Posts

Faculty Member Suné Woods @ Kathleen O. Ellis Gallery

Suné Woods: To Sleep With Terra

Light Work is pleased to present the work of photo-collage and video artist Suné Woods, To Sleep With Terra. This will be Woods’ first solo exhibition with Light Work since her residency here in 2016. The exhibition will be on view in the Kathleen O. Ellis Gallery at Light Work from August 28―October 19, 2017, with an opening reception with the artist on Wednesday, September 13, from 5-6pm.

As part of the opening reception, we invite gallery patrons to a special presentation at 6pm. Infused with wordplay, found imagery, sound and moving images in multimedia form by Woods, award-winning poet Fred Moten, and Syracuse University Professor and musicologist James Gordon Williams. Titled You are mine. I see now, I’m a have to let you go, this collaboration was generously supported by Syracuse University’s Humanities Center and is part of the 2017-18 Syracuse Symposium: Belonging. Both events are free, open to the public, and offer refreshments.

Urban Video Project (UVP) will feature Suné Woods’ video work, A Feeling Like Chaos, concurrently with When a Heart Scatter, Scatter, Scatter in the Everson’s Robineau Gallery and To Sleep with Terra at Light Work. Woods says that A Feeling Like Chaos “attempts to make sense of a continuum of disaster, toxicity, fear, and a political system that sanctions violence towards its citizens.” This installation will be on view on the Everson Museum’s north facade September 14―23 and October 5―28, 2017, from dusk until 11:00 p.m. Find more information at urbanvideoproject.com.

Los Angeles-based artist Suné Woods creates multi-channel video installations, photographs, sculpture, and collage. Her practice examines absences and vulnerabilities within cultural and social histories. She also uses microcosmal sites such as the family to understand the larger sociological phenomenon, imperialist mechanisms, and formations of knowledge. She is interested in how language is emotively expressed, guarded and translated through the absence and presence of the physical body.

To Sleep With Terra includes photo-collage and works on paper that explore Wood’s ongoing interest in creating her own topographies, gleaned from science, travel, and geographic magazines and books of the past fifty years. The collage work explores the social phenomena that indoctrinate brutality and the ways in which propaganda and exploitation have employed photography.

Woods has said of her artistic journey, “Collage seemed the best way for me to articulate all the complicated sensations that were arising for me while processing these streamed documentations of violence, ecology, and a desire to understand more deeply how seemingly disparate things relate when they are mashed up in a visual conversation.”

Suné Woods has participated in residencies at Headlands Center for the Arts, Vermont Studio Center, The Center for Photography at Woodstock, and Light Work. Woods has received awards from the Visions from the New California Initiative, as well as The John Gutmann Fellowship Award, and The Baum Award for an Emerging American Photographer. She has exhibited her work at the Brooklyn Museum of Art, The Lowe Art Museum, Miami, and The San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery. She received her MFA from California College of the Arts in 2010 and is currently Visiting Faculty at Vermont College of Fine Art.

 

Alumni Yukiyo Kawano Interviewed

A visual artist and a choreographer come together for an Aug. 9 performance work that bears witness to the annihilation of two entire cities and the complex Japanese and American narratives therein.

A scene from a prior performance of "Suspended Moment".

A scene from a prior performance of “Suspended Moment”.

Courtesy of Yukiyo Kawano

Seventy-two years ago, American pilots dropped atomic bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. To this day, historians debate whether, as the U.S. maintained, the bombings were necessary to end World War II in the Pacific Theater, or whether, as some critics hold, they constituted war crimes.

Visual artist Yukiyo Kawano and choreographer Meshi Chavez are the creators of “Suspended Moment,” a multidisciplinary performance work they developed with composer Lisa DeGrace and poet Allison Cobb.

Kawano is from Hiroshima; Chavez grew up in Albuquerque — close enough to the Manhattan Project to have a feel for the American side of this history. They’ve performed this work in places with strong ties to atomic history, like Los Alamos, New Mexico, the Hanford Site, and are now bringing it to Portland for a fifth incarnation.

Chavez’s practice is based in the Japanese performance style butoh. You may have seen it performed by dancers in white makeup, moving with infinitesimal slowness. But Chavez’s style is something more kinetic and stately. In some sequences, he puts himself through organic contortions, twisting and spinning almost out of control. Others are direct references to everyday activities on either side of the Pacific.

Here are some highlights of the conversation.

 

Alumna Yukiyo Kawano | Suspended Moment | Los Alamos Performance

On the anniversary of the world’s first atomic test Suspended Moment, a sculpture installation and Butoh dance and poetry performance by Los Alamos native Allison Cobb, Hiroshima native Yukiyo Kawano, with Butoh choreography/dance by Meshi Chavez, soundscape by Lisa DeGrace, and video projections by Stephen A. Miller, will be performed in Los Alamos, NM.

