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Alumni Yukiyo Kawano Interviewed

A visual artist and a choreographer come together for an Aug. 9 performance work that bears witness to the annihilation of two entire cities and the complex Japanese and American narratives therein.

A scene from a prior performance of "Suspended Moment".

A scene from a prior performance of “Suspended Moment”.

Courtesy of Yukiyo Kawano

Seventy-two years ago, American pilots dropped atomic bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. To this day, historians debate whether, as the U.S. maintained, the bombings were necessary to end World War II in the Pacific Theater, or whether, as some critics hold, they constituted war crimes.

Visual artist Yukiyo Kawano and choreographer Meshi Chavez are the creators of “Suspended Moment,” a multidisciplinary performance work they developed with composer Lisa DeGrace and poet Allison Cobb.

Kawano is from Hiroshima; Chavez grew up in Albuquerque — close enough to the Manhattan Project to have a feel for the American side of this history. They’ve performed this work in places with strong ties to atomic history, like Los Alamos, New Mexico, the Hanford Site, and are now bringing it to Portland for a fifth incarnation.

Chavez’s practice is based in the Japanese performance style butoh. You may have seen it performed by dancers in white makeup, moving with infinitesimal slowness. But Chavez’s style is something more kinetic and stately. In some sequences, he puts himself through organic contortions, twisting and spinning almost out of control. Others are direct references to everyday activities on either side of the Pacific.

Here are some highlights of the conversation.

 

Current Student Kate Donnelly @ New City Galerie

New City Galerie in Burlington, VT hosts a group exhibition with current MFA Visual Art student Kate Donnelly through October 24th.

Interpose will feature works by five artists, including Donnelly’s performance art and handmade costumes.

New City Galerie

132 Church Street

Burlington, VT 05401

Visual Art Alumna Nikki Juen Colab Featured in Brooklyn Rail

Article by Kathy Brew

(excerpt)

Art Rising took place at the Trump Tower Public Garden on June 14th, which happens to be Donald Trump’s birthday and Flag Day. It was the latest in a series of actions that have been using this not-so-known public space as a “living lab” to mobilize people around the risks of the Trump presidency—particularly his plan to slash federal funding for the arts.

The event was organized by Take Trump Tower, and curated by Caterina Bartha. As stated in the program notes: “The artists invite you to enjoy the performances and provoke Trump on his birthday inside his home.”

The crowd was mainly a mix of artists and activists, combined with tourists who were coming to the building because it is the home of the POTUS, including some Trump supporters who happened upon the event, along with some Trump Tower security folks hovering on the sidelines, observing with scrutiny (not to mention the presence of police and secret service members as you enter the building).

Things kicked off at noon with Brick x Brick, a group of women dressed in black and white outfits that included text of many of Trump’s misogynist quotes, standing firm as a wall/backdrop for the hour-long event. Lucy Sexton from Dancenoise, who performs as The Factress, was the emcee/host and welcomed Jimmy Van Bramer, the City Council majority leader and chairman of the council’s cultural affairs committee, who spoke of the importance of government funding and saving the NEA. Then the performances began.

To read full article, click here.

Photo by Kathy Brew

Alumna Yukiyo Kawano | Suspended Moment | Los Alamos Performance

On the anniversary of the world’s first atomic test Suspended Moment, a sculpture installation and Butoh dance and poetry performance by Los Alamos native Allison Cobb, Hiroshima native Yukiyo Kawano, with Butoh choreography/dance by Meshi Chavez, soundscape by Lisa DeGrace, and video projections by Stephen A. Miller, will be performed in Los Alamos, NM.

At the center of the performance is a life-sized sculpture of the bomb dropped on Nagasaki in 1945, created by the artist Yukiyo Kawano. Yuki was born and raised in Hiroshima, a third-generation atomic bomb survivor. She creates her sculptures from WWII-era kimonos that belonged to her grandmother, and sews them together with her hair, melding the DNA of generations of atomic bomb survivors.

co-sponsored by
Los Alamos History Museum, Los Alamos/Japan Project, and Los Alamos County Library System. Funded in part by a grant from the New Mexico Intervention Fund of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Additional Funding: Kawano has received a Career Opportunity Grant award from the Oregon Arts Commission.

The performance takes place from 4-5:30 p.m. at Historic Fuller Lodge, 2132 Central Ave., Los Alamos, NM 87544.

