on the idea of unraveling an Aran sweater.”

Those prints are included here, as well as numerous cyanotypes and several pieces that seem to serve as a stand-in for the sweater itself.

Haunting and apparitional, Droge’s work in Hiraeth is vibrantly nostalgic. With a primary color palette of white and aqua, the show conveys a nautical theme, the images vaguely recalling fisherman’s maps and navigational charts. Droge and her brother grew up sailing on the water. They’d spend summers on Block Island.

Droge came to study at MECA in 2009, and as she recalls it, kept to herself about the heavier themes of the past year that had been informing her work. She says that even as she was making the embossings and occasionally showing them in town, she’d never really talked about the work’s connection to her brother. “I would just talk really vaguely about the universal feeling of being lost at sea.”

Years later, Droge made cyanotypes working with the same themes and materials, a set of stick chart drawings she says “helped navigate emotional and unconscious waters.” A photographic printing process that ammonium iron citrate and potassium ferricyanide, cyanotype prints emerge a cyan-blue hue, squarely in the register of marine aesthetics. Relative to other methods of printing, the image tends to fade when exposed to the basic elements.

Printed, the crudely formed stick charts took on constellatory patterns, and she combined them with the sweaters and embossings for a three-pronged exploration of what the artist describes as the unconscious emotional realm she’s navigated since her brother’s passing.

Droge wonders if the story behind this work overshadows its universality, but her exhibition at the airy, well-lit Frank Brockman Gallery in Brunswick, is simple and inviting. Frayed ends of the cable-knit sweater appear in the cyanotype “Shoals” as the distant shores of land masses, with narrow isthmuses curling off the frame. In “Prophecy,” we see the white form and outline of the sweater as though its arms are raised up in surrender. In the cyanotype “Thief,” the sweater-sleeve imprint conjoins with a bed of stars imprinted from the stick charts.

As an educator who encourages young artists to engage with the coastline and its various storylines, from the effects of climate change on working life to the drug problem in coastal communities, Droge’s exhibit here is without question the most personal we’ve seen from her. It’s harrowing stuff, even with its macabre themes soundly sublimated into an art medium, the cyanotype, that could otherwise be described as angelic. Viewers would enjoy it even without knowing the whole story, its universality is indeed strong. But for those who might grapple with the work in particular terms, it’s as lifeaffirming as it gets.


Hiraeth, works on paper by Michel Droge | Through Aug 31 | At the Frank Brockman Gallery, 68 Maine St, Brunswick

Featured image: PROPHECY, cyanotype by Michel Droge

BEATRIZ SANTIAGO MUÑOZ | Whitney Biennial Film Programs

Previous guest artist Beatriz Santiago Muñoz is screening several of her films at the Whitney 2017 Biennial Film programs on May 6, 2017 at 6pm.

Location: Floor Three, Susan and John Hess Family Gallery and Theater

Beatriz Santiago Muñoz uses an observational style to record performed gestures, creating revealing tableaus of life and locality that examine postcolonial experiences in the Caribbean.

May 6: 6 and 8:30 pm
Screenings

May 7: 3 pm
Screening followed by a conversation with Beatriz Santiago Muñoz and Jan Susler, Civil Rights Attorney, People’s Law Office

Beatriz Santiago Muñoz (b. 1972), Black Beach / Horse / Camp / The Dead / Forces, 2016
La cabeza mató a todos, 2014
Marché Salomon, 2015
Oneiromancer, 2017

To buy tickets click here.

Whitney Museum
of American Art

99 Gansevoort Street
New York, NY 10014
(212) 570-3600

[email protected]

 

Beatriz Santiago Muñoz (b. 1972), still from Marché Salomon, 2015. High-definition video, color, sound; 15:57 min. Courtesy the artist and Galería Agustina Ferreyra, San Juan.

Winter 2017 Grads

ADP170131_6099

Holly Britt

ADP170131_6153

Simone Spruce-Torres

ADP170131_6244

Lillie Grace

ADP170201_6263

Vicki Knipp

ADP170201_6343

Lori Victor

ADP170201_6384

Guy Coffin

ADP170201_6405

Jon Chapman

ADP170202_6541

Moksha Sommer

ADP170202_6637

Luann Bice

Residency Public Events | 2017

The MFA in Visual Art program would like to invite the community to join us for presentations with our Visiting Artists, as well as student exhibitions, January 28 through February 3.

Graduating Student Exhibition – VCFA Gallery

  • Tuesday, January 31 – Friday, February 3. Hours: 9am-6pm. Gallery may be closed for critiques and reviews as determined by the program.
  • Opening: Monday, January 30, 8-9:30pm, VCFA Gallery

The daily exhibitions are free and open to the public most days. Please be considerate of critique groups and closures as needed for academic purposes.

New and Returning Student Exhibitions – Alumni Hall

  • Sunday, January 29 – Friday, February 3. Hours: 9am-6pm.
  • Opening: Saturday, January 28, 7-8:30pm, Alumni Hall

Gallery may be closed for critiques and reviews as determined by the program.

Visiting Artists Presentations:

Art, Place and Place-making
  • Sunday, January 29, 10:30am to noon,  College Hall Chapel
  • Artist-in-Residence, Mildred Beltré, will discuss her practice.