At the center of the performance is a life-sized sculpture of the bomb dropped on Nagasaki in 1945, created by the artist Yukiyo Kawano. Yuki was born and raised in Hiroshima, a third-generation atomic bomb survivor. She creates her sculptures from WWII-era kimonos that belonged to her grandmother, and sews them together with her hair, melding the DNA of generations of atomic bomb survivors.

co-sponsored by
Los Alamos History Museum, Los Alamos/Japan Project, and Los Alamos County Library System. Funded in part by a grant from the New Mexico Intervention Fund of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Additional Funding: Kawano has received a Career Opportunity Grant award from the Oregon Arts Commission.

The performance takes place from 4-5:30 p.m. at Historic Fuller Lodge, 2132 Central Ave., Los Alamos, NM 87544.

Co-Chair Dont Rhine | Discussed in Savage Minds Article

We’re in Crisis! Time to Slow Down: Discernment in a Trumpian Age

(This occasional post comes from Edgar Rivera Colón, Ph.D. Dr. Rivera Colón is a medical anthropologist and teaches at Columbia University’s Narrative Medicine program. Dr. Rivera Colón is also Assistant Professor of Sociology and Urban Studies at Saint Peter’s University, The Jesuit University of New Jersey. He does spiritual direction with activists as a ministry of the Ecumenical Catholic Church (ECC), an LGBT-affirming faith community, based in Guadalajara, Mexico.)

No hay mal que dure cien años — ni cuerpo que lo resista.” (Popular Puerto Rican saying).

“There is no evil that can last a century — nor bodies equipped to endure it.”

The last weeks have been a marathon (Trumpathon?) of despair, grief, resistance, and mobilization in the wake of Donald Trump’s election victory. I’ve spent part of time having long conversations with younger activists — folks in their 20’s and 30’s — about their feelings of disorientation and anger at what seemed to many to be an impossible electoral outcome. One of most dangerous, hate-spewing, fear-mongering, and vulgar presidential candidates in the US history is about to take over one wing of the state apparatus. Whatever one’s take on the whys and wherefores of the 2016 presidential election results, the negative effect on many bodies, spirits, and minds is palpable and worrying. What to do in such a crisis with so many layers and consequences that could warp even further the American polity for two or three generations hence?

To read full article click here.

Alumni News: Artist Yukiyo Kawano Collaborates with Portland Artists

Yukiyo Kawano graduated from Vermont College of Fine Arts MFA Visual Art low-residency program in August 2012. Recently Kawano and her collaborators, Meshi Chavez and Allison Cobb, discussed their project “A Moment in Time,” with hatchthefuture.org. The performance brings together Kawano’s sculptural objects “Fat Man” and “Little Boy,” replicas of the atomic bombs dropped on her home town of Hiroshima in 1945, Chavez’s Butoh dance practice, and Cobb’s sound poetry. Each of these artists share a geographical link to the age of nuclear bombs and energy (Chavez and Cobb both grew up in New Mexico where nuclear testing occurred), and within this shared legacy, their collaborative practice lays bare a multitude of questions about what it means to live under the invisible threat of nuclear warfare and environmental disaster.

Follow this link to learn more and listen to the interview.

 

 

Winter 2015 Grads

Mimi Solum

Mimi Solum

Sam Erckert

Sam Erckert

Dennis Fougere

Dennis Fougere

David Allio

David Allio

Beth McGee

Beth McGee

Patrick Quinn

Patrick Quinn

Tyler Gill

Tyler Gill

Jeffrey Huston

Jeffrey Huston

LA Watson

LA Watson

Taylor Harlin

Taylor Harlin

Erin Gleason

Erin Gleason

Melora Griffis

Melora Griffis

Joann Argue

Joann Argue

Claire Emery

Claire Emery

Summer 2012 Grads

Alex Ross-Raymond

Alex Ross-Raymond

Yukiyo Kawano

Yukiyo Kawano

Toby Gonzalez

Toby Gonzalez

Wilson Hurst

Wilson Hurst

Terrilynn Quick

Terrilynn Quick

Susan Megur

Susan Megur

Renee Lauzon

Renee Lauzon

Michelle Welzen

Michelle Welzen

Matthew Whitney

Matthew Whitney

Linda King Ferguson

Linda King Ferguson

Josh Worman

Josh Worman

Kathryn Eddy

Kathryn Eddy

Jill Cook

Jill Cook

Jeanette Hart-Mann

Jeanette Hart-Mann

Cindy Pacyk

Cindy Pacyk

Summer 2010 Grads

Cuba Ray

Cuba Ray

Sowsen Mahdi

Sowsen Mahdi

Tereza Swanda

Tereza Swanda

Sarah Gaudette

Sarah Gaudette

Renee Couture

Renee Couture

Roderick Vesper

 

Polly Gailard

Nick Patterson

Maggie McBrien

Maggie McBrien

Kevin Knopp

Lexi Ryckman

Lisa Ulik

David French

David French

Denis Hart

Denis Hart

Emily Lanctot

Emily Lanctot

Frank Page

Kate Renner

Kate Renner

Kathy Couch

Kathy Couch