M/othering @ Gallery 263 | C0-Curated By Alumna Tereza Swanda

“M/othering” at Gallery 263, Cambridge, MA
Curated by: Tereza Swanda and Angela Rose Voulgarelis
Featuring work by: Fletcher Boote, Maya Pindyck, Tereza Swanda, Angela Rose Voulgarelis
On View: Thursday January 5 – Saturday February 4, 2017
Gallery Hours: W-Sat, 12-7pm/ Su, event dependent
Saturday January 14; Reception: 6-8pm, Artist Talk:, 8-9pm
Embroidery Circle: Saturday January 21, 11am-1pm

Gallery 263 is pleased to present M/othering, a Curatorial Proposal Series exhibition that features recent works by Fletcher Boote, Maya Pindyck, Tereza Swanda, and Angela Rose Voulgarelis. These four artists draw on their experiences of motherhood and childhood in relation to the often-complicated dynamics of family relationships, cultural identity, and positions of privilege. They explore these themes through a range of media, driven by questions about inheritance and systems; What continuity is there, if any, between generations? What gets handed down from mother to child? What gets passed from nation to education, or from education to family structure? What images and stereotypes of mothering tend to spread and reproduce?

All four artists featured in M/othering have attended art workshops for the past twenty years led by South African artists Rose Shakinovsky and Claire Gavronsky, which encourage reflection on the interconnectivity of social, cultural, and familial experiences. Each artist in this exhibition considers the far-reaching impacts and political implications of everyday notions of “othering” and “mothering” in connection to their own lives.

In her audio series “Like Night and Day,” Fletcher Boote explores nuances of domesticity and family through various arrangements of sounds. Recordings from her daily life with young children are the backdrop for compositions which point to the impact of repetition, give relevancy to the unexceptional, and question a hierarchy that qualifies music as one thing and “noise” as an “other.”

In the series “Out of Lezley”, Maya Pindyck’s gouache portraits are an elegy to the black lives lost to police brutality in the United States. Working from a media photograph of Lezley McSpadden taken after her son Mike Brown was killed, she renders visible multiple faces that blend source material, medium, and collective grief.

Tereza Swanda works with themes of erasure and recognition. In “Spot Light,” embedded portraits of victims of police brutality are slowly revealed as participants wash their hands. Illuminated with light and color, Swanda preserves and displays these cracked, painful images.

In her paintings and performance-based work, Angela Rose Voulgarelis re-contextualizes notions of “women’s work”. Her paintings are an exploration of the figure in relation to the context of the everyday. In the ongoing project, “Airing Dirty Laundry”, Voulgarelis prompts participation with beginnings of phrases such as “Don’t Be Too…”, or “Not Enough….”, asking visitors to complete the phrase in writing. Voulgarelis then embroiders the responses in public spaces, inviting conversation and exchange.

 263 Pearl St, Cambridge, MA

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Alumna Renée Lauzon @ Core Gallery | Seattle

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For more information about the Core Gallery, click here.

For more information about Renee’s work, click here.

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Alumna Judy Walgreen and Faculty Member Michelle Dizon Receive Art Matters Grant

Art Matters announces 2016 grantees

Art Matters is pleased to announce the recipients of its 2016 grants to individual artists. The foundation awarded 26 grants of 5,000 and 10,000 USD for projects and ongoing work that breaks ground aesthetically and socially.

In addition to grants to individuals, Art Matters made a special grant to Lower Manhattan Cultural Council for Michael Richards: Winged, an exhibition of work by Richards, a 1995 grantee, who died tragically in his LMCC studio in the World Trade Center on 9/11.

In announcing the grants, Art Matters Director Sacha Yanow said, “We are thrilled to support this extraordinary group of artists from across the U.S. Their practices are diverse, engaging issues of social justice and experimenting with form. We feel their voices are particularly important at this moment in the world, and through our funding we hope to help amplify them.”

2016 Grantees:

Sandra Haydee Alonso (El Paso, TX)
Wearable sculptural works that question borders, identity, and relationships.

Katrina Andry (New Orleans, LA)
Ongoing printmaking work involving vignettes that challenge racial stereotyping.

Sadie Barnette (Oakland, CA)
Work based on the FBI files and COINTELPRO’s surveillance of the artist’s father and his activities with the Black Panthers.

Black Salt Collective 
(Oakland/Los Angeles, CA)
Ongoing performance and archiving work of this Black, Brown and Indigenous women artist collective.

Frank Chi (Washington DC)
New short film that remixes imagery from the women’s suffrage movement.

Complex Movements (Detroit, MI)
Ongoing multi-media performance and installation work engaging community-led social justice movements in Detroit and beyond.

Michelle Dizon (Los Angeles, CA)
The Archive’s Fold, an artist’s book that explores the politics of archives.

