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BEATRIZ SANTIAGO MUÑOZ | Whitney Biennial Film Programs

Previous guest artist Beatriz Santiago Muñoz is screening several of her films at the Whitney 2017 Biennial Film programs on May 6, 2017 at 6pm.

Location: Floor Three, Susan and John Hess Family Gallery and Theater

Beatriz Santiago Muñoz uses an observational style to record performed gestures, creating revealing tableaus of life and locality that examine postcolonial experiences in the Caribbean.

May 6: 6 and 8:30 pm
Screenings

May 7: 3 pm
Screening followed by a conversation with Beatriz Santiago Muñoz and Jan Susler, Civil Rights Attorney, People’s Law Office

Beatriz Santiago Muñoz (b. 1972), Black Beach / Horse / Camp / The Dead / Forces, 2016
La cabeza mató a todos, 2014
Marché Salomon, 2015
Oneiromancer, 2017

To buy tickets click here.

Whitney Museum
of American Art

99 Gansevoort Street
New York, NY 10014
(212) 570-3600

[email protected]

 

Beatriz Santiago Muñoz (b. 1972), still from Marché Salomon, 2015. High-definition video, color, sound; 15:57 min. Courtesy the artist and Galería Agustina Ferreyra, San Juan.

Cauleen Smith & Beatriz Santiago Muñoz | Whitney Biennial Film Program

Faculty member Cauleen Smith and past visiting artist Beatriz Santiago Muñoz will screen films during Whitney Biennial Film program.

For ten consecutive weekends, the Biennial film program will present new moving image works in the Susan and John Hess Family Theater. At once radical and quiet, global and intimate, the selected works explore subjective and affective experiences of the contemporary political and social moment. Reflecting on the urgent themes seen in the exhibition, the film program features some of the most exciting voices working in moving image today.

The film program is organized by Christopher Y. Lew, Mia Locks, and Aily Nash.

Program details and schedule here.

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Artist-Teacher AK Burns @ New Museum | NYC

A.K. Burns
Shabby but Thriving
January 18–April 23, 2017

New Museum
235 Bowery
New York, NY 10002
USA

www.newmuseum.org

In the exhibition and residency Shabby but Thriving, A.K. Burns continues a serial work that draws on theater, science fiction, philosophy, and ecological anxieties. The project is organized around five elements: power (the sun), water, land, void, and body.

In Shabby but Thriving, commissioned by and premiering at the New Museum as part of the Department of Education and Public Engagement’s R&D Season: BODY, Burns presents the project’s next chapter, a two-channel video staged within an installation that explores the subjugation and agency of various bodies. A video, titled Living Room (2017–ongoing), is the installation’s central work; it was filmed in the New Museum’s 231 Bowery space, a prewar building adjacent to the Museum that houses the artist-in-residence studio. Moving from its basement through the stairwells (partially renovated and often bearing relics of previous eras) and into a series of found and constructed interiors, the video treats the entire building as both a stage and a metaphorical body. The building exists as a hermetic ecosystem and protagonist in the narrative of Living Room, as performers use their bodies to labor and leisure, choreograph and dialogue, bathe and subsist within this vital architectural interior. Likewise, furniture and props act as both benign objects and political subjects.

The installation includes sculptural objects that augment and animate the video’s narrative: a stripped and gutted couch outfitted with underglow, cast bags of dirt embedded with foil candies, a carpet soiled during the couch demolition, and fishing lures and lines stretched across walls.

The exhibition is curated by Johanna Burton, Keith Haring Director and Curator of Education and Public Engagement, and Sara O’Keeffe, Assistant Curator.

Public programs

Body Politic: From Rights to Resistance
Sunday, February 5, 11:30am–6:30pm

This event features information sessions with lawyers, activists, and grassroots organizers on issues centered around the body: civil disobedience, protest, healthcare, policing, prisons, immigration, and environmental contamination. Each session will focus on resource sharing and modes of resistance, and will include presentations followed by discussion with the audience. Participants include staff from Callen-Lorde Community Health Center, the Center for Constitutional Rights, the Center for Reproductive Rights, the New York Civil Liberties Union, the New York Environmental Law and Justice Project, and the Sylvia Rivera Law Project.

The Question of Quantum Feminism
Thursday, March 9, 7pm

This roundtable discussion brings together artists exploring the evolving and expansive topic of quantum feminism, and considers how an understanding of bodies as sensory systems can be a starting point for discussions around ethics and “entangled relations of difference.” Panelists include A.K. Burns, Harry Dodge, Carolyn Lazard, Anicka Yi, and Constantina Zavitsanos.