Alumna Nikki Juen Protest Performance at Trump Tower | Brick x Brick

Hyperallergic except:

“The performance kicked off not long after noon, when 10 women formed a line and joined hands at the back of a small area that had been designated the stage. They wore jumpsuits printed with black-and-white bricks, on top of which were laid colored panels containing texts such as “Bimbo” and “Grab her by the pussy” — all sexist words and phrases uttered by the US president. The women were part of Brick x Brick, a project begun at the Women’s March to form “human ‘walls’ against misogyny,” and they remained in place under the sweltering sun for the next hour and a half.”

To read full article, click here.

MFA-V Alumna Carissa Burkett Performs @ Disjecta

Liminal’s immersive opera update of Fassbinder’s 1972 black comedy for the stage.

Audiences are invited to wander through a Fassbinder fantasia as Liminal combines performance art, video, and opera into a unique, immersive experience, a hybrid of theatre and gallery installation, of live performance and video.

In this (literally) biting social satire, Phoebe Zeitgeist is an alien agent sent to Earth to investigate human democracy in action. Unfortunately, Phoebe has a problem—she knows our language, but can’t figure out US. Then the vampires show up.

TRIGGER WARNINGS: substance abuse, sexuality, semiotics, societal complacency, firearms, fetishes, structuralism, choking, privileged classes behaving badly, suicide, Hegel.

Purchase tickets here.

Featuring
Carissa Burkett (soprano) as Phoebe Zeitgeist
With Linda Austin, Evan Corcoran, Carla Grant, Wayne Haythorn, Eleanor Johnson, Don Kern, Alex Reagan, Danielle RossTodd Van Voris

Written by Rainer Werner Fassbinder
Translated by Denis Calandra
Direction and Media Design by John Berendzen
Developed by John Berendzen, Evan Corcoran and the ensemble
Original music by John Berendzen and Carissa Burkett
Costume by Faerin Millington and Manot VonRocket
Crew Jared LeeSharon Porter, Nancy Novotny

Featuring Fassbinder zines by Going Place

Disjecta Contemporary Art Center, 8371 N Interstate Ave, Portland, OR 97217

MFA-V Alumna Kathy Couch | Performance|Portrait @ Invisible Dog Art Center

PERFORMANCE| PORTRAIT by A CANARY TORSI – Invisible Dog presents a canary torsi’s new responsive video installation, Performance | Portrait. The work invites each visitor to an encounter with a performer. Grounded in questions of intimacy and connection within the performance experience, four distinguished performers were recorded maintaining their focus on a future audience.

LEAD COLLABORATORS
Yanira Castro (Concept/Choreographer), Kathy Couch (Installation Artist), Stephan Moore (Interaction Designer), Julie Wyman (Filmmaker)

PERFORMER COLLABORATORS
Anna Azrieli, Leslie Cuyjet, Peter Schmitz, David Thomson

This exhibition is part of Intermediaries, a 2016 program co-commissioned and presented by the Invisible Dog and Immediate Medium and funded by the New York State Council on the Arts.

Commissioning support for Performance I Portrait also provided by the Catherine Tell Foundation and Creative Art Council at Brown University, as a part of The Conference for Research on Choreographic Interfaces (CRCI). Performance I Portrait is sponsored, in part, by the Greater New York Arts Development Fund of the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, administered by Brooklyn Arts Council (BAC). It was developed, in part, during a BRIClab Residency at BRIC House in Brooklyn, NY, a residency with producing partner High Concept Labs in Chicago, and with residency support from Gibney Dance Center and ISSUE Project Room in New York and Amherst College in MA. Additional support provided by UC Davis, CA.

Opening Reception: Saturday December 3, from 6 to 10pm
On viewing from Monday to Saturday from 12pm to 7pm, Sunday from 12pm to 5pm

Part of WONDERLAND, annual group exhibition at The Invisible Dog.

Alumni News: Artist Yukiyo Kawano Collaborates with Portland Artists

Yukiyo Kawano graduated from Vermont College of Fine Arts MFA Visual Art low-residency program in August 2012. Recently Kawano and her collaborators, Meshi Chavez and Allison Cobb, discussed their project “A Moment in Time,” with hatchthefuture.org. The performance brings together Kawano’s sculptural objects “Fat Man” and “Little Boy,” replicas of the atomic bombs dropped on her home town of Hiroshima in 1945, Chavez’s Butoh dance practice, and Cobb’s sound poetry. Each of these artists share a geographical link to the age of nuclear bombs and energy (Chavez and Cobb both grew up in New Mexico where nuclear testing occurred), and within this shared legacy, their collaborative practice lays bare a multitude of questions about what it means to live under the invisible threat of nuclear warfare and environmental disaster.

Follow this link to learn more and listen to the interview.

 

 

Performance and Installation 2016