Mildred BeltreMildred Beltré, is a Brooklyn-based artist, mother, and popular educator working in print, drawing, and participatory politically engaged practice to explore facets of social change. She is interested in exploring political movements and their associated social relations and structures. Her most recent work involves looking at revolutionary theorizing and posturing through a feminist lens.

Beltré’s selected national exhibitions include: International Print Center New York, NYC; Burlington City Arts, Burlington, VT; Five Myles Gallery, Brooklyn, NY; BRIC, Brooklyn, NY; Smack Mellon, Brooklyn, NY; Freedman Gallery, Albright College, Reading, PA; University of Colorado, Boulder, CO; Art in General, NYC ; and international group shows at Projecto Ace, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Hollar Gallery, Prague, Czech Republic; Brun Leglise Gallery, Paris, France; among others.

Her work is included in the Special Collections of the Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY, and the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN, among others.

She has been awarded residencies at the Lower East Side Printshop, the Vermont Studio Center, and the Santa Fe Art Institute. She has received grants from the New York Foundation for the Arts, the Brooklyn Arts Council,  Brooklyn Foundation, and the Rema Hort Foundation, among others.

Beltré is the co-founder of the Brooklyn Hi-Art! Machine, an ongoing socially engaged collaborative art project in Crown Heights, Brooklyn that addresses gentrification and community building through art-making.

Waiting/Welcome
  • Sunday, January 29, 7pm, College Hall Chapel
  • A poetic meditation/reading/screening performed by MFA in Visual Art faculty, Viet Le and Faith Wilding with slides of images of colonial subjects from National Geographic, rephotographed and titled by faculty member, Michelle Dizon. A discussion with the audience follows.
Brooklyn Hi-Art! Machine: Community and Collaboration
  • Wednesday, February 1, 1-2:30pm, Chapel, College Hall
  • Artist-in-Residence, Mildred Beltré, and her collaborator, Visiting Artist Oasa DuVerney, will discuss their collaborative work.

Mildred and OasaThe Brooklyn Hi-Art! Machine is a socially-engaged project started in 2010 by artists Mildred Beltré and Oasa DuVerney. Dubbing ourselves the “Official Unofficial Artists in Residence” of our block, we set up tents, tables, and art supplies on the street outside our apartment building and invited anyone walking by to stop and make art with us. In this way we co-founded the Brooklyn Hi-Art! Machine (BHAM), a collaborative public art intervention that explores art-making as a community-building tool.

Often when a neighborhood is undergoing rapid change, outdoor space is criminalized for some while being preserved for others. One thing that the BHAM seeks to do in its insistence to be outdoors, and particularly on the street, is about claiming the street as a generative space for people of color. Public and collective projects are a way of combating the social isolation that leads to suspicion amongst neighbors as opposed to cooperation. By engaging our neighbors on the street, we facilitate conversation and trust which is often lost when a community undergoes significant transition and upheaval. Our vision is to facilitate a public space for community members—often silenced by socio-economic circumstances—to get informed, feel empowered, create, and organize to take positive action.

As artists it is important to us to not create work solely for the gallery, but also to use our practice to make artwork with and for our community. By creating weavings and art activities on our sidewalks we provide a visible and participatory space for Crown Heights residents of all ages to see and interact with each other. These workshops serve as a creative outlet for our neighbors and provide an opportunity to engage with each other outside of the daily routine and thus encourage a new kind of interaction, one leading to new social relations based on mutual respect and understanding. The fence weavings provide an opening for that conversation amongst neighbors to begin.

Oasa DuVerney is a Brooklyn-based artist and mother, born in Queens, New York. Selected exhibitions include “The View From Nowhere,” Rush Arts Gallery, NYC (2016); “The Window and the Breaking of the Window,” Studio Museum in Harlem, NYC (2016); The Brooklyn Biennial, BRIC, Brooklyn NY (2016), “Crossing the Line,” Mixed Greens Gallery, NYC (2013); “March On!,” Brooklyn Academy Of Music (2013); “Through A Glass Darkly,” Postmasters Gallery, NYC (2012).

DuVerney was awarded the Rush Philanthropic Foundation Artist Residency (2016), Smack Mellon Studio Artist Residency (2014-2015) the LMCC Workspace program residency (2012-2013), Brooklyn Foundation Grant (2016) a grant from the Brooklyn Arts Council (2011), a grant award from the Citizens Committee For New York City (2010, 2013), and the Aljra Emerge Fellowship by the Aljira Center for Contemporary Art (2007).

Media and Publications include The Independent, UK (2016), PIX 11 News (2016), Hyperallergic (2015, 2016), The Guardian, UK (2015), Palestine News Network (2013), The New York Times (2012, 2011), and The New York Daily News (2010). She received her B.F.A. from the Fashion Institute of Technology and her M.F.A. from Hunter College, CUNY.

Visiting Artists/Scholars during the Visual Art residency:

Damali Abrams, Ujju Aggarwal, Eshrat Erfanian, Nils Karsten, Suzy Spence, Rodrigo Valenzuela, and John Willis.

Summer 2016 Grads

Patrick DeGuira

Patrick DeGuira

Ruth Moon

Ruth Moon

Katie Richardson

Katie Richardson

David Kutz

David Kutz

Andrea Beck

Andrea Beck

Judith Brisson

Judith Brisson

Lana Taliaferro

Lana Taliaferro

Karen Louise Spears

Karen Louise Spears

Nikki Juen

Nikki Juen

Veronica Cross

Veronica Cross