Listening Party: Poetry and Record Release for Leave No Trace
Thursday, April 20, 7pm

In celebration of A.K. Burns’ Leave No Trace (2016) this record release party includes performances and readings by artists and writers including Justin Allen, Fia Backström, CAConrad, Katherine Hubbard, and Juliana Huxtable. Leave No Trace is an experimental audio project released as a limited edition vinyl with an accompanying poem. The recording consists of two full length LP tracks that combine ambient environmental recordings, vocalization, sounds generated from various materials, and an old electric guitar. The title references wilderness ethics, pointing to questions around unregulated spaces, bodies and actions that go unrecorded, and what is natural or naturalized.

Support for A.K. Burns: Shabby but Thriving

About New Museum
The New Museum is the only museum in New York City exclusively devoted to contemporary art. Founded in 1977, the New Museum is a center for exhibitions, information, and documentation about living artists from around the world. From its beginnings as a one-room office on Hudson Street to the inauguration of its first freestanding building on the Bowery designed by SANAA in 2007, the New Museum continues to be a place of experimentation and a hub of new art and new ideas.

Featured Image:

A.K. Burns, Living Room (production still), 2017–ongoing. Two-channel HD video, color, sound, 36 minutes. Courtesy the artist and Callicoon Fine Arts. Photo: Eden Batki.

Cauleen Smith Mousse Magazine Interview

Destroying Narratives: Cauleen Smith

Cauleen Smith and Carolyn Lazard in Conversation

Cauleen Smith is an interdisciplinary artist operating with multiple materials and modes, including installation environments, referencing mid-20th-century experimental film. She draws from devices originating in science fiction to deploy a conversation with the representation of black women in Western cinema as radical others, and to address the dislocated relationship with ideas of belonging to a “homeland.”

CAROLYN LAZARD: Over the past few years, you’ve created more and more installation work and pieces that expand outside of a traditional cinema environment. There seems to be this never-ending debate about the contested presence of cinema in the gallery space. Can you address these formal changes in your work and why you necessarily wanted to take your work out of the theater?

CAULEEN SMITH: When I first started making films, showing moving images in gallery and museum spaces was both prohibitively expensive and technically difficult. It was actually painful to have my work in art shows because the exhibition decisions were so disrespectful to the medium and the way the work was intended to be viewed. Digital video has changed that. A good projector is affordable and requires no human projectionist for operation. An extremely high-quality piece of media can loop effortlessly on a media player. Furthermore, there are the natural similarities between installation art and filmmaking: the completeness, the immersiveness, the totality of materials and playing with their materiality is, to me, echoed in each form. The installation becomes a container, a wrapper, for the films, and sometimes a physical echo of things occurring in the films. It also becomes a three-dimensional footnote in a sense because I rely on the environment in which my films play to expand and illuminate the content, tone, and forms deployed in the films. By building chambers, what I have taken to calling “space stations,” I have a chance to control the spectator’s approach toward the work and influence their receptivity. Frequently the installation is a playful obstruction. A way of slowing down the spectator, of inviting them to spend more time with the work by offering them information that can only be gleaned by being inside of the space that contains the film.

CL: In H-E-L-L-O (2014) and in The Way Out Is The Way Two: Fourteen Short Films about Chicago and Sun Ra (2012), you work directly with musicians, addressing the legacy of black music and the avant-garde. Your use of non-diegetic sound, dubbed dialogue, and text in lieu of voice can be quite disorienting. The dissonance between sound and image points to worlds outside of the frame, adding layers of perception. Often, one senses that there is an entirely separate sonic narrative unfolding under your films. Could you address your relationship to sound as a filmmaker?

CS: I admit to the strangeness of something your questions alludes to, which is the fact that I really do favor dissonant, non-diegetic sound design. I get excited when the sound I hear disagrees with the image I see but somehow manages to point me toward a new question or possibility. Whenever a spectator is offered drama through dialogue, they desire the satisfaction—the seduction—of losing themselves in the affective transference that occurs between screen character and individual spectator. Dialogue is a very special kind of text, different from essay, poetry, or expository voice-over. I love what it can do, but I don’t love enabling that traditional desire for illusionistic filmmaking in my spectators when I am trying to offer them a different kind of viewing experience. In the context of my work, it’s misleading to invite viewers to lose themselves in the narrative drama, when all of the tension actually resides in the image and its formal relationship to what comes before and after and what sounds support or undermine those images. Rather than completely mute the figures in my films, I prefer to untether the voice from the body and insert some slippage. In that space, I hope, is the potential for a kind of recognition of self, that invites more than desire. Cognitive estrangement and cognitive dissonance are both tactics that I rely on quite heavily. What does it feel like to live in a body that is perceived as malevolently vacant, fugitive, unknowable, and black? Estrangement and dissonance are two psychological states that come to mind when I think about how black people have to move through the world and the assumptions we are sometimes subjected to. Undermining the mundane aspects of moving through cinematic space by peppering the sonic environment with alien information seems like an invitation to contemplate the discomfort—and that freedom.