Skylar Fein (New Orleans, LA)
Ongoing work with Parisite, a community-based New Orleans skate park, and the youth who built it.

FORCE: Upsetting Rape Culture (Baltimore, MD)
Nuestra Tierra, Mi Cuerpo, a Monument Quilt display at the US/Mexico border in collaboration with La Casa Mandarina and Latinx survivors of rape and abuse.

Vanessa German (Pittsburgh, PA)
Museum of Resilience, a neighborhood art place centered around the global interconnectedness and power of human beings.

Harriet’s Apothecary (Brooklyn NY)
Ongoing work of this healing justice collective led by Black cis women, queer and trans healers, health professionals, artists and ancestors.

Taro Hattori (Richmond, CA)
Rolling Counterpoint, a mobile teahouse providing a platform for discussions around inequities within local communities.

Xandra Ibarra (Oakland, CA)
New performance about corporeal inhabitation, racialized skin and concealment in the age of surveillance.

Jellyfish Colectivo y Los Dos 
(El Paso, TX)
Collaborative traveling street art initiative along the US/Mexico border.

Amos Paul Kennedy Jr. (Detroit, MI)
Ongoing poster printing for concerts at Historically Black Colleges and Universities in the USA.

Young Joon Kwak (Los Angeles, CA)
New body of work involving trans performance objects.

Troy Michie (Brooklyn, NY)
Travel to El Paso towards the development of multi-disciplinary works inspired by the Zoot suit.

Holly Nordlum (Anchorage, AK)
Tupik Mi, a film and community based project dedicated to the revitalization of traditional tattooing amongst Inuit women.

Ahamefule Oluo (Seattle, WA)
Development of SUSAN, a theatrical performance about the artist’s mother.

Laura Ortman (Brooklyn, NY)
Ongoing work involving the recording and collection of sounds, songs, stories and voices of Native Americans in New York City.

Otabenga Jones and Associates (Houston, TX)
Creation of an education and activity packet for the youth of Houston’s historic Third Ward neighborhood.

Sondra Perry (Perth Amboy, NJ)
Video work involving the NCAA’s use of the artist’s twin brother’s likeness.

Dario Robleto (Houston, TX)
A body of work centered around the history of the heartbeat.

Tina Takemoto (San Francisco, CA)
The third in a trilogy of experimental films about queer Japanese life during American wartime imprisonment.

Rodrigo Valenzuela 
(Los Angeles, CA/Seattle, WA)
Video work about unpaid labor, volunteering, and internship culture.

Judith Walgren (San Francisco, CA)
Photographic and video work towards an alternate curriculum challenging existing K-5th grade California Mission studies.

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Cauleen Smith Mousse Magazine Interview

Destroying Narratives: Cauleen Smith

Cauleen Smith and Carolyn Lazard in Conversation

Cauleen Smith is an interdisciplinary artist operating with multiple materials and modes, including installation environments, referencing mid-20th-century experimental film. She draws from devices originating in science fiction to deploy a conversation with the representation of black women in Western cinema as radical others, and to address the dislocated relationship with ideas of belonging to a “homeland.”

CAROLYN LAZARD: Over the past few years, you’ve created more and more installation work and pieces that expand outside of a traditional cinema environment. There seems to be this never-ending debate about the contested presence of cinema in the gallery space. Can you address these formal changes in your work and why you necessarily wanted to take your work out of the theater?

CAULEEN SMITH: When I first started making films, showing moving images in gallery and museum spaces was both prohibitively expensive and technically difficult. It was actually painful to have my work in art shows because the exhibition decisions were so disrespectful to the medium and the way the work was intended to be viewed. Digital video has changed that. A good projector is affordable and requires no human projectionist for operation. An extremely high-quality piece of media can loop effortlessly on a media player. Furthermore, there are the natural similarities between installation art and filmmaking: the completeness, the immersiveness, the totality of materials and playing with their materiality is, to me, echoed in each form. The installation becomes a container, a wrapper, for the films, and sometimes a physical echo of things occurring in the films. It also becomes a three-dimensional footnote in a sense because I rely on the environment in which my films play to expand and illuminate the content, tone, and forms deployed in the films. By building chambers, what I have taken to calling “space stations,” I have a chance to control the spectator’s approach toward the work and influence their receptivity. Frequently the installation is a playful obstruction. A way of slowing down the spectator, of inviting them to spend more time with the work by offering them information that can only be gleaned by being inside of the space that contains the film.

CL: In H-E-L-L-O (2014) and in The Way Out Is The Way Two: Fourteen Short Films about Chicago and Sun Ra (2012), you work directly with musicians, addressing the legacy of black music and the avant-garde. Your use of non-diegetic sound, dubbed dialogue, and text in lieu of voice can be quite disorienting. The dissonance between sound and image points to worlds outside of the frame, adding layers of perception. Often, one senses that there is an entirely separate sonic narrative unfolding under your films. Could you address your relationship to sound as a filmmaker?

CS: I admit to the strangeness of something your questions alludes to, which is the fact that I really do favor dissonant, non-diegetic sound design. I get excited when the sound I hear disagrees with the image I see but somehow manages to point me toward a new question or possibility. Whenever a spectator is offered drama through dialogue, they desire the satisfaction—the seduction—of losing themselves in the affective transference that occurs between screen character and individual spectator. Dialogue is a very special kind of text, different from essay, poetry, or expository voice-over. I love what it can do, but I don’t love enabling that traditional desire for illusionistic filmmaking in my spectators when I am trying to offer them a different kind of viewing experience. In the context of my work, it’s misleading to invite viewers to lose themselves in the narrative drama, when all of the tension actually resides in the image and its formal relationship to what comes before and after and what sounds support or undermine those images. Rather than completely mute the figures in my films, I prefer to untether the voice from the body and insert some slippage. In that space, I hope, is the potential for a kind of recognition of self, that invites more than desire. Cognitive estrangement and cognitive dissonance are both tactics that I rely on quite heavily. What does it feel like to live in a body that is perceived as malevolently vacant, fugitive, unknowable, and black? Estrangement and dissonance are two psychological states that come to mind when I think about how black people have to move through the world and the assumptions we are sometimes subjected to. Undermining the mundane aspects of moving through cinematic space by peppering the sonic environment with alien information seems like an invitation to contemplate the discomfort—and that freedom.

To read full interview click here.

Featured image:

Cauleen Smith, Song for Earth and Folk (still), 2013
Courtesy: the artistaffiliate link trace | adidas

Alumna Michelle Hagewood | Henry Art Gallery Seattle

Vermont College of Fine Arts alumna Michelle Hagewood is the assistant curator of school, youth, and family programs at Henry Art Gallery in Seattle, WA. Recently she was interviewed by the Seattle Times.

Here is an excerpt:

Assistant curator gets to combine three of her favorite things: working with youth, exploring art and designing activities around the museum experience.

How did you get started in that field? Not long after receiving a Bachelor of Fine Arts from the Maryland Institute College of Art, I picked up a weekend job helping out with family programs at the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore. There I was introduced to the field of museum education and was hooked. I had found a job that combined three of my favorite things: working with youth, exploring art and designing activities that allowed people to respond and make creations inspired by their museum experience. Since then, I’ve followed this line of work in various ways at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and now the Henry!

What’s a typical day like? My favorite thing about working in museum education is that every day is completely different. Depending on the day I might meet a new artist, catch up on the newest learning theory or create a fantastical landscape alongside 5-year-olds and their families. Lately, I’ve been spending a lot of time with an awesome group of young people, the members of the Henry Teen Art Collective, who meet with me every week to create new projects and programs for the Henry.

To read the entire interview click here.

To learn more about the Henry Art Gallery click here.

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MFA-V Alumna Carissa Burkett Performs @ Disjecta

Liminal’s immersive opera update of Fassbinder’s 1972 black comedy for the stage.

Audiences are invited to wander through a Fassbinder fantasia as Liminal combines performance art, video, and opera into a unique, immersive experience, a hybrid of theatre and gallery installation, of live performance and video.

In this (literally) biting social satire, Phoebe Zeitgeist is an alien agent sent to Earth to investigate human democracy in action. Unfortunately, Phoebe has a problem—she knows our language, but can’t figure out US. Then the vampires show up.

TRIGGER WARNINGS: substance abuse, sexuality, semiotics, societal complacency, firearms, fetishes, structuralism, choking, privileged classes behaving badly, suicide, Hegel.

Purchase tickets here.

Featuring
Carissa Burkett (soprano) as Phoebe Zeitgeist
With Linda Austin, Evan Corcoran, Carla Grant, Wayne Haythorn, Eleanor Johnson, Don Kern, Alex Reagan, Danielle RossTodd Van Voris

Written by Rainer Werner Fassbinder
Translated by Denis Calandra
Direction and Media Design by John Berendzen
Developed by John Berendzen, Evan Corcoran and the ensemble
Original music by John Berendzen and Carissa Burkett
Costume by Faerin Millington and Manot VonRocket
Crew Jared LeeSharon Porter, Nancy Novotny

Featuring Fassbinder zines by Going Place

Disjecta Contemporary Art Center, 8371 N Interstate Ave, Portland, OR 97217url clone | 『アディダス』に分類された記事一覧

MFA-V Alumna L. Mylott Manning Exhibition NYC

At Columbia University in the Center for Theoretical Physics, 8th Fl, 116th St & Broadway, NYC.

MetaMoi (P)ARTY 2, Oct 22, 2016 – February 10, 2017, Open to the public Monday – Friday 9 am – 10 am.

Curated by Eva Depoorter. Artists included: Sonia Aniceto, Colleen Blackard, Miriam Carothers, Benjamin W. Coleman, Julia Dubovyk, Maho Kino Fei Li, L. Mylott Manning, Ellie Perendy, Erin Starr

Please follow this link for directions:
http://outreach.astro.columbia.edu/directions/

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MFA-V Alumna Mary Ting Curates Endangered! NYC

ENDANGERED!

Curated by Mary Ting

November 16 to February 3, 2017

 

ENDANGERED! the exhibition and its related programming is an emergency call to save the imperiled creatures whose precarious state is completely human caused. The endangered species crisis is growing at an alarming rate due to wildlife trafficking for animal parts and the exotic pet trade; habitat loss, degradation and conflicts due to the mining, logging, drilling, dams, agriculture, and livestock grazing, and further exacerbated by climate change. Wildlife trafficking with its direct ties to criminal syndicates and weapons threatens the rule of law, social stability and global security. This crisis is not just about the animals and regional problems – this involves all of us.

ENDANGERED! will include photography, prints and sculpture by a group of acclaimed international artists who are dedicated to the cause. From Nick Brandt’s heartbreaking Across the Ravaged Land series, to the expressionistic protest prints of Sue Coe, the exhaustive Photo Ark by Joel Sartore, the last photographs of Cecil, the famed lion, by his researcher and photographer, Brent Stapelkampf, to the Ivory Buddhist deity pieces by Mary Ting, these artists are emphatic about the critical nature of these issues.

The exhibition ENDANGERED! and its public programs are co-sponsored by the John Jay College Sustainability and Environmental Justice program. sustainabilityjjay.org

For more information and additional upcoming public programs: endangeredexhibition.blogspot.com

Gallery Hours: 9- 5 PM, M – F, or by appointment
Location: 6th Floor Haaren Hall, John Jay College, 899 Tenth Avenue, NY, NY, 10019

For more information please contact:

The Anya and Andrew Shiva Gallery John Jay College
860 11th Avenue
New York, NY 10019 [email protected] 212-237-1439 www.shivagallery.org

About John Jay College of Criminal Justice: An international leader in educating for justice, John Jay College of Criminal Justice of The City University of New York offers a rich liberal arts and professional studies curriculum to upwards of 15,000 undergraduate and graduate students from more than 135 nations. In teaching, scholarship and research, the College approaches justice as an applied art and science in service to society and as an ongoing conversation about fundamental human desires for fairness, equality and the rule of law. For more information, visit www.jjay.cuny.edu.

 

Image: ©Nick Brandt, Ranger with Tusks of Killed Elephant, Amboseli, 2011 Courtesy of the artist and Edwynn Houk Gallery, New York and Zurich

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Alumnus David Kutz @ Soho Photo Gallery

VCFA MFA Visual Art alumnus David Kutz has an upcoming exhibition at the Soho Photo Gallery in NYC. Retro opens Tuesday 12/6/2016 at 6-8pm. 

About the show:

“Although the photographs of RETRO were shot in many different places around the world, they are unified by a focus on composition, color, form, line and texture. Looking at them, I wonder about the commonality of the built environment across cultures. Is it the way I see the world, or a result of globalization?”

 

Soho Photo Gallery

15 White St New York, NY 10013 United States

 

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Co-Chair Dont Rhine | Discussed in Savage Minds Article

We’re in Crisis! Time to Slow Down: Discernment in a Trumpian Age

(This occasional post comes from Edgar Rivera Colón, Ph.D. Dr. Rivera Colón is a medical anthropologist and teaches at Columbia University’s Narrative Medicine program. Dr. Rivera Colón is also Assistant Professor of Sociology and Urban Studies at Saint Peter’s University, The Jesuit University of New Jersey. He does spiritual direction with activists as a ministry of the Ecumenical Catholic Church (ECC), an LGBT-affirming faith community, based in Guadalajara, Mexico.)

No hay mal que dure cien años — ni cuerpo que lo resista.” (Popular Puerto Rican saying).

“There is no evil that can last a century — nor bodies equipped to endure it.”

The last weeks have been a marathon (Trumpathon?) of despair, grief, resistance, and mobilization in the wake of Donald Trump’s election victory. I’ve spent part of time having long conversations with younger activists — folks in their 20’s and 30’s — about their feelings of disorientation and anger at what seemed to many to be an impossible electoral outcome. One of most dangerous, hate-spewing, fear-mongering, and vulgar presidential candidates in the US history is about to take over one wing of the state apparatus. Whatever one’s take on the whys and wherefores of the 2016 presidential election results, the negative effect on many bodies, spirits, and minds is palpable and worrying. What to do in such a crisis with so many layers and consequences that could warp even further the American polity for two or three generations hence?

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