To read full interview click here.

Featured image:

Cauleen Smith, Song for Earth and Folk (still), 2013
Courtesy: the artist

MFA-V Alumna Kathy Couch | Performance|Portrait @ Invisible Dog Art Center

PERFORMANCE| PORTRAIT by A CANARY TORSI – Invisible Dog presents a canary torsi’s new responsive video installation, Performance | Portrait. The work invites each visitor to an encounter with a performer. Grounded in questions of intimacy and connection within the performance experience, four distinguished performers were recorded maintaining their focus on a future audience.

LEAD COLLABORATORS
Yanira Castro (Concept/Choreographer), Kathy Couch (Installation Artist), Stephan Moore (Interaction Designer), Julie Wyman (Filmmaker)

PERFORMER COLLABORATORS
Anna Azrieli, Leslie Cuyjet, Peter Schmitz, David Thomson

This exhibition is part of Intermediaries, a 2016 program co-commissioned and presented by the Invisible Dog and Immediate Medium and funded by the New York State Council on the Arts.

Commissioning support for Performance I Portrait also provided by the Catherine Tell Foundation and Creative Art Council at Brown University, as a part of The Conference for Research on Choreographic Interfaces (CRCI). Performance I Portrait is sponsored, in part, by the Greater New York Arts Development Fund of the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, administered by Brooklyn Arts Council (BAC). It was developed, in part, during a BRIClab Residency at BRIC House in Brooklyn, NY, a residency with producing partner High Concept Labs in Chicago, and with residency support from Gibney Dance Center and ISSUE Project Room in New York and Amherst College in MA. Additional support provided by UC Davis, CA.

Opening Reception: Saturday December 3, from 6 to 10pm
On viewing from Monday to Saturday from 12pm to 7pm, Sunday from 12pm to 5pm

Part of WONDERLAND, annual group exhibition at The Invisible Dog.

Performance and Installation 2016

Summer 2015 Grads

Nate Burgos

Nate Burgos (photo credit: Martin Castaneda)

Lori Grinker

Lori Grinker (photo credit: Martin Castaneda)

Shari Pratt

Shari Pratt (photo credit: Martin Castaneda)

Tara Sasiadek

Tara Sasiadek (photo credit: Martin Castaneda)

John Gibson

John Gibson (photo credit: Martin Castaneda)

Robby Gilbert

Robby Gilbert (photo credit: Martin Castaneda)

David Joron

David Joron (photo credit: Martin Castaneda)

Denise Hoover

Denise Hoover (photo credit: Martin Castaneda)

Ruby De La Fuente

Ruby De La Fuente (photo credit: Martin Castaneda)

Erica Lynn

Erica Lynn (photo credit: Martin Castaneda)

Paula Imirzian

Paula Imirzian (photo credit: Martin Castaneda)

Chip Rutan

Chip Rutan

Nancy Deleary

Nancy Delray (photo credit: Martin Castaneda)

Summer 2014 Grads

Aaron Rose

Aaron Rose

Ruth Dudley-Carr

Ruth Dudley-Carr

Naomi Elena Ramirez

Naomi Elena Ramirez

Mary Telfer

Mary Telfer

Mark Read

Mark Read

Margery Theroux

Margery Theroux

Lorraine Reynolds

Lorraine Reynolds

Lisa Crafts

Lisa Crafts

Kristin Serafini

Kristin Serafini

Kimberly Marshall

Kimberly Marshall

Julia Dixon

Julia Dixon

Joseph Keenan

Joseph Keenan

Douglas Brull

Douglas Brull

Bob McCann

Bob McCann

Andrea Taylor

Andrea Taylor

Summer 2013 Grads

Paul Tonnes

Paul Tonnes

Rick Morgan

Rick Morgan

Liz Winter

Liz Winter

Robyn Duff

Robyn Duff

Carrie Ramig

Carrie Ramig

Joe Rivera

Joe Rivera

Carol Wylie

Carol Wylie

Jeff Marley

Jeff Marley

Lisa Beerle

Lisa Beerle

Jessica Halliday

Jessica Halliday

Elaina Kennedy

Elaina Kennedy

Samantha Perrelli

Samantha Perrelli

Christie Herbert

Christie Herbert

Ken Horne

Ken Horne

John Auciello

John Auciello

Winter 2013 Grads

Beth Gilmore

Beth Gilmore

Todd Leisek

Todd Leisek

Thais Mather

Thais Mather

Michael Ruiz

Michael Ruiz

Jon McAuliffe

Jon McAuliffe

Janelle O'Rourke

Janelle O’Rourke

Jim Rivera

Jim Rivera

Colin McFee

Colin McFee

Chris Faust

Chris